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Full text of "73 Magazine (April 1982)"




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73 Magazine • April, 1982 3 



■i 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

Corrmbutions in the Form of menu- 
Scripts with drawings andiOf photo- 
graphs are welcome and will be con- 
sidered tor possible publication. We 
can assume no reaponsjrjHiiy for loss 
or damage to any material Fleas* 
enclose a stamped, so"-adoressed 
envelope with each submission. Pay- 
ment for the use ot any unsolicited 
malenal will be made upon accep- 
tance- AH contributions should be di- 
rected to the ?3 editorial offices 
"How to Write for 73" guidelines are 
available upon request 

Editorial Offices: 

Pine SI met 

Peterborough NH 03458 

Phona: 603-924*9471 

Advertising Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 

fttorte 603-924-7138 

Circulation Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NH 03453 

Phone; 603-9249471 

Subscription Rates 

In in* United Stales and Possessions 
One Year H2 rssuesj S25 00 
Two Years (24 issues) $m0Q 
Three Years (36 issues) S53.00 

Elsewhere: 

Canada— 127 §7/i year only US 
^urrds Foreign surface matl— $-^ 
yea* only. US lundi Foreign a»r 

m ait — please inquire. 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write to 73 Magazine. Subscription 
Deparlmem. PO Box 931. Farming 
dale NY tl737 For renewal and 
changes of address, include the act 
drees label from your most recent 
Issue of ?3 For gift subscriptions In 
elude your name and address as well 
as those of gift recipients Posrmasr 
Send form #3679 to 73 Magazine. Sub- 
scripllon Sennces PO Bo ^arm 

ingdale, NY tl73? 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Write to 73 Megsztne. Subscription 
Department PO Bom 93 T. Farmmgdale 
NY 11737 Please Include an address 
fabeJ 

T3 Magazine (ISSN 0098-90107 is pub- 
lished monthly by 73, Inc , a subsidiary 
of Wayne Green, Inc. SO Pine Street , 
Peterborough NH 03458. Second class 
postage paid a: Peterborough NH 
03458 and at add>honai mailing offices 
Entire contents copyright 1982 Way 
Green, fne All ng» 3rved. No part 

tJhte publication may be raprmteo 
otherwise reproduced without written 
per 'fom the publisher Micro- 

film Edition — University Microfilm, 
Ann Arbor Ml 4H1Q6. 





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4 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



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68 



76 



94 



102 



Never Say Die- 6, Social Events- 82, Ham Help -8b, 136, 144, 145, 146, Review- 120, DX-123, Fun! -125, 
Reader Service- 130, New Products- 132, tetters- 134, RTTY Loop -137, Contests— 138, Awards- 141, 
Corrections— 145, OSCAR Orbits- 146, Propagation — 177, Dealer Directory — 177 

Cover. This month's cover by Ale* Stevens depicts the astonishing 350-mater {1 1 491 rotating tower ol French amateur Pierre Avrii FtOL Erected during the spring and sum- 
mer ol 1901, tha massive structure tapers from 5.35 metefs(ir2-W) at the base to 1.25 meters (*' M/4"} at In* top. II was designed with the assistance of Swedish engineer 
Vassa Lappet SL t M and Is constructed entirely ol scrap metal salvaged Irom the Saturn V project and Soviet world's fair exhibits. Pierre, who operates mostly CW, is an avid 
county hunter end holds numerous operating awards, He credits his now potent signal to the use of 6cm (2-1/4") nitrogen filled hardline, his trusty TH6DXX, end the selection 
ol a hilltop OTH. This triumph of ihe smeieur spirit is located at Pierre's home in the quiet village ol St. FoudesOndesCourtes, Depl. de 1a Haute Tour, southern France. 
Look lor the construction details on this monster In an upcoming issue of 7"3 



73 Magazine * ApriM982 5 



W2KSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ed/tor/a/ by Wayne Green 




WE'VE BEEN BASHED 

Word has leaked out that Dick 
Bash, the chap who publishes 
the books with the answers for 
the FCC tests, is about to bring 
suit against QST because they 
won't let him advertise his 
books. Well, I don't know what 
their excuse is for that. I suspect 
that they just don't want to help 
sell a book in direct competition 
with their Q&A Manual which 
does about the same thing, only 
not Quite as wa» 

There was a tuss a little while 
back when the FCC was report- 
ed to have lowered the boom on 
Ham Radio magazine, essential- 
ly telling *em that it they con- 
tinued to carry ads for the Bash 
books, the FCC would cut off in- 
formation for their HR Reports 
(now defunct}. The FCC has 
made no bones about being very 
upset over what they see as a 
total defeat of their license 
exams. 

My own view is that Bash's 
books are one of the most 
destructive forces in amateur 
radio. They have removed the 
last vestige of need for a 
newcomer to bother to learn 
even a shred of knowledge 
about the technical end of 



things, opening the gates to 
anyone who can learn the code 
at five words per minute. We've 
seen that kids of four can do 
that, so It certainly is no ac- 
complishment worthy of great 
pride. And so, while on the one 
side I see most hams demand- 
ing that only the code be used to 
keep out the undesirables, on 
the other I hear them bitching 
about the growing mayhem on 
the bands as new turkeys get on 
the air 

The Bash books, as far as I'm 
concerned, are a poison which 
is rapidly sapping the strength 
of what was once a proud hob- 
by, If Carrie Nation were around 
today, she would rip 'em up and 
let the dealers return them to 
Bash for a refund. Alas, most 
hams today can't get their 
wheelchairs into the ham 
stores.*. or maneuver their 
walkers to the book department. 
Only the frustrated CBers are 
making it. 

As far as I know, only CO 
is carrying ads for these in- 
sidious publications. The FCC 
can make rules against them, 
but how can they be enforced? 
So Bash goes on reprinting the 
FCC exams virtually word for 



NEWS FLASH 

On February 17, the Federal Communications Commission 
approved the release of a Notice of Proposed Rule Making 
and Notice of Inquiry that could result in a substantial expan- 
sion of the amateur HF phone subbands. The Commissioners 
propose to expand the present 20-meter allocation by 50 kHz, 
giving General, Advanced, and Extra Class amateurs phone, 
SSTV, and facsimile privileges from 14.150to 14.200 MHz. The 
docket t which is labeled Private Radio Bureau 82-83 t has a 
comment deadline of July 1, with reply comments due August 
2. Along with proposing the 2f>meter expansion, the Commis- 
sioners are seeking comments regarding the expansion of 
other US phone allocations. 73 will bring you the fuii text of 
PRB 82-83 as soon as it Is available. 



word, complete with the an- 
swers. He started out at FCC of* 
fices interviewing people who 
had just been through the exam, 
getting everything they could 
remember and writing it down. 
Today I think he depends on 
cards sent in by people who 
have just taken the exam. Its a 
sure-fire way of totally destroy* 
ing the FCC test. --and the 
fabric of amateur radio, These 
cheat-sheets have been so suc- 
cessful that a large percentage 
of the ham clubs who had been 
giving technical classes to 
prepare people to pass the test 
have given them up. Why spend 
the time and money on classes 
when you can memorize a few 
test answers in a couple of 
hours and f fy through the exam? 

In turn, this has been keeping 
newcomers to amateur radio 
from having to contact the 
clubs,.. and has further 
discouraged club membership, 
So we are seeing many of our 
ham clubs dying. Many are 
becoming geriatric events 
where doddering old-timers 
regale each other with tales of 
long ago triumphs. 

If anyone out there really 
cares about getting amateur 
radio repaired, if anyone would 
like to see us be able to provide 
emergency communications, if 
you'd like to see us start turning 
out some new inventions and 
pioneering new techniques, if 
you are sick of the crap on our 
bands ..then start doing 
something about it. It is up to 
you. Go down to your ham store 
and talk the owner into throwing 
out those Bash books. Tell CO 
what you think of their carrying 
the Bash ads. Let's take some 
steps to make this a technical 
hobby again. Let's see what we 
can do to get hams back into 



building, experimenting, and 
pioneering. 

Let's get our ham contacts 
more interesting by weeding out 
the CBers who never grow up. 
Let's get those technical 
classes in clubs going again. I 
want to be proud to be a 
ham. . .and so do you. 

Carrie Nation. ♦ .where is 
your spirit? 

THE CD DEBACLE 

My editorials on the almost 
non-existent state of Civil 
Defense in the United States 
have apparently fallen upon 
apathetic and uninterested 
eyes. I've had virtually no 
response. Trying to get some life 
Into this desperately needed 
service is like trying to move the 
Queen Mary. 

To go back briefly over the 
situation: As part of the SALT 
agreements our politicians, with 
their usual wisdom and fore- 
sight made a pact with Russia 
setting up the main nuclear 
deterrent as Mutual Assured 
Destruction (MAD). We agreed 
to not protect our cities and peo- 
ple and Russia made the same 
pact. Fine idea. . Jf they blast 
our cities, well blast theirs, and 
no one wins. 

As usual with Russian agree- 
ments, the first step to imple- 
ment it was a massive building 
of nuclear bomb shelters 
throughout Russia. Well, 
they've done well with this. If 
you ever read any news more 
than the ball scores, you know 
that the Russian shelter system 
is an accomplished fact. Per- 
haps it is time to go back and 
change MAD to AAD, American 
Assured Destruction. 

It is unlikely lhat our present 
government is going to do any- 
thing serious to revitalize Civil 

Defense, They're fighting to cut 
expenses, not generate 
them, ., fighting against the 
massive social reform ex- 
penses. A recent study of 
Sweden on PBS showed the 
result of socialism carried to the 
extreme. Depressing. 

Amateur radio has never de- 
pended on the government for 
support. The fact is that in Just 
about every case you can men- 
tion, the government has hurt 
amateur radio when it has med- 
dled with It* Left to our own 
resources, we would have a 
much larger amateur radio ser- 
vice, would be years ahead in 
technology, and our country 
would not have been passed by 



6 73 Magazine • April, 1962 







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MidCom Electronics 
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OREGON 

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of Nashville 
Madison. TN 37115 
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Electronics Center 
Daiias,TX 75201 
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Hardin Electronics 

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Madison Electronics 
Houston, TX 77010 
(713) 658-026B 
Kennedy Associates 
San Antonio. TX 78222 
(512) 333-6110 

WASHINGTON 

A-B-C Communications 

Seattle, WA 98155 
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Amateur Radio 
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Seait e rVA 98108 
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TS-130SE. or TS-530S amati sqUo product The purchase must be made during (he 
period March t. through June 15, 1962 The customer must present a separate coupon 
(one only) for each of the listed models being purchased. Additional coupons are available 
from our auihorlzed dealers. TRIO-KENWOOD assumes no responsibility for the inability 
of any of its dealers or of itself lo deliver any specific product within the period specified 
in the foregoing Offer valid only in the USA void where taxed or prohibited by law 
Re idlers are not eligible to participate in this program. This coupon is a part of TRIO- 
KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 'BONUS BUCKS" sales program. It has no value unless 

omitted in compliance with the rules of that program prior to June 15. 1982. 

® KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 





/ /1982 



Model Purchased 



Date Purchased 



Dealer Name: 

Customer 
Name. 



Calf Sign. 




Address: 



City. __ 



State/ Zip: 



Customer Signature: 



73-BB/62 



1 1 West Walnut, Compton. California 90220 



Good Mar. 1 through Jutx 15, 1982 



■■ 



STAFF 



PUBLISHERJEDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NSDM 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 
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Com ei' a Tav>(F 



Japan and possibly Russia in 
technology. 

With amateur radio the only 
practical system for emergency 
communications, one might 
think that the government would 
be interested and perhaps even 
cooperative. But no, CO is a 
disaster in most areas of the 
country. Few CD officials have 
wanted to cooperate with am- 
ateurs, so there isn't much do- 
ing as far as organized CD com- 
munications is concerned* This 
has not stopped the CD officials 
from spending all of the money 
allocated to their areas, even 
though most, if not all, of the 
money is wasted. 

We can bring some light Into 
this dark area if readers with 
personal knowledge of what is 
happening in their communities 
will write and let me know. Let's 
bring this out into the open and 



see if we can't get some offi- 
cial pressure to improve the 
situation. 

With or without CD coopera- 
tion, I'd like to see amateurs set 
up a national emergency com- 
munications system. . .one 
which would provide the com* 
munications which will be need- 
ed in case of the worst. Re- 
member, if we don't have such a 
system set up and working on a 
daily basis when there is no 
emergency, it is not likely to be 
of much value when things are 
in an uproar 

With some guidance and 
leadership, we might be able to 
get many ham clubs to establish 
special emergency teams. Well 
be wanting to provide com- 
munications not only between 
hams, but also have a system of 
communicating with most of the 
other civilian and governmental 



radio services. This will mean 
the establishing of emergency 
communications centers with 
their own power and equipment 
capable of operating on a wide 
range of frequencies. 

If any clubs are doing this, 
we'd like to have some pictures 
and an article. This might en- 
courage other groups to work 
along similar lines. 

Or would you rather just rag- 
chew and wait, hoping that the 
Russians will feel sorry for our 
unprotected cities and be nice 
enough not to take advantage? 

KILLING THE WOODPECKER 

Yes, the damned thing is a 
pain. And it isn't going to go away 
unless you do something about 
it. We already know what it is. 
We know where it is. We know 

Continued on page 4 4 



Well ... I Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 



A NI> Etv" 5 ni, 





"It's the greatest thing to come along in engineering! Here— for two 
dollars— is a 160-meter antenna. . .six inches long!" 



B 73 Magazine • April, 1982 





far above average ! 



With the new TR5 



COMING SOON: 

RV75 Synthesized VFO 

featuring the Drake "VRTO" 

Frequency Synthesized for crystal -control led 
stability ■ VRTO (Variable Bate Tuning Oscillator*) 
adjusts tuning rate as function of tuning speed. 

Resolution to 10 Hz * Three programmable fixed 
frequencies for MARS. etc. Split or Transceive 
operation with main transceiver PTO or RV7S 

* Patent pending 



versatility and value are spelled D-R-A-K-E . . 



Dynamic 

"^ RANGE 




ELIABLE 

SERVICE 



The dynamic range of the TR5 is unexcelled by any transceiver in its class. The TRS's 
greater than dBm third order intercept point (8S dB two-tone dynamic range) at 20 
kHz spacing can be achieved only by the use of a passive diode-ring double balanced 
mixer Drake was the first to bring this technology to the Amateur market with a 
high-level mixer In the TR7. 

When you purchase a TR5* or any Drake product, you acquire a product of the latest 
production techniques, which provide reliable performance. 

Yet with a product as sophisticated as one of today's transceivers, after-sales 
service is a must, Ask any Drake owner. Our Customer Service Department has a 
reputation second to none. 



Accessories 



K 



ILOWATT 
AMPLIFIER 



Drake is the only Amateur Radio manufacturer who offers a full complement of 

accessories to satisfy almost every desire the HF Amateur may have. This wide 
selection allows any operator to assemble a station which meets his needs, and 
assures compatible interfacing and styling instead of a desk full of equipment with 
a variety of styling and poor operation as a system. 

Everyone wants to be heard! The accessory L75 and its 3-500Z (1200 watts PEP 
input) and a decent antenna will do the trick. This rugged self-contained amplifier/ 
power supply will put the TR5 on an even footing with the best of them. 



The TR5 and all Drake Transceivers, are backed by the best in engineering. The TR5 
is the result of an extensive engineering effort, combining proven past techniques 
and ideas with new state of the art concepts. 

As a result, the TR5 wit! not be superceded by a new model every six months. It 
represents a true radio communications value that will provide many years of 
operating enjoyment. 




NGINEERING 



See your Drake dealer 

or write for 

additional information. 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 



Features* availability and prices subject -inge without notice or obligation 

540 Richard St . Msamisburg. Ohio 45342. USA 
Phone: (51 31 866-2431 • Tele* 28B-01 7 




Al Ctkas KA9CDL 
2172 Stonehenge 
Springfield It 62702 



Watching the Weathe 

a cheap and easy conversion 



r 




The converted fax unit The a utotrans former is to the left of the desk fax. The motor capaci- 
tors are shown between the drum and the power transformer occupying the area formerly 
used for the exciter tamp. 

10 73Magazine * April, 1982 



The Western Union desk- 
fax offers an inexpen- 
sive approach to the recep- 
tion of satellite cloud-cover 
pictures. This article de- 
scribes a complete satellite 
receive system using the 
deskfax recorder. Little ac- 
tual construction is nec- 
essary and the results can 
be equal to those of more 
complicated systems. The 
receive system and the fax 
display unit are separate 
elements and are discussed 
individually. 

Receiver Conversion 

The receiver needed here 
should be capable of FM 
reception somewhere be- 
tween 20 and 50 MHz and 
should be tunable in order 
to compensate for Doppler 
shift. A receiving converter 
is used to bring the satellite 
frequencies within range of 
the FM receiver. Several 
radio sets which qualify are 
listed in Table 1. 



All of the receivers men 
tioned in Table 1 sell for 
less than $35 and one of 
these or a similar receiver 
should be obtained first. 
Then it is a matter of select- 
ing a converter with an out- 
put which falls within the 
tuning range of the receiv- 
er. The converter crystal 
determines this output fre- 
quency. 

One attractive prospect 
is the use of a converter 
which reduces the incom- 
ing signal by exactly 100 
MHz, A satellite signal 
transmitted at 137.45 MHz 
is thus converted to 37,45 
MHz and the digit one is 
mentally added to the front 
of the receiver dial How- 
ever, it should be noted that 
receivers which cover 28-39 
MHz usually sell for about 
ten dollars more than those 
which tune 20-28 MHz. In 
this case, the frequency 
conversion should be in- 
creased to 115 MHz for an 
output of 22 MHz The con- 
verter should not change 
the satellite signals in such 
a manner that would permit 
interference from Citizens 
Band transmitters. That is, a 
frequency difference of 110 
MHz should be avoided, 

I use an R-108 military 
surplus receiver and a con- 
verter purchased from 
Hamtronics Co. The re- 
ceiver is more sensitive 
than its BC-603 counterpart. 
but it requires a filament 
supply of 6 V dc at 6 Am- 
peres as well as a 135-V dc 
B-plus supply. The R-108 
does have some nice fea- 
tures to make it a worth- 
while purchase, One is a 
fixed level of audio output 
that is independent of the 
speaker volume control. 
The fixed output can be fed 
directly to the deskfax re- 
corder, A tuning aid in the 
form of an oscillator is also 
included. 

A simple turnstile anten- 
na, consisting of two 
crossed dipoles with reflec- 
tors, was made from a 
wooden mast and some 





The Deskfax conversion system described in the text is pictured here. Although the deskfax 
is shown with the top cover in place, it is better to have the cover removed for actual use. 
The picture also shows the FM receiver and the converter, preamp t and power supply for 
the solid-state circuits, 



V4-inch aluminum tubing. 
RC-59 was used as 
feedline. This antenna pro- 
vides excellent signals and 
good pictures can be ob- 
tained on overhead passes. 
Once the satellites have 
been heard, the orbit calcu- 
lations are quite simple. 

Some simple DXing and 
notetaking will reveal 
enough information for 
short-term predictions of 
the next satellite pass. 
Commercially-available 
satellite-tracking kits such 
as the one the ARRL pro- 
vides for the OSCAR sat- 
ellites are helpful in the 



initial efforts to understand 
orbital mechanics and the 
unusual behavior it imparts 
to satellite paths. 

Picture Display 

The deskfax conversion 
is almost as simple as the 
receiving system. The desk- 
fax unit is used essentially 
as is, with only minor mod- 
ifications made for con- 
venience Since no type of 
transmission is desired in 
this unit some of the trans- 
mit circuitry is disabled or 
removed. 

Once the deskfax unit is 
obtained, a few operational 



checks should be made. 
The first check is to see that 
the unit functions when the 
incoming and outgoing but- 
tons are pressed. It should 
be noted which of the re- 
lays operate in each mode, 
paying attention to the in- 
coming function. 

A relay marked LR P lo- 
cated near the back of the 
unit, must be operated 
manually as the incoming 
switch is pressed. A rubber 
band stretched around the 
LR contact wafer and at- 
tached to the 6AU6 tube, 
located between relays TR 
and ACK, provides a conve- 



Radio 


Set 


Type 


Frequency Coverage 


Notes 


BC-603 




military surplus 


20-28 MHz 


sold w/o power 
supply 


FM06 




military surplus 


20-28 MHz 


sold w/o power 
supply 


BC-683 




military surplus 


28-39 MHz 


sold w/o power 
supply 


R-109 




military surplus 


28-39 MHz 


sold w/o power 
supply 


Radio Shack 


police band 


30-50 MHz 


solid state, power 


VHP Pro 






supply included 



Table 1. Possible radios for receiver conversion. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 



11 







»h 



*LlG*ME*T 

OSCILLATOR 



R&?9U 



P-9 
PRE AI#P 



ijfHni 



C*->4* 

converter 

HAMTROMCS 



ZtMHt 



ft- 10* 

FM 
RCVtt 



WJQtC TO 3*^4* E° 



4 



FtiEB LEVEL 
AUDIO TO 



CESKTAK 



AUTO TRANSFORMER 



MEW 

CAPACITOR 



BOKHf 

- 4 

osc 



JfrAHj 



DIVIDER 
CHAIN 



*qn* 



40 WATT 

AUDIO 

AMPLIFIER 



OUTPUT 



HOT 




SROUBO JCOHHOH 



Fig. 1. Block diagram of the complete fax system. 



LEAVE 2 GRA* WIRES 

TO LAMP 



TOGGLE 
SWITCH 



LAMP 



POWER CORD 




meowing (J== 



SHE Efl WIRE I CONNECT 
TQ MR RELAY T0 OWE LUG 




PHQWE JACK 

AUDIO INPUT 

FRQV 
RECEIVER 



FRONT 



DESKFAX BOTTOM VIEW 



BE A ft 



Fig. 2. A few simple wiring changes are needed to modify a deskfax unit 



nient way to anchor this 
relay into operation. Now 
relay PWR should close, 
and the 6V6 tube will start 
to glow As the 6V6 tube 
warms up, a number 47 
lamp in the B-plus power 
supply will also start to 
glow, dimly. The relay 
marked HR will close and 
the rotating drum will start 
to advance toward the op- 
posite end of the fax ma- 
chine At the end of the 
drum's travel, a screw lo- 
cated on the forward end of 
the drum touches a post 
which shuts off the incom- 
ing switch deck, resets the 
relays, and allows the drum 

12 73Magazme • April, 1982 



spring to return the drum to 
its original position. 

If all this occurs, the unit 
is probably OK If the 6V6 
or HR relay fail to operate. 
check the cathode and 
plate voltages on the 6V6, 
The cathode should have 
16-20 V dc and the plate 
should have 280-300 V dc. 
Failure to read these 
voltages indicates that one 
of the larger resistors in the 
deskfax is opened, The grid 
voltage on this tube is prac- 
tically nil. 

To the rear of the drum is 
the stylus arm. A small 
aluminum clip containing a 
steel wire stylus fastens to 



this arm. The incoming 
check should be repeated 

again, this time to verify 
operation of the stylus. 
With a piece of fax paper 
on the drum, begin the 
testing procedure again. At 
the rear of the deskfax, be- 
tween relays LR and ACK, 
there is a pot listed as PI. 
After the drum starts mov- 
ing, PI should be advanced 
until the stylus begins to 
burn the fax paper. If the 
fax paper does not burn, try 
placing an audio signal 
across the end taps of the 
transformer located near 
the incoming switch deck. 
The fax paper will burn ac- 



cording to the intensity of 
the audio signal. 

A new stylus, if needed, 
can be made from a steel 
wire cut from a wire brush 
or a wire wheel. It is not 
necessary to solder the new 
wire to the old stylus clip; 
merely route the new wire 
though the holes that are in 
the clip, then install it in the 
holder, Using this method, 
it is possible to attach a 
2-inch-long wire and extract 
it toward the drum as it 
burns down. In this way, the 
stylus need not be changed 
so often 

Now the deskfax is ready 
for conversion. First, re- 
move the wires that are 
connected to the coil of LR 
Remove the buzzer and the 
ACK push-button switch. 
The orange wire which fol- 
lows the switch deck har- 
ness should be attached to 
the ACK lamp and the 
jumper from the push-but- 
ton to the lamp should be 
deleted. The short gray wire 
should also be removed. 
The ACK lamp will now 
have one side connected to 
3 blue wires and the other 
side will have 2 gray wires 
and 1 orange wire. The ACK 
tamp will not light. A toggle 
switch should be attached 
where the push-button was 
mounted. Unsolder the 
power cord and move it far- 
ther into the chassis until 
one wire will reach the new 
toggle switch. Then solder 
that wire to one side of the 
switch. Trace the remaining 
wire back to the rear power 
fuse. Cut the wire there and 
solder it to the empty termi- 
nal on the rear fuseholder. 
Using the piece of power 
cord that was just cut off, 
connect the empty terminal 
of the front fuseholder to 
the remaining terminal of 
the toggle switch. This will 
complete the wiring of the 
main power switch. 

Remove the exciter lamp 
assembly and its trans- 
former If you do not desire 
to manually operate relay 
LR, it may be left on per- 
manently by soldering the 
contacts together or jump- 

Reader Service for teeing page **3Q3-* 



HEATH 
AND HAMS 




Who builds the best Amateur Radio gear 
around? You do I Thousands of Hams attest to 
the reliable performance, specifications and long- 
term dependability of Heathkit Amateur equip- 
ment. Mot to mention the thrill of airing a rig that 
you've built with your own hands. The more than 
200 Hams at Heath invite you to join the fun. 

For over three decades, our unique We won't 
let you fair philosophy has created a strong part- 
nership between Hams and Heath, the world's 
loading electronic kit manufacturer- Heath is com- 
mitted to designing equipment and accessories 
of the highest quality that will withstand the test 
Of performance QSO after QSO. 

Amateur Radio is an exciting, worthwhile hobby 
Starting and pursuing it with Heathkit equipment 
is the best way to go. Our complete line can pro- 
vide everything you need, from a base Code 
Practice Oscillator and self-study License Courses 
alt the way to a sophisticated station of operation 
with remote capability. Pacesetter Amateur Radio 
enthusiasts are even using Heath/Zenith com- 
puters to des*gn antennas, plot beam headings, 
track OSCAR and transmit RTTY Heath and 
Hams, once again, are perfect partners m in a 
new adventure. 

See the complete Amateur Radio line in 
our latest catalog or visit your nearby 
Heathkit Electronic Center 

Where Heathkit products are displayed, sold and 
serviced. See your telephone directory white pages 
for the store near you. 

"Heath Company and Ver (technology Electronics Corporation 

are wholly -owned subsidiaries of Zenilh Radio Corporation 
The Heathkit Electronic Centers are operated by Veniecbnology 
Elecironics Corporation 



%MM£,/^t£e Mutt a£$ea£& 




A HEATHKIT TOP- OF -THE- LIME 1 STATION: 1, S5-644A Remote WO 2. SB 104A HF Trans* 
ceivet 3- SB- 604 PS-H44 SS8 Speaker and Power Suppiy 4. HDP- 242 VOXPTT CardtOid 
Desk Mike 5. SB-634 Five- Function Station Console 6. SBH14 CRT Station Monitor 7. 
HM 2t 40 DuaJ HF Wattmeter 8. SB-221 2kW Linear Amplifier 9. Guaranteed Self- study Courses 
for Novice. General and Advanced Class Licensing 10. SA- 5010 ji Mai ic Memory Keyer 11. H-fl9 
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^A' B A I f\f ii Sand tor your tree copy of the latest, colorful 104-page Heathkit Catalog toy writing: Heath Company, Oepi 011 6&4 
% fc\/\ile Benton Harbor. Ml 49022. In Canada conteel Haelh Co.. 14o0 Dundai Street E-, Miettssauge> ONT L4X 2R7. 



M 



-5VDC 




Fig. 3, This 40-Hertz signal source drives an audio amplifier which powers the deskfax drum 
motor. 

3»F APPftOaJUATClY 

30OV 

WOU- ELECTROLYTIC 



DRUM l*QTOH 



apfl 



in 



CONNECT HOT LEAD TO 
APPROPRIATE TAP ON 

TRANSFORMER 



1 



: 



'!■! 



Mfll 

LEAD 



sn 



40 < 



40Hi SIGNAL 
ffiOM AMPLJf tER 
OUTPUT 



T 



-» 



/ 



PRIMARY 
WINDING 
NOT USEO 




I tO VAC 
MEASURED 
AETWEEN 
THESC TWO 
POINTS 



LIAS 



RE TURN LEAD 



*£Z wi*E 



/ 



GflEtN WIRE 



f jg. 4. The 40-Hertz signal from the amplifier is stepped up to run the motor, A dc voltmeter 
placed at the output of the amplifier will read approximately 12 volts going into the 
autotransformer. A lower voltage indicates the amplifier does not have sufficient output 
power to drive the motor 



ering them. The unshielded 
leads of the input line 
leading to the input trans- 
former should be replaced 
with shielded audio wire. 
The original wire exited 
through a hole in the rear of 
the chassis. This hole will 
accommodate a phone jack 
very nicely. 

Up to now the conver- 
sion steps described have 
been for the sake of con- 
venience and could be by- 
passed if desired. But the 

14 73 Magazine ■ Apnl,1982 



final step is a must. There 
are four wires that lead 
from the gray drum motor 
located at the top of the fax 
machine. Trace these wires 
as far back from the motor 
as possible, then clip them 
loose. This should only be 
done after the fax machine 
checks out completely. The 
white wire will attach to a 
2.5-^F capacitor located be- 
low the exciter lamp trans- 
former and this capacitor 
should also be removed. 



Originally the drum mo- 
tor turned the drum at 180 
rpm; this will not synchro- 
nize with any 120-rpm fax 
signals presently used on 
the satellite bands. In order 
to minimize the cost and 
complexity of fax systems, 
a plan was long ago devised 
which makes use of the ex- 
isting motor by altering the 
frequency at which the 
motor operates. This is ac- 
complished by replacing 
the 60-Hertz line voltage 



with one operating at 40 
Hertz, This system is by no 
means new, but few details 
have ever been published 
on how to go about it. This 
approach becomes more 
desirable when fax units 
which operate at 120 rpm 
are priced 

My circuit consists of an 
oscillator and a divider 
chain which together pro- 
duce a 40-Hertz square- 
wave output which is fed to 
an audio amplifier, where 
the signal is coupled to the 
drum motor through an au- 
totransformer. A square 
wave is necessary for the 
divider chain to function 

properly. 

The oscillator circuit was 
originally designed by Ken 
Cornell as part of a trans- 
mitter for the license-free 
1750-meter band and was 
first published in the 
newsletter of the Longwave 
Club of America. It is with 
Ken's kind permission that 
the modified circuit is in* 
eluded here, The circuit 
was selected for its stable 
square-wave output. The 
oscillator and the divider 
chain both operate from a 
five-volt power supply. The 
Cornell circuit makes use of 
a crystal operating at 80 
kHz and divides the signal 
down to the 20 kHz the di- 
vider chain requires. Since 
the oscillator circuit was 
designed for a much higher 
crystal frequency, it may 
take a few seconds warmup 
time to get the oscillator 
perking. A suitable substi- 
tute for Ken's design would 
be an oscillator operating 
at 100 kHz f divided by 5. 
Only the 80-kHz crystal and 
7473 IC chip need to be 
changed. This should be 
considered if a 100-kHz 
crystal is more readily 
available. 

The divider chain con- 
sists of a few components 
and a handful of ICs. The 
frequency divisions may be 
verified by monitoring the 
outputs of each IC The 
40-Hertz output is then fed 
to an audio amplifier I 
used a tape recorder am- 



HAL Puts MORE Behind The Buttons 



45-1200 Baud RTTY 
1-100 WPM Morse 



Code 



Black „ ,. 

_, Half 

72 or 36 White ** 

Character characters J u \ l 

Unes I Unshift °f iw ' 

2 Page Status I on I Synchronous 

Display Indicator | Space I Idle 

I on Screen/ (For Baudot) f 'Diddle") 



Auto 

TX/RX 

Control 



un 



oris Te 



CT2100 



DATA 



ML KHC 



AIl.I k^'jL^vh "*Q«| 



WtAT 
iTj,rut 



ClXW 



vlJjii) 



TUNING IND4CATCMK 



bPACl ' ■ 



ntjil CONTVOi 



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MONItOt 

Auvtf 



■ 1 

1 


■1 v 1 


I 




our*v> 



Auto All 3 RTTY 

Four internal M»r*-Hold Shifts 

RTTY Demodulators ^'9" or Low Tones) 

I £ SSS S3 £ On.Sc T| Tu„,„ fl B., 

Ext. Scope Connections 



Audio or 

RS232 

Data 



Transmit ' 

and Receive 
With RTTY Loop Devices 

Audio Monitor 
iff Audio For Either 

F rom input or Output 

ver or Tape Signals 

Internal Speaker 
Plus External Output 



Input Audio 

From 

Receiver or Tape 



JT2100 System: 

• CT2100 Communications Terminal 

• KB2100 Keyboard 

• Video Monitor 

• Printer (300Bd Serial ASCII-MPI-B8G) 



RM2100 Rack Adapter 
MSG2100 2000 Character 
"Brag Tape" ROM 



• 24 Line Display 

• 2 Pages of 72 
Character Lines 

•or 
4 Pages of 36 
Character Lines 

• Split Screen 
(with KB2100) 



Cottwm*W cation* Tvmvnol 



CT210 



Ml 



f. 



ft 



CT71O0 



1 MBk 



9" TV Monitor 



B2100 





■ 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 
Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 
21 7367-7373 



Dennis W. Phillips KA4RUL 
tWI ibis Drive 
Orlando Fi 328Q3 



The Sinkhole That Ate 

Winter Park 

hams vs. hole 



When I locked the door 
to my business on 
the afternoon of Friday 
May 8, 1981, looking for- 
ward to a weekend of relax- 
ation, I did not know that 
within 48 hours my faith in 
terra f irma would be shaken 
forever and that my faith in 
the value of amateur radio 

would be renewed, 

Winter Park is just across 
the city line from Orlando 
and right in the center of 
the state of Florida. The 
area is noted for the many 
lakes which dot the land- 



scape, These lakes are fed 
from the massive Florida 
aquifer, a spongy, water- 
soaked limestone bed that 
lies under the whole central 
area of Florida, During 
times of drought, the water 
level falls and the porous 
rock can collapse. When 
this happens on a large 
scale, the resultant depres- 
sion is called a sinkhole, It 
appears to be a monstrous 
crater to the center of the 
Earth which is devouring its 
surroundings, It is both 
frightening and, when oc- 



curring in an urban area, 
dangerous and disastrous, 

Early Saturday morning, I 
was behind my lawnmower 
enjoying the Fruits of Sub- 
urban Living, the Right to 
Life, Liberty, and the Pur- 
suit of Crabgrass, when the 
ringing telephone offered a 
respite from the sun. It was 
an employee of mine, call- 
ing to find out it I knew any- 
thing about my shop's con- 
dition. She had heard that 
the area was sinking. 

I called the police imme- 
diately, but they had no in- 







18 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



formation to give me other 
than the fact that there was 
a sinkhole; they advised me 
to stay away, That same in- 
formation was confirmed 
by a call to the Fire Depart- 
ment I frantically called 
City Hall — no answer, Then 
a thought flashed in my 
mind and I raced to the 
shack, flipped on the 
2-meter rig, and dialed up 
the local repeater. I called 
for a break, and there on 
frequency and at the sink 
hole was a ham friend, Ed 
Cox WQRAO/4. He had just 
happened to be passing, 
noticed the emergency 
vehicles, and stopped for a 
look! Ed described the ac 
tivities and area of involve- 
ment and then advised me 
on the best way to get into 
the area 

Armed with this informa- 
tion, I raced over from my 
home for an inspection. The 
area looked like a scene 
from a B horror movie- Fair- 
banks Avenue, normally the 
main east-west road 
through the town, had a six- 
block section barricaded. 
Many emergency vehicles 
skirted the perimeter. 
Police had established a 
crowd-control line And 
there in front of the wid- 
ened eyes of hundreds of 
spectators was a gaping Cra- 
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ter One almost expected 
some primordial beast to 
rear its head from the 
depths. The pit was 400 feet 
across, over 150 feet deep, 
and contained a dry clean- 
ing plant, a TV store, a print 
shop, six Porsches, and the 
back end of an auto repair 
shop. For dessert, it had 
eaten a three-bedroom 
house, parts of two streets, 

and an Olvmpic-size city 
swimming pool. 

I stood in the front door 
of my shop — just 125 feet 
from the rim — in total dis- 
belief, I had been a resident 
of central Florida for awhile 
and knew that although 
sinkholes were not too un- 
common, this gigantic one 
was very unusual. A passing 
police officer said that 
three other smaller sink- 
holes had opened up else- 
where in the county. 

As the crater began to as- 
sume a round rim, however, 
I felt that perhaps my prop- 
erty would be saved. And 
when a telephone utility 
worker came by and mut- 
tered that if a nearby main 
trunk line went, south 
Florida would be sending 
letters for a while, I got an 
idea 

Here was the prospect of 
a communication emer- 
gency and mounting na- 
tional and international in- 
terest. I should set up a por- 
table amateur station on 
my property near the hole! I 
also had easy access to the 
local geologist's temporary 
field headquarters, where 

20 73 Magazine • AprilJ9a2 



complete factual informa- 
tion would be available on 
this and other sinkholes. 

I made the ten-minute 
trip home and rushed into 
the shack. I wondered — 
what kind of antenna? 
What rig? What about pow- 
er? I would have to home- 
brew an antenna 1 grabbed 
some RC-58/U from a pile 
of Hamfest Fallout. I also 
found some 450-Ohm lad- 
der line. In the utility room, 
I had a coil of Romex house 
wiring, scraps of stranded 
copper wire, and an old ex- 
tension cord I borrowed a 
marine battery from a 
neighbor. I was certain that 
I could do something with 
all this wire, but to be sure, I 
took the matchbox tuner I 
also chose my tube-type rig 
(Drake R4B and T4XB) rath- 
er than my new solid-state 
rig because of the reputa- 
tion of tubes in the finals 
during high swr conditions. 

Finally, I took along my 
dummy load, a ham's most 
important device, I knew I 
could tune the rig with the 
known 50Ohm value of the 
dummy load. 

My station wagon looked 
as though I had just come 
from a binge at a hamfest. 
My XYL came running down 
the driveway with a D-104 
mike and a CW key. She ad- 
vised, "Be careful. Honey, 
and you need these, don't 
you ? I could see bits of 
tears in her eyes, and, had I 
waited, I think she would 
have renewed her pledge to 
get her ham ticket. 



As f drove back to the 
shop, I heard national net- 
work news on a local sta- 
tion exclaim, "And in Win- 
ter Park, Florida, a mas- 
sive sinkhole continues to 
swallow the business 
district " 

I screeched to a halt in 
my parking lot and assem- 
bled the gear in the front 
room of the shop. In the of- 
fice, I had a fresh copy of 
the May issue of 73 , and 
there in the pages was an ar- 
ticle on coaxial dipoles! I 
fished out the RC-58/U and 
home-brewed a 20-meter 
coax antenna My emergen- 
cy mast was a piece of 1 x 
2 wood stuck down in the 
toilet vent pipe on the roof 
I taped the center of the 
dipole to the mast using 
duct tape and used twine to 
support the ends, one 
strung from a tree limb and 
the other from my business 
sign. The feedline came in 
through a window, 

A quick hookup to the 
power supply, and the 
tubes began to glow. The 
antenna worked! I heard 
the reassuring crackle of 
CW, then a fast load-up, 
and I was on the air. The 
band was down at the time, 
but I was reaching New 
York and the midwest with 
599 signals. My Advanced 
class ticket was barely a 
month old, so I went up to 
the phone bands. 

During the next several 
hours, the amateurs I con- 
tacted by CW and phone 
were very interested in the 



facts about the sinkhole 
and surprised that there 
was an amateur station so 
close to the event. They 
asked about relatives in the 
central Florida area, and we 
would tell them what we 
knew about the other sink- 
holes as well as ours. Sever- 
al amateurs were con- 
cerned about their proper- 
ties in Florida, and we pro- 
vided information regarding 
water rationing in southern 
Florida as well as on 
sinkhole damages in the 
central areas. 

Two days later, the geol- 
ogists and city officials felt 
that the massive hole was 
stabilized and only minor 
expansion would continue 
They decided to open Fair- 
banks Avenue, but for pe- 
destrian traffic only. The 
crowds were huge. The 
Great Winter Park Sinkhole 
became the number one at- 
traction in central Florida, 
We estimated that over 
35,000 people flocked to 
the area to see the awe- 
some sight, I made some 
quick arrangements with a 
T-shirt firm and reopened 
my business to cater to the 
crowds, On the front coun- 
ter remained my portable 
rig, and we continued to 
operate, to the delight of 
the crowds. 

I was forced to remain in 
my building for long hours 
during the initial collapse 
phase so that I could re- 
spond to the city engineers 
and be informed of the sta- 
tus of my property. After 

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the worst was over p 1 decid- 
ed to experiment with the 

variety of materials I had 
and see just exactly what I 
could accomplish in anten- 
na design with the barest of 
essentials. 

1 was pleasantly sur- 
prised to find that almost 
anything can be made to 
radiate The antenna tuner 
was worth its weight in 
gold. Using coax teedline 
and standard dipole 
lengths, I constructed ra- 
diators from stripped 
Romex house wiring, lamp 
cord, and even a piece 
of transformer winding 
The most novel was a 
length of kite-string doused 
with salty water! We assem- 
bled it on the roof and 
sponged on the brine It 
loaded up fine, but then 
the swr meter went crazy. 
The observer on the roof 
yelled down, "Hey, the wa- 
ter is drying up!" Either 
the hot sun or the rf was 
evaporating the salty solu- 
tion. We tried loading the 
string again at night but 
evaporation was still rap* 
id, so we never did con- 
clude what the real culprit 
was. Perhaps it was a 
combination. 

One fascinating observa- 
tion was made with an end- 
fed zepp. The capacitance 
of ihe antenna and tuning 
values seemed to follow a 
slow shift white operating 
during the day and evening. 
I was baffled The 40-meter 
antenna hadn't moved, we 
hadn't readjusted the rig, 
and nothing seemed to 
have changed. Late in the 
evening, however, a geolo- 
gist was updating me on the 
hole and mentioned that 
the water was slowly rising 
in the bottom of the sink- 
hole. Could it be that the 
capacitance to ground had 
been changing and it was 
detected by the tuning 
values of the antenna? 
Since the level of water in 
the hole was the basic level 
under the building and an- 
tenna also, perhaps we had 
discovered a way of mea- 

22 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



suring the water table using 
antenna values! 

There did seem to be a 
correlation, and the head 
geologist was excited about 
the prospects. This was real 
ham radio— experimenting. 
learning, and discovering! 

On the operational side, I 
learned a lot of things since 
most of the time I was in the 
middle of a pileup. I found 
it difficult to write down the 
calls and reports and work 
the PTT button or the key, I 
soon developed the skill of 
writing with the right hand 
and working the PTT with 
the left A footsw itch would 
have been nice! 

I gave up on VOX action 
due to the local noise level. 
On phone, rather than 
working one station at a 
time and then calling QRZ, 
I copied down all the calls 
I could hear within about 
10 seconds and, as the ac- 
tion died down, repeated 
their calls. As soon as I 
had a list of a dozen or so, 
I worked each of the calls 
on the list, I found this sys- 
tem to be much more effi- 
cient than creating a 
shouting match after each 
call, On CW, I found the 
operators to be a little 
easier to work. I also dis- 
covered that the pileups 
occurred on CW down 
around 14.025 to 14.030, 
the secret hideout of the 
fluent CW ham. 

To encourage participa- 
tion with us, we developed 
a certificate, the W.A.S., or 
"Worked All Sinkholes." 
This bit of wallpaper served 
as a QSL and as an item to 
create interest. 

Armed with a hemi- 
sphere map. I began to plot 
areas where our signal was 
reaching at various times of 
the operation. Sure enough, 
you could see the zones as 
the reports came back to 
us. I reconfirmed that by 
raising the antenna one 
lowers the angle of the radi- 
ation and thereby changes 
the area of coverage. 

I continued to learn 
things back in the shack. I 



began to make lists of the 
things to remember during 
portable operation: Re- 
member a box of spare 
fuses! Don't smoke around 
a battery; the bubbles are 
hydrogen! When you do run 
an ac power line, tape it 
down so that you don't trip 
over it. Little pieces of col- 
ored tape help to code 
things such as ground wires, 
coaxes, and connecting 
cords. Be sure to log all 
third-party traffic. Be as 
neat as possible on your 
main log or you find your- 
self wondering whether it 
was a U or a V, and what 
was that other letter? 

I was amazed at the reac- 
tion of the general public to 
the operating amateur sta- 
tion. They seemed in- 
terested in the phone opera- 
tion and somewhat con- 
fused by the CW. Using very 
unscientific sampling 
methods, the "sinkhole 
poll" showed that fewer 
than one in ten realized we 
were operating an amateur 
station. Only those who had 
a relative or friend in 
amateur radio understood 
the capabilities of amateur 
communications. 

We did find spectators 
who were fascinated and 

very interested, however — 
maybe two out of ten peo- 
ple. Many were youngsters 
and teenagers. We fur* 
nished the names of several 
local amateur clubs, a local 
supply company, and mag- 



azine addresses We wished 
we could have offered 

them more information, It 
is our opinion that amateur 
radio needs to do much 
more self-promotion and 
training of interested new- 
comers The type of high- 
visibility operation that we 
carried out is a useful tech- 
nique for raising the level of 
awareness of amateur com- 
munications in the general 
public. 

As a final note, I must say 
that the sinkhole experi- 
ence has been one of the 
most rewarding events of 
my life, and I am happy that 
amateur radio was a big 
part of it- I used to dream 
about the thrills of a far-off 
DXpedition and some re- 
mote island with waves 
crashing against a rocky 
beach. 

There I was, in a tent, with 
the rigs fired up. As I sipped 
on coconut juice and stared 
at the big beams on tempo- 
rary masts, I could hear half 
the amateur radio world 
calling me, amidst the cries 
of the seagulls! Ah, what a 
life! 

Well, now I agree with 
Dorothy when she told the 
Wizard of Oz that she had 
learned her lesson. If I ever 
go searching for someplace 
special, I need only look in 
my own backyard! Sooner 
or later we will all get a 
chance to be in the middle 
of action, and we need to 
be prepared. Your chance 
may be nextlH 



The Special Sinkhole Grew Advisers and Helpers 

Joe Lewi s WB4W PP Ed Cox W9RAO/4 

Gilbert Potyandy K4ISK Jack Leavitl KA4ATV 

Dan Martin KC4GO Fred Hopkins N4EDM 

Joe Lewis demonstrated his skills at a pi leu p that he 
learned while in Saudi Arabia as a field technician. Gilbert 
kept the rigs in repair and offered his technical skills, Danny 
Martin claims he Is going to patent his special Toilet Vent 
Mast! Ed Cox first spotted the hole, and maintains the 
2*meter link. Jack Leavitt and Fred Hopkins kept up the local 
Interest and worked on the certificate. 

The schedule now is sporadic, but normally is around the 
lower end of 20-meter CW (General portion) and 20-meter 
phone. To offer Novices and Technicians a chance, we work 
the lower end of 40 meters and IOmeter Novice CW. An SASE 
will get you the regular schedule by the month. 



—Reader Service tor facing page ^ff?-* 



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Operation Skywarn 

tracking tornadoes with two meters 



0/7/ Richards W&5ZAM 

1925 Juanita St. 

San Angeh TX 76907 



The following is a true 
and factual account, to 
the best of my recollection. 
Time: 1900 hours local 
on a partly cloudy day in 
late May, 

Location: San Angelo, Tom 
Green County, Texas 



frequency 14634/ 94-MHz 
repeater. 

"Well, guys, I'm tired and 
both my batteries and the 
ones in my talkie need a 
good night's recharge, so 
I'm going to pull out If that 
cloud to the west looks like 




Is this a tornado? Members of the Concho Valley Severe Weather Net were not sore, but 
t/iey kept a close eye on the ominous clouds. 

24 73Magazine • April, 1982 



it's going to do anything, 
holler. I'll have the radio on 
but just monitoring. 
KA5BNJ and the group, this 
is W5FZY clear, adios/' 

"OK, Elmer, we'll see 
you. W5FZY clearing, this is 
KA5BNJ. Pick it up Noel 
WD5BHX, this is KA5BNJ/' 

"Break! Break!" 

JI Co ahead break-break, 
this is KA5BNJ/' 

"Sorry to interrupt, John, 
but the Weather Service 
just issued a tornado warn- 
ing for the western part of 
this county and Irion Coun- 
ty [directly to the west of 
Tom Green County]. At 
6:45, DPS [Department of 
Public Safety] reported a 
tornado on the ground 10 
miles north of Mertzon [25 
miles southwest of San 
Angelo] with an apparent 
northeasterly path. If you 
don't mind and there are no 
other volunteers, I'll go 
ahead and assume net con- 
trol and activate the Sky- 
warn Net" 

There were no volunteers, 

"This is WB5ZAM assum- 
ing net control for the Con- 
cho Valley Severe Weather 
Net. Do we have anyone on 
who has information tor the 



net regarding the severe 
weather in the Mertzon 
area? If so, please call net 
control, WB5ZAM/' 

"This is K5JEZ Mertzon 
Bill, we've got winds at 30 
to 35 miles per hour from 
the west and northwest, 
with light rain. We aren't 
able to see very far to the 
north, but there are two 
large thunderheads to the 
west and northwest of me/' 

"This is W5RSV mobile, 
and I'm about 10 miles 
northeast of Charlie, and 
those clouds he's talking 
about are really building 
fast. It hasn't started to rain 
or blow here yet but those 
clouds are very dark and it 
does appear to be raining 
over towards Mertzon/ J 

"Thanks, Charlie and 
Marion. This is WB5ZAM, 
net control for the Concho 
Valley two-meter Severe 
Weather Net r do we have 
any other reports of severe 
weather or anyone who can 
go to the Weather Service 
and man the station there? 
If so call WB5ZAM, net 
control/' 

"This is WD5BHX. Bill, if 
no one else can go, Til 
be free here in a little bit 
and will go out, but I'm 
handie-talkie portable in 
the mall now. WB5ZAM, 
thbisWDSBHX" 

"Thanks, NoeL Is there 
anyone able to man the sta- 
tion at the Weather Service, 
please call now. If there are 
any other reports of severe 
weather, please call now. 
This is WB5ZAM, net con- 
trol for the Concho Valley 
Severe Weather Net/' 

No volunteers spoke up, 

"No takers. Would you 
mind, Noel? I know Art 
could use someone experi- 
enced with the rig and the 
net/' 

"We'll be en route very 
shortly WB5ZAM, this is 
WD5BHX." 

"Thanks, Noel. Do we 
have any other net mem- 
bers with reports of severe 
weather only? Please ca 
net control, WB5ZAM." 

"KA5BNJ." 

"WSOWX." 




^^F ^ ^^ 










5" J^i 


r - - * - 

Ml 44 Hit / 








n i 


~ — m± 



San Angeio, Texas (Tom Green County) and surrounding counties, with the locations of 

local hams. The rings mark ten-mile intervals from San Angelo. 



**i 



Hi 



"Break. This is Art at the 
Weather Service, W5QX." 

Co ahead. Art" 

Gentlemen, we have a 
tornado sighted by a DPS 
trooper, 10 miles north of 
Mertzon with an easterly 
path. We also have a line of 
thunderstorms of marked 
severity extending from 20 
miles northwest of Mertzon 
to 20 miles west of Ozona, 
with a path of movement to 
the east and northeast at 20 
miles per hour These con- 
tain heavy rain and hail and 
do indicate tornadic-type 
winds aloft This is W5QX " 

"Thanks, Art. We have 
activated the net and Char- 
lie reports 30- to 35-mph 
winds with light rain at 
Mertzon, and Marion re- 
ports light winds without 
rain 10 miles northeast of 
him. He does report heavy 
thunderstorms to the west 
Thanks for your informa- 
tion and we do have some- 
one on the way to man the 
radio for you, W5QX this is 
WB5ZAM, net. control for 
the Concho Valley Severe 
Weather Net Do we have 
-sorry, John. KA5BNJ " 



"Bill, we have light rain 
and a westerly wind at 1 to 
15 miles an hour here at 
Carlsbad [20 miles NW of 
San Angelo]. WB5ZAM, this 
is KA5BNJ/' 

"Thanks, John. WSOWX, 
WB5ZAM/' 

"Bill, the weather is 
about the same here, but I 
can hear thunder to the 
west and northwest of me, 
here in Crape Creek [12 
miles NW]. WB5ZAM, this 
is WSOWX." 

"OK, Al. This is 
WB5ZAM, net control Do 
we have other check-ins 
with severe weather reports 
only? Please call WB5ZAM, 
net control/' 

"This is K5JEZ" 
"Co ahead, Charlie/' 

"Bill, the wind has 
changed to the west and 
northwest, at 38 to 40 miles 
an hour—no, there's a gust 
to 50 miles an hour, and we 
have heavy rain now. If I 
lose power, I'll go to the 
mobile and be right back. 
WB5ZAM, this is K5JEZ 
Mertzon." 

"OK, Charlie. Art, did 



you copy? W5QX, 
WB5ZAM?" 

No response. 

"WD5BHX?" 
'Yes, Noel?" 

"Bill, I'm en route to the 
Weather Service now. Art 
probably heard that report 
but was unable to reply as 
he went back to the radar 
I'll have the radio manned 
very shortly. WB5ZAM, 
WD5BHX" 

"OK, Noel This is 
WB5ZAM, net control for 
the Concho Valley Emer- 
gency and Severe Weather 
Net. Do we have other 
reports of severe weath- 
ers—and if not, we'll be- 
gin taking check-ins from 
portables and mobiles, then 
we'll come back to the 
fixed stations. This is 
WB5ZAM/' 

"W5RSV." 

"K5JEZ." 

"Yes, Marion?" 

"Bill, the winds are buf- 
feting the pickup pretty 
good now and we have a 
very heavy downpour here. 
Over/' 

"OK, I'll note that to Art. 
Co ahead, Charlie." 

73 Magazine • April,1982 25 



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TRJONYX IND, INC. 
6219 COFFMAN RD. 
INDIANAPOLIS* IND. 
46288 ^w 
(317) 291-7280 
(317) 291-2995 



"Yeah, this is K5IEZ. The 
rain has let up some, but it's 
still pouring and the winds 
have settled down to 25 to 
30 miles an hour, out of the 
west." 

"Thanks, Charlie K5JEZ 
and W5RSV, this is 
WB5ZAM, net control 

And so it went, with thun- 
derheads building to the 
west and southwest and 
moving in our direction We 
had 46 check-ins: 18 porta- 
bles, 12 mobiles, 14 fixed, 
and 2 via telephone, and 
we watched clouds for 
just over three hours as 
they built up and then 
dissipated. 

This quick response on 
the part of local amateurs 
was not due to our working 
as communicators, but due 
to the weekly practice ses- 
sions, where everyone gets 
a chance to check in, test 
antennas, and even call the 
net, to get the hang of call- 
ing up the group and main- 
taining the net From mid- 
April through mid-June, we 

26 73 Magazine ■ April, 1982 



get the real thing with fre- 
quent storm development 
and the possibility of severe 
weather developing. We 
watch not only for the 
Weather Service-NOAA, 
but for ourselves, the local 
media, and (you would be 
surprised who listens to the 
repeater frequencies during 
severe weather!) the numer- 
ous shortwave listeners 

Due to the size of the 
area we need to watch for 
threatening storms, we in 
the Concho Valley have 
tried to get the best repeat- 
er coverage possible and to 
keep all amateurs informed 
of the frequencies and nets. 
Our net members include 
lawyers, nurses, ranchers, 
retirees, salesmen, house- 
wives, Armed Services per- 
sonnel, executives, and col- 
lege students. We will have 
check-ins from as many as 
70 air miles away and as 
close to the repeater as two 
blocks. The storms that af- 
fect us can build near 
Ozona (70 air miles south- 



west), or to the northwest 
(near Carlsbad or Sterling 
City), or sneak up on us 
from the east, from Paint 
Rock or Ballinger, and can 
include everything from 
rain and wind to hail, high 
winds, and tornadoes. 

Basing our techniques of 
cloud-, wind-, and ram- 
watching on the training 
provided by NOAA's Na- 
tional Weather Service, we 
are able to provide accu- 
rate information to the 
Weather Service and hence 
keep it aware of conditions 
on the ground under the 
clouds, an area where the 
Weather Service radar can- 
not tell the difference be- 
tween blowing dirt and hail. 
To date, we have provided 
not only basic information 
on the storms but also have 
been able to act as indi- 
cators of the severity of 
storms, including the severi- 
ty of the winds and actual 
amounts of rainfall. We 
also have been able to give 
aid when the radar at the 
Weather Service was inop- 
erable, giving warnings of 
high winds and hail as a cell 
moved into the area. 

We found that the best 
way to keep everyone cur- 
rent (as to who lived where 
in our area) was to publish a 
directory of local hams and 
take a highway department 
map and overlay it with 
concentric rings, approxi- 
mating by tens the aeronau- 
tical miles from San An- 
gela The map also has the 
sites of the three 2-meter 
repeaters and the site of the 
450-MHz repeater. We then 
took the maps and used 
them to coordinate tests on 
the emergency-powered re* 
peaters so as to test where 
we could reach the repeat- 
ers with what level of equip- 
ment (i.e, with a one-Watt 
handie-talkie, or 10 or 25 
Watts, or if a directed array 
was necessary). All net and 
club members then were 
given maps, a list of current 
net check-ins, and the op- 
portunity to call up the 
net in the weekly practice 
sessions. 



Since the storms take 
fairly consistent paths, we 
found that a map showing 
the area southwest and 
west would serve better 
than a true circle around 
San Angelo. The map gives 
the net control an idea of 
who lives where in relation 
to a storm cell, and net con- 
trol thus is able to ask these 
specific individuals for in- 
formation on the cell, 
whether it is moving toward 
them, away from them, or 
around them. Then the net 
can ask for mobile stations 
to move to points parallel- 
ing the projected path of 
the storm. Since we have 
only about 60 amateurs ac- 
tive on 2 meters, this map 
gives the net control an 
idea of where each member 
is— especially those in the 
outlying towns. 

The continuing improve- 
ment in the educational ser- 
vices from NOAA has 
helped to train more and 
more amateurs in the Sky- 
warn system and has in- 
creased the number and ac- 
curacy of reports during the 
severe weather months. We 
also installed equipment at 
the Weather Service, giving 
them ready access to the 
net frequency, and have 
worked with them to get 
amateurs into the Weather 
Service during inclement 
weather to give them a 
trained communicator to 
exchange information be- 
tween them and the spot- 
ters of Operation Skywarn. 

So, the next time you 
hear a net caN-up on 2 me- 
ters (or if you haven't tried 2 
meters), go set your FM pub- 
lic service receiver or scan- 
ner to the net frequency; 
when the next severe 
weather system blows in, 
you can watch the storm 
through the eyes of others 
and know whether you are 
going to get a springtime 
shower or a frog-strangler 
You, too, may want to join 
the "professional" ama- 
teurs on the Severe Weatfv 
er/Operation Skywarn nets 
and help keep an eye on the 
storms! 




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73 Magazine • April, 1982 27 



Ben Johnson 

71 Ridgeway Avenue 

Rochester NY 14615 



Measure Ohms with Your 

Calculator? 

yes, and accurately, too! 



Undoubtedly the dumb- 
est electrical measure- 
ment made on a multimeter 
is the one on the high end of 
the Ohms scale, where the 
figures are so crowded 
together that what you read 
is more a matter of faith 
than reality. And then 



there's the zeroing prob- 
lem—was the meter zeroed 
when you started? 

Now, at last; there's a 
better way that doesn't 
crowd readings or require 

rezeroing . .a linear, digital 
ohmmeter with great high- 




Photo A. Clamshell view of the completed calculator 
transformation. The final range capacitor is a 1 -microfarad 
tantalum between switch and module, fust four wires con- 
nect to the calculator circuit proper; they were left long for 
strain relief. The assembly is ready to be closed up and 
used. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 



resistance sensitivity that 
exceeds the 20-megohm 
limit of many commercial 
digital multimeters! 

But the best news is that 
you can put it together 

yourself in a cheap pocket 
calculator! Nowadays 
these little four-bangers are 
frequently on sale for less 



Cr 



SW 



™ 5 



*EAD 



"X" 

r 



ft* 



5 



■* — *- 



than the cost of their indi- 
vidual parts. This amounts 
iO the manufacturer doing 
most of your assembly 
work and providing a pro- 
fessional-looking, compact 
case as well. Try agonizing 
through the alternatives 
and you'll quickly see what 
I mean in terms of the 
cost/benefits ratio All this 



9u 
CALC 

i 



"AWT 
101 1+J 



fti 



HC-lll 
% MODULE F 



-*A^»- 



CI 



Fig. 1. Circuit for converting calculator to measure resis- 
tance. 

Parts List for Fig. 1 

Cf- Filter capacitor, 10-100 uF, electrolytic 

Gr- Range capacitor, polyester, 1-2 uF (see text) 

Ct- Timing capacitor, polyester, + 05 uF 

Rt -Timing resistor, rmnipot, 1 megohm 

Rx — "Unknown" or calibrating resistor, 1 megohm, 1% 

JK — Phone (test) jack, miniature, w/plug and test leads 

SW -Switch, SPOT, miniature, bat handle toggle 

Above parts ate readily available from normal sources. 
RC-111 Module- Available from KaJteK Box 7462 t Rochester NY 
14615 ($14.62 ppd.. plus NY state sales tax if applicable). 




Photo B. Ten wires connect the keyboard to the calculator 
chip/display board. An oscilloscope from ground to each 
wire in turn identified the wires carrying digits pulses. The 
scope between each of these wires and each of the other 
"keys" wires showed which key joined each pair. The table 
shown cracks the code for the keys of interest. The module 
connects to the constant-add pair, numbers 10 and 3. 



Fig, 1 shows the simple 
circuitry needed to trans- 
form your four-function, 
constant-add calculator in- 
to a piece de resistance. So 
few parts are required that 
the whole addition almost 
invariably will fit complete- 
ly inside the original case 
with room to spare. With 
simplicity like this, even the 
nicety of a printed circuit 
board is not worth the extra 
time and effort The only 
external bits of evidence 
that your new instrument 
does more than calculate 
are the actuating switch, 
the test jack, . .and the 
smug look on your face 
when your friends see it do 
its stuff. You may F of 
course, want to exceed the 
bounds of the original case, 
but later. 

How It Works 

The brain of this littte cir- 
cuit is Kaltek's RC-111 hy- 
brid CMOS module with 
eight leads emerging from 
its 2X2X1 centimeter 
package. It utilizes the 
familiar time-constant prin- 
ciple to determine the 
value of the resistor under 
test. The calculator is 
caused to count and thus 
act as a timer to measure 
the time it takes for range 
capacitor Cr to charge 
through the unknown resis- 
tor, Rx. The counting func- 
tion stops at a certain 
charge level on Cr as sensed 
by the high-impedance in- 
put (S) of the module. 



Photo D. A 10~megohm resistor was soldered across the jack 
as an internal reference, anda2-uF range capacitor (blurred) 
was temporarily enlisted to give a 20-second time constant 
for setting the counting speed. At top speed, the count was 
about 220 for the ten-megohm resistor, indicating that the 
range capacitor should be 1 microfarad and the timing pot 
slowed down for a count rate of 1QQ,00Q-Ohms-per-count 
The module lead identity is cast in the sides of the package: 
they were transcribed on the facing surface for clarity. 



is now made possible by a 
newly-available module 
that begins where the 
calculator manufacturer 
left off and does lots 
more. 





Photo C. The main fixtures — module, actuating switch, test 
jack, and count-rate pot —are stuck in the bottom of the 
77-7025 case with hot-melt glue. This stuff is handy and can 
be cut off the stick and melted in place with your soldering 
iron> You don't need to buy the glue gun for the job. 



The counting rate is ad- 
justed by the combination 
of Rt and Ct, so what shows 
up when the display stops 
counting is a number equal 

to the value of Rx, with 
various numbers of decimal 
places determined by the 
size of Cr. Your personal in- 
tervention merely involves 
clearing the display and en- 
tering an initial "1 " to count 
from, then flipping the ac 
tuating switch. Your cal- 
culator retains, unimpaired, 
all of the original functions 
it had, when the display is 
not running or when the test 
leads are removed to short 
the jack. If you have any 
paral lei- or series-resistance 
calculations to make after 
the display shows the value 
of your unknown, you are 
immediately ready to make 
them on the keyboard. 

Construction 

There's really so little to 
do that the circuit diagram 
tells it better than words 
About the only precaution 
is on behalf of the CMOS- 
based RC-111 module, 
which, although protected 
as well as functional re- 
quirements allow, should 
be handled so as to avoid 
any exposure to static elec- 
tricity That is, ground your- 
self and your (non-trans- 
former] soldering iron 
before touching the mod- 
ule leads. Once it's in the 
circuit, it's rather safe (if 
wired as shown, of course). 

For openers, wire the 
module separately as 

shown, with the leads un- 
cut. Their functions are 
identified on the case. You 



Photo E. The only things showing externally are the jack and 
switch and your own look of satisfaction! The author 
plugged a photocell in the jack and used the freshly-built in- 
strument as an enlarging exposure meter to make these 
prints, Only an initial test print was required to get the 
range. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 29 



need to start from some 
convenient known condi- 
tion. For calibration accu- 
racy, a 1% resistor should 
be chosen, somewhere 
around one megohm. For 
ease of handling the correc- 
tive arithmetic, use a 1 -mi- 
crofarad capacitor for Cr, 
of any tolerance, Chances 
are that you'll have to 
change or pad it later, any- 




*-■ 




"CtEAR" «£* 



€L; 



*E V 



Fig. 2. Optional circuit to actuate CLEAR function, enter 1, 
and perform the READ function all from a DPDT switch. 

Parts List for Fig, 2 (see text) 
Rs - .5 to 1 .5 megohm, V* W 
Rp-10 to 22 megohm, % W 
Cp — ,01 uF, ceramic, 10 V 
QC T 1 — NPN silicon transistors, general purpose 
SWa.b- DPDT toggle switch (replaces SPDT of Fig. 1) 



how. The pot (Rt) should be 
at the high-resistance end 
of its span to begin with. 

Now get intimate with 
your calculator. For the 
easiest trip, choose from 
the National Semiconduc- 
tor Corporation's NOVUS 
600 series or their private 
brand equivalents that now 
carpet the terrain like tran- 
sistor radios ("Mathbox," 
for example). Some have 
fixed or switehed-on deci- 
mal points. All have the 
necessary constant-add 
function, which means that 
if you enter a number and 
repeatedly punch the 
"ADD" key, the number 
will be added to itself in the 
display. Other brands with 
this function are also good 
contenders, but these are 
easy to find, cheap, and 
very cooperative The ear- 
lier ones have an 18-DIP 
chip for the calculating, 
designated MM5736; later 
ones have the same charac- 
teristics, but the chip is 
buried under a plastic glob 
on the flip side of the dis- 
play board. 

Some have LED drivers, 



and some don't. That as- 
pect doesn't matter. What 
does matter is how easily 
you can find and identify 
and polarize the leads from 
the CLEAR, 1, and ADD 
keys. The calculator can be 
a |unk-box habitue, and 
many are by now for vari- 
ous reasons. If yours failed 
mechanically on the key- 
board from bad key con 
tacts, you still can use it for 
an ohmmeter and inject 
new life into the old box. 
For a D IP-cased MM5736 
chip, the needed pin identi- 
fications are in Table 1. 

The shared pin in Table 1 
is coincidentally a result of 
the matrixing of the key* 
board; all keys are shared, 
but you won't need the rest 
Chances are if you are com- 
pelled to poke around look- 
ing for the needed ones, 
though, you'll find at least 
half the others first (in 
which case, if I didn't fore- 
warn you, you might be 
non-plussed — minussed, 
even — to discover all these 
funny coincidences your- 
self). 

If your machine isn't old 
enough to have pins, take a 



Key 


Pins 


Called Most-Positive 


Remarks 


ADD 


1-3 


D4-K3 1 (D4) 


All "D" pins generate 


1 


4 17 


K1-D2 17 (D2) 


positive pulses to the 


CLEAR 


2-3 


D14C3 2(D1) 


K pins. ADD and 
CLEAR share pin 3 

|K3). 






Table 1. Pin identifications. 


30 73 Magazine 


• April, 1982 





10k Ohm resistor and use it 
to jump the various key- 
board leads you can spot, 
with a number entered in 
the display for you to watch 
the results on. Or, put your 
scope across the leads and 
poke the keyboard until the 
scope signal shorts A stan- 
dard ohmmeter used with 
calculator power off would 
do the same thing, but I hes- 
itate to recommend putting 
its voltage, however low, on 
a dead section of the chip 
The whole process only 
takes five or ten minutes 
with a resistor, and it's 
harmless. So try that meth- 
od first and as you identify 
the leads and determine 
their polarity from battery 
negative, mark everything 
down with a diagram to 
help you relocate the right 
ones later on. 

To recapitulate, at this 
stage you should have 
found your needed key- 
board leads, identified their 
polarities, and have the 
module circuit wired and 
ready to connect to the cal- 
culator for temporary ini- 
tial testing and calibration. 
With the power off, hook 
the module plus and minus 
leads to the calculator 
power points and set the 
module circuit switch to 
RESET, shorting the range 
capacitor. Now you're 
ready for the fun part, and 
you should make sure your 
battery is reasonably fresh, 
or else use an adapter. The 
MM5736 chip needs at least 
65 volts to operate, but the 
module needs .5 volts 
more, so stay above 7,0 
volts during testing. 

Initial Testing and 
Calibration 

Power up the calculator, 
clear the display, and enter 
a 1 Flip the module switch 
to READ and note that the 
display starts counting up 
from 1 and soon comes to a 
halt. You should then be 
able to enter more digits via 
the keyboard. Press CLEAR 
twice, enter 1 again, and 
flip the switch to RESET 



and then READ. Again the 
display should rack up 
about the same bunch of 
numbers. 

So far, so good. Now you 
have proved that things are 
in working order and you 
can start shooting for the 
fastest counting rate your 
particular calculator chip 
can deliver. While alter- 
nately RESETing and 
READing the switch, twist 
your timing pot {Rt) towards 
minimum resistance to 
speed up the counting rate. 
You may get up to the 
magic limit of about 150 
counts/second, but on 
average you'll hit around 60 
before the display starts do- 
ing strange things like hesi- 
tating, stopping, showing 
EEEEEE, or otherwise not 
counting at a nice even clip. 
Back off on the pot setting 
and start over, babying up 
close to the forbidden 
point. Once you've found 
it r try timing the counts per 
second with a sweep so* 
ond hand clock and record 
the results. You can do this 
most easily by leaving the 
switch at READ and putting 
a jumper across Cr r the 
range capacitor. That'll 
keep it running constantly, 

So much for high speed; 
now you need to adjust 
your range capacitor so 
that the displayed number 
is a few counts higher than 
the value of the calibrating 
resistor. . .probably within 
a couple of decimal places. 
Say your Rx is one megohm 
and your count is 50 when it 
stopped running from a "1" 
start. That means you need 
to double your Cr value 
from its nominal one micro* 
farad to extend the time to 
total 100 or more counts 
Pick a combination of good 
capacitors for Cr that gets 
you there and a little be- 
yond when paralleled with 
Cr. Run a few check counts, 
and then slow the count 
rate with the pot until it 
matches the calibrating re- 
sistor value. You should 
now have the best combi- 
nation of high counting 



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See List of AtS¥ertisers on page i 30 



73Magazine ■ April, 1982 31 



speed and as much resolu- 
tion as your chip can 
deliver. 

For practical purposes, 
you are now ready to make 
a neat mess and pack it into 
the calculator-cum-ohm- 
meter You may, however, 
want to consolidate your 
pile of add-on capacitors in- 
to the fewest number that 
will do the job, Try to stick 
with polystyrene or poly- 
ester caps to minimize 
dielectric absorption, 
which tends to throw off 
your first reading. Or else 
learn to accept the first 
reading and ignore any 
changes in a rapid retest of 
the same resistor. In any 
case, recheck your calibra- 
tion once everthing is 
mounted permanently in 
the calculator case. 

Locate the switch and 
test jack for your conve- 
nience; a thumb-actuatable 
position on the side of the 
case would work well for 
the switch, while the jack 
might be placed on the op- 
posite side, consistent with 
the stuff already in your 
own calculator. 

Error Sources 

Over the 7.0-9. 5-volt 

operating range you'll see a 
readout variation of about 
plus or minus 7%, which is 
quite adequate for most ap- 
plications. If you wish to 
tighten up the precision, a 
zener diode with a bleed 
current of around 30-40 mA 
across the whole circuit — 
calculator and module — 
will hold variations to a 
couple of percent or less. 
This is rather tough on the 
battery, so an ac adapter 
should be considered, 
preferably with zener stif- 
fening if you want to go all 
the way for precision. The 
slight error from the nature 
of the range capacitor 
dielectric has been men- 
tioned; it's not big, but it's 
hard to avoid. 

Real super capacitors 
carry a real super price tag; 
if you're that fussy, maybe 
you should send your un- 

32 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



known resistors to the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards. 
Ceramics are compact and 
cute, but their capacity/ 
voltage effects are impos- 
sible; forget them. If you in- 
tend to use large capaci- 
tance values for Cr in order 
to read low resistances, you 
should stick to tantalums 
and timing-grade types, if 
you can. Regular electro- 
lytics will be quite hope- 
less for a good instrument 
For 1000-Ohms-per-count, 
you'll need some 10-20 uF; 
for 100-Ohms-per-count, 
then about 100-200 uF 
would be required and your 
decade-matching problem 
would get a little sticky. At 
some level, you should best 
accept what your analog 
multimeter can deliver for 
the low resistance readings. 
to avoid fighting the uncer- 
tainties of large capacitors. 

Additional Helps 

Some additional circuitry 
can be incorporated to 
make your instrument more 
nearly a "hands-off" ma- 
chine. That is, you can 
avoid having to clear and 
enter a digit into the display 
by doing it electronically 
when you actuate the RE- 
SET/READ switch, This re- 
finement is shown in Fig. 2 
and calls for a DPDT switch 
in place of the SPOT switch 
shown in Fig. 1. The extra 
pole is used to send a brief 
pulse to the CLEAR key 
when you RESET and an- 
other such pulse to the 1 
key when you READ. The 
capacitors in the transistor 
base legs can be ceramic 
for compactness, but they 
and the resistors in series 
may require a little cut-and- 
try for best performance. 
The parallel resistors across 
the caps can be 10-22 meg- 
ohms. The series resistors 
need to be around .5 meg- 
ohms to 1.5 megohms, de- 
pending on your particular 
capacitor and transistor 
combinations. 

The object is to inject a 
pulse of just sufficient dura- 
tion to clear the display and 



: A L E 
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enter 1 at any operating 
voltage without fail. If the 
pulse is too long, the key 
will hang up excessively 
and, especially, the 1 key 
pulse will subtract counting 
time from the ADD key 
function and cause a low 
readout on your unknown 
resistance. Too short a 
pulse will be more obvious; 
the display will fait to clear 
and/or will not inject a 1 for 
the module to count from. 
Since the symptoms of 
erroneous choices are self- 
evident it isn't too hard to 
land on the right combina- 
tion. The series resistances 
should be on the high side 
to avoid ghosts in the 
display and excessive volt- 
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The transistors can be just 
about any cheap silicon 
general-purpose units, the 
smaller the better, Once 
you have this circuit im- 
provement squared away r 
the RESET/READ switch 
should do everything for 
you and prevent wear and 
tear on the fingertips. 

Experimental Section 

Other brands of calcula- 
tors can be made to yield to 
this circuit scheme, but you 
may find that they have 
slightly different or perhaps 
more recalcitrant charac- 
teristics. Some appear to re- 
quire a heavier current to 



actuate the keys, as evi- 
denced by requiring a lower 
jumper resistor to do the 
job from the circuit side of 
the box. A boosted output 
for the module can be pro- 
vided by a transistor in such 
a case, as shown in Fig, 3. In 
this case, the module D 
lead should be tied to the 
positive supply rail. 

In calculators which 
have the necessary con- 
stant-add function per- 
formed by a third key (re- 
quiring, say, a CLEAR— 1 — 
ADD sequence followed by 
repeats on an EQUALS key, 
for instance), you still have 
the option of either enter- 
ing the three initial keys and 
letting the module drive the 
EQUALS key or using the 
DPDT switch arrangement 
on the 1 and ADD, but leav- 
ing your finger to do the 
clearing. Again, the low-re- 
sistance keying problem 
might be present, which 
generally would result in 
three transistors being used 
for this arrangement. 

Finally, if you have been 
intrigued by all the talk 
about opto-couplers, this 
project might be a useful 
place to start playing, Go- 
ing back to the simple case 
of the module actuating the 
ADD key, you can produce 
this more exotically by 
shunting the key leads with 
a suitable light-dependent 



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73 Magazine * April. 1982 33 



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Fig. 5. Use of crystal timebase for high-precision ohmmeter 
and timer/stopwatch functions. 



resistor (LDR) facing an LED 

operated by a transistor- 
boosted output from the 
RC-111 module as shown in 
Fig. 4. This scheme gives 
you a tot of potential design 
freedom, because the only 
necessary connection be* 
tween the module circuit 
and the calculator can be a 
light beam, Consequently, 
if the gods and what not are 
in your favor, you can op- 
erate the module on one 
battery (by itself, St only 
consumes a couple of milli- 
amps, and only while 
counting) while the calcu- 
lator operates on its own 
original supply, which can 
then include those situa- 
tions beyond the 3-15-volt 
requirements of the mod- 
ule. 

There are two precau- 
tions First, the LDR has to 

act with reasonable speed 
in crossing from low resis- 
tance (to actuate the key) 
while illuminated by the 
LED to high resistance (for 
about an equal time) to let 
go of the key. Second, the 
LED has to be able to light 
the LDR sufficiently to ef- 
fect the necessary low resis- 
tance, which means that it 
may require a pretty good- 
sized jolt of current to do 
the job. So, a satisfactory 
functional matchingof LDR 
and LED is necessary and 
requires a little horsing 
around to get things just 
right. 

Some LDRs are rather 
slow, and this might mean 
sacrificing some counting 
speed to incorporate this 

design. On the other hand, 
you may hit fat city and 
find that, for example, a 
fast and cheap photo-diode 
or photo-Darlington transis- 

34 73 Magazine ■ April, 1982 



tor will work just fine in 
your situation. Then you're 

home free- But you see why 
I entitled this part as an ex- 
perimental section. As a 
hobbyist, you should be 
allowed to feel intrepid 
On the other hand, I am 
obliged to state the dis- 
claimers. I have to disclaim 
any responsibility for what 
you may do on your own 
hook. Fortunately, I have 
found so far that most cal- 
culators are very forgiving 
about all the rooting 
around in their guts. 

Some Freebies 

A number of non-ohm- 
meter possibilities may 
have become apparent by 
the time you have read this 
far. Yes, the module/calcu- 
lator combo makes a pretty 
dandy and simple counter 
or timer or stopwatch, with 
or without the ohmmeter 
function. The timing will 
continue ad nauseam as 
long as module lead S is 
tied or switched to the posi- 
tive supply rail and stop 
when it is on the negative 
rail. A second timing pot 
could be switched in to pro- 
duce a timing speed more 
attuned to your needs. 

Almost any calculator 
candidate should run fast 
enough to count by sec- 
onds; most will count by 
tenths, and some will make 
it to 01-second-per-count 
or beyond. For your own 
needs you might want to 
consider hundredths of 
minutes or even milli-hours 
or the like. Astronomers 
might even want to shoot 
for microsidereal-day time, 
in an extreme case, Al- 
though not crystal con- 
trolled, the precision is not 



bad with reasonable volt- 
age regulation and can be 
set vyith an oscilloscope 
against multiples or sub- 
multiples of the 60-Hz line. 
For the calculator chips 
that can reach to 60 Hz or 
100 Hz, one of the cute lit- 
tle boards that provides 
such with crystal control 
can be purchased for 
around $5.00 and run from 
most calculator power sup- 
plies The output can be 
tied to the module as shown 
in Fig. 5, connected to the I 
lead while the P and C leads 
are left open. 

Once you can measure 
Ohms digitally, you also 
can measure the ohmic re- 
lationships of other de- 
vices, of course. Therefore, 
this means that you can es- 
tablish a relationship with 
light and temperature, to 
cite the most obvious 
examples. The aforemen- 
tioned LDRs can be used to 
measure light, and at ex- 
tremely low levels, So can a 
whole raft of other devices: 
photo-diodes, photo-tran- 
sistors, and even plain 
LEDs. In these cases, the 
lower the light level, the 
higher the reading dis- 
played, and if you have a 
big range capacitor, it 
might take minutes for the 
display to stop running if it 
is dutifully trying to count 
all the hundreds of 
megohms an LDR can reach 
at low light levels. 

For this application I 
have found that a tiny 
220-picofarad range capac- 
itor worked about right for 
modest but useful counts 
when making enlargements 
in my darkroom Because 
of the inverse lightcount 
relationship, this combina- 
tion is more properly a 
dark-meter, but that's be- 
side the point. In effect, it 
reads out a number propor- 
tional to the right expo- 
sure . that's the bottom 
line in the photographic 
application. The LDR could 
optionally be connected to 
replace the timing pot (Rt) 
with a fixed combination of 



Cr and Rx chosen to time 
for a few seconds. In such a 

case you would get a read- 
ing that increased as the 
light intensity increased; 
however, in too-b right tight, 
the calculator chip count- 
ing rate would be exceeded 
and the display would show 
funny results. With the LDR 
as Rx in the ohmmeter cir- 
cuit, the excessive light in 
tensity would register only 
your originally-entered 1 
and would create less con- 
fusion. 

A precaution about 
LDRs: As well as being a lit- 
tle slow, they have varying 
degrees of memory, so they 
don't immediately settle 
down on the first reading 
after a shift in light level. 
The fastest ones get there 
well enough to be extreme- 
ly useful, but you would de- 
tect the discrepancy on a 
succession of readings. 
Thermistors are decidedly 
non-linear, and it takes 
some extra fooling around 
with the circuitry to get 
them to put out real tem- 
perature readings over a 
useful span. Ideally, you 
would fortify yourself with 
a calibration curve, or 
"normalize" the applica- 
tion. 

If, for instance, you want 
to display a single photo- 
developer temperature dig- 
itally, and always use that 
temperature, the ther- 
mistor/range capacitor 
combination could be 
made to display "100" at 
the chosen temperature, 
from which you could em- 
pirically set acceptable lim- 
its from this value to suit 
the precision requirements 
for your needs. 

Hams develop other situ- 
ations for themselves in 
which a digital display of 
the results could be useful. 
An azimuth readout could 
be provided for an antenna, 
for example, by tying a suit- 
able pot to the rotating an- 
tenna shaft as the Rx gen- 
erator and scaling the dis- 
play relationship to read 
out the number of degrees 






representing the direction. 
Or, with a linear pot as the 
unknown, you could make 
a digital micrometer of 
sorts The mind boggles at 
the prospects. 

Perhaps the most imme- 
diately useful takeoff on 
the ohm meter is the alter- 
native of making the range 
capacitor the unknown and 
scaling with resistors in the 
Rx position to provide a few 
decades of readability, A 
megohm or two will give a 
display in microfarads to 
two decimal places. A com- 
mensurately longer string 
of resistors can enable you 
to reach to 100-picofarads- 
per-count and read micro- 
farads on the same scale to 
too many decimal places to 
be of practical interest— 
and taking that much more 
time to count as well 

The switching require- 
ments to make a combined 
ohmmeter/capacimeter are 
not horrendous, but to do 
a really good job, you 



would want to consider a 
bigger case to accommo- 
date range switching. If you 
have a dead-keyboard cal- 
culator to start with, per 
haps try putting in a huge 
LED display in plate of the 
usual small one. With com- 
mercial capacimeters sell- 
ing for about ten times the 
cost of the Kaltek module, 
you can do almost as much 
(except for the teeny 
capacitances) and have the 
advantages of the digital 
ohm meter in the bargain. 

Conclusion 

I could goon and on until 
the applications for the 
RG111 module were limit- 
ed by my imagination. But 
it seems fitting to leave off 
as above and tell you that 
the applications are limited 
by your imagination. In any 
event this little device has 
a truly impressive cost- 
benefit ratio, and I'm confi- 
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^See List ot Atf reisers on page 130 



73 Magazine * April, 1982 35 



/ames L Campion NT A AD 
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Federal Way WA 98O03 



Scanning with the IC-280 



How many times have 
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Fig. 7. 



inr pv*> 

IC-280 schematic diagram showing microprocessor and control input circuitry. 



costs about 525 maximum, 
and mounts inside the con- 
trol head 

Two-meter transceivers 
as a class have been trend- 
ing towards the low current 
drain of CMOS control cir- 
cuitry, notably synthesizers 
and attendant display cir- 
cuits with external control 
capability. The earliest ex- 
ample of this type of trans- 
ceiver in the Icom line was 
the IG22S which, for the 
first time, offered hams the 
ability to interface their rigs 
with a wide variety of hard- 
ware. Since then, several 
advances have been made, 
the latest of which incor- 
porates a microprocessor 
into the control function, 

Before proceeding fur 
ther, one point should be 
emphasized. The micropro- 
cessor in the IC-280's con- 
trol head resembles less a 
hobbyist's computer sys- 
tem (8080, 6800, Z80, etc) 
and more the type found in 
a calculator The chip is 
from Texas Instruments' 
TMS 1000 series of micro- 
processors which have all 
RAM and ROM in the same 
package and cannot access 
external memory of any 
kind. The ROM is mask-pro- 
grammed at the factory and 
cannot be changed. 

Nevertheless, it offers 
enormous flexibility (from 
the designer's point of view) 
in that it can be tailored for 
any type of control func- 
tion in any type of system 
that can be imagined. 



36 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



Flexible for the engineer 
but pretty well set for the 
user, right? Well, not quite. 

The secret of enhancing 
the control capability of 
such a system lies in the 
realization that while the 
microprocessor is pro- 
grammed for a limited num- 
ber of control functions, 
these same functions need 
not be accessed via me- 
chanical switches but elec- 
tronically instead, upon 
command of other signals 
within the transceiver. In 
short, it is very easy to 
cause the radio to tell itself 
what to do. 

Theory of Operation 

To understand how the 
scanner works, it is neces- 
sary to describe how data 
gets entered into the micro* 

processor. 

The type of input used is 
called a scanning matrix. 
Basically, this means that 
there are just four lines (K,, 
K 2 , K 4# K B ) where informa- 
tion will go into the chip, 
However, due to internal 
circuits, the data input lines 
accept only certain types of 
information at certain 
times. These times coincide 
with a high R strobe, only 
one of which is positive at 
any given time. 

For instance, of the four 
strobe lines we are interest- 
ed in (R -R 3 ) for data input, 
we will assume that the R 
strobe has just gone high, or 
positive. Strobes R 7 -R a then 
are at a low, or ground po- 
tential For the period of 
time that R<, is high, the data 
fines K lf K 2 , K 4 , and K & are 
interested only in data from 
the optical chopper regis- 
ter. This data will cause the 
frequency to increase, de- 
crease, or remain un- 
changed and is updated at 
the strobe rate of about 1 25 
pps (pulses per second). 

Referring to the IC-280 
control-head schematic in 

Fig, 1 , it can be seen that the 
data lines are physically 
connected to a variety of 
switches and circuits. The 
reason that data from the 




Data Input Lines 



Strobe/ Function 

When dial is se- 
lected and RO is 
isiiive 




N/C 



N/C 



11 is the sim/dup 
strobe. When it is 
high and the dup. 
function switches 
are set, the fol- 
lowing occurs 

With memory- 

write switch 
depressed and R2 
high 

If R3 is high and 
the memory-chan- 
nel switch is set 
as follows: 



N/C 



High If dup 
and in Tx 




High if 
-600 kHz 



High it 
+ 600 kH; 



High 



N/C 



High regardless 
of memory write 



HfC 



High if Ch> 1 



High if Ch. 2 



High if Ch. 3 



N/C 



Table 7, input data codes for microprocessor IC-7 in the IC-280 control head. 



chopper register is not gar- 
bled by these other compo- 
nents is that the common 
contact of each switch is 
connected to the strobe ap- 
propriate to its function. 
When the R line is high and 
all other strobes are low, 
each low strobe is prevent- 
ed from sinking current or 
pulling down voltage on the 
lines by means of a block- 
ing diode. 

When the R! line goes 
high, only data correspond- 
ing to that strobe is generat- 
ed- Next, the R t strobe goes 
low and R 2 goes high, and 
so on The function of each 
line in the matrix is listed in 

Tablet. 

The scanner-module 
schematic is shown in Fig. 2. 
The switch section at the 
bottom of the diagram is 
the last section of the 
channel-select switch (see 
Fig, 1)- The common con- 
tact normally connected to 
the R strobe is now con- 
nected to the power switch 
through a resistor, R29, This 
allows the use of the switch 
section to select the dial 
mode in either the D or CH 
3 positions by using analog 
switch S1 to perform the 
previous function of the 
channel switch. Thus, when 
the D position is selected, 
the transceiver operates 
normally. 

However, with suitable 
modifications to the other 



two sections of the channel 
switch in the CH 3 position, 
the voltage now available 
from the last section in the 
CH 3 position is used to turn 
on analog switch 52 in the 
scanner, allowing pulses to 
pass through it. Analog 
switch S3 is normally 
turned on in the receive 
mode and will allow pulses 
from analog switch 52 to go 
to the chopper circuit. S3 is 
turned off in transmit, pre- 
venting scanning. 

In the scanning position, 
a positive voltage is con- 
nected to pin 4, IC5 in the 
control head, which is the 
RESET input for the up/ 
down flip-flop in the optical 
chopper circuit. Since the 
voltage causes the Q out- 
put to be forced low, the 
microprocessor always 
counts down. 

To make the scanner 
count up, the SET line must 
receive the positive voltage 
while the RESET line is 
grounded. However, the 
scanner's performance is 
the same in either mode 
and it is easier to wire the IC 
to count down, 

When the 280 receives a 
signal, a dc voltage im- 
posed on the audio line is 
transmitted from the 
squelch circuit to the base 
of Q11, causing its collec- 
tor to be grounded. The re- 
ceive LED whose cathode is 
connected to the collector 



of Q11 is then lit The col- 
lector of Q11 is also con- 
nected to terminal 11 of the 
scanner which in turn is 
connected to pin 12 of IC3, 
the input on a NAND gate. 
If pin 13, the other input to 
the NAND gate, is high, 
then the output on pin 11 
will go to ground A negative 
spike is then generated by 
C 4 and R 7 and is used to trip 
the monostable multivibra- 
tor which consists of two 
NOR gates from IC1 and C5 
and R8, whose time con- 
stant will roughly deter- 
mine the length of pause on 
an occupied channel. The 
values shown will yield 
about 9 seconds R8 can be 
decreased to 50k Ohms to 
generate shorter pause 
times. 

When the monostable is 
tripped, pin 10 of IC1 goes 
to ground, which pulls 
down the control line of an- 
alog switch S2 through D4. 
This action stops the pulses 
going to the chopper cir- 
cuit, and the transceiver 
will stay on the channel un- 
til the one-shot resets. 

The monostable circuit 
will not respond to further 
trip pulses on its input after 
the original spike so that 
the practical result is for 
the scanner to stop for a 
fixed length of time on an 
occupied channel no mat- 
ter how many times the 
squelch is broken. 

73 Magazine • Aprit, 1982 37 




Fig. 2. Scanner module schematic. 



H C 







ORANGE 



ORANGE 



REfi 



6RtSW 



tq rc-s F • ■ 

TO PWR 

VW THROUGH SZKft 




__v '__ 



ft£D 






13*15 
16 



17 

18 



No change. 

Remove cathode of diode. Remove 2 orange wires 
and splice with orange wire from module. Leave this 
tab unconnected. 
No change. 

Remove anode of diode (its cathode was removed 
from tab 5). Install cathode of new diode and blue 
wire from module. 
No change. 

Connect the yellow 6" wire (not from the module) 
and anode of the diode whose cathode was con- 
nected to tab #7. 

Remove violet wire and splice to violet wire from 
module. Install the 3" red wire (goes to power switch 
through 22k). 
No change. 

Remove anode of diode connected to tab 17 and 
connect it to this tab. This will leave tab 17 uncon 

M&tcL 
See tab 16. 
No change. 




Fig. 3. Channel switch pictorial and modification instruc- 
tions (rear view). 

30 73Magazine • April, 1982 



The astable multivibra- 
tor, whose output is fed to 
analog switch 52, has two 
speeds selected by analog 
switch $4. When S4 is on, 
more capacitance is con- 
nected in parallel with C2 
and C3, lengthening the 
time constant and lowering 
the output repetition rate, 
When S4 is off, the repeti- 
tion rate increases. 

The reason for the two 
pulse rates is that in the 
146-148-MHz portion of the 
band, the set tunes in 15- 
kHz steps, and the 143- 
145.99-MHz portion tunes 
in 5-kHz increments. To 
keep the time spent in the 
lower portion of the band 
more or less equal to that 
spent in the upper portion, 
the scan rate must increase. 
The fastest scan rate is used 
if one is not interested in 
the lower portion of the 
band; a more moderate 
speed is used to detect oc- 
cupied frequencies below 
146 MHz, and 146-148 MHz 
are always scanned at the 
same rate, 

If one wishes to receive 
signals in the 143-145.99- 
MHz range, two contradic- 
tory problems are apparent 
First, if the scan rate is too 
fast, the scanner will not re- 
liably stop on frequency — 



if it stops at all. If the rate is 
slow enough to stop reli- 
ably, the unit will spend a 
much greater period of 
time in a portion of the 
band which is relatively 
unused. The solution is to 
connect NAND gates, one 
of which is used as an in- 
verter, to terminals 5 and 8 
of the scanner and turn ana- 
log switch S4 on or off, de- 
pending on the state of the 
inputs. 

Terminal 5 of the module 
is connected to the R4 line 
which is low when the kHz 
digit is 5 and high when the 
digit is 0. ff the Hi/Lo power 
button is pushed in, termi- 
nal 8 is high This means 
that analog switch S4 will 
be off when the kHz digit is 
5 and the astable will have 
a high repetition rate. When 
the kHz digit is 0, the 
astable will take a longer 
time to change state. There- 
fore, a minimum time is 
spent on frequencies end- 
ing in 5 kHz and a maxi- 
mum time on all others 
when below 146 MHz. 

If terminal 8 is grounded 
(Hi/Lo button out), the scan- 
ner will be in the high-scan 
rate all the time unless ter- 
minal 1 goes high and turns 
on analog switch 54 
through D2, slowing the 
scan rate. Terminal 1 is con- 
nected to the Bj line [R B line 
from IC7) which goes high 
from 146 MHz to 148.11 
MHz. The connection be- 
tween pins 2 and 13 of IC3 
on the module ensures that 
if terminal 8 is grounded, 
squelch breaks will not stop 
the scanner below 146 
MHz, but will pause appro- 
priately above 146 MHz. 

Construction 

Construction of the sin- 
gle-sided PC board is rather 
straightforward, and the 
foil layout is shown in Fig. 4 
Wire color is specified in 
the schematic in Fig. 2 t and 
component layout in Fig. 5. 
Tolerances are not critical; 
however, the components 
specified in the parts list fit 
the PC board. Since the 







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^H 



module is installed compo- 
nent side down, hookup 
wires should come out on 



aU^ a „^ a 



_U_ *-X — i_L 



and be careful not to strip 
the heads of the screws, 
which are generally quite 



*-*- 



• 



■ * 




-Q^L 



1 



-I- 




f/g. 6. Microprocessor and control board modifications location. 



the leads of the CMOS IC in 
the head and also the tab 
on the memory-channel 

switch which has the yellow 



Parts List 
C1 .OIhiF, 12-voJt ceramic 
disc 

C2 .0047-uF, 12-volt 

ceramic disc 
C3 ,1-uF, 12-vgU ceramic 

disc 
C4 1-uF, ifrvolt electrolytic 

PC mount (aluminum or 

tanlalum) 
C5 10-uF, Ifrvolt electro- 
lytic PC mount 

(aluminum or tantalum) 
D1-D7 1N4148 or equivalent sil- 
icon 
ICI 4001 CMOS quad, NOR 
IC2 4016 CMOS quad, ana* 

log switch 
IC3 4011 CMOS quad. 

NAND 
R1 1.3M, 1/4-Watt carbon 

film 
R2-R7 47k. 1/4-Watt carbon 

film 
R8 1M. 1/4-Watt carbon film 
R9 120K, 1/4-Watt carton 

film 
R10 22k, l/4*Watt carbon 

film 
Misc.— PC board, solder 
12 ea, 26- or 28-gauge stranded, 
plastic covered wire in 5" 
lengths in 12 primary colors 
and pastels in pink and in 
light green 
1—26- or 28-gauge stranded 
plastic covered wire 6" in 
lenath. vellow 



wire connected — it may be 
shorting to the metal frame 

To activate the scanner, 
select position 3 on the 
memory-channel switch. 
Do not be alarmed if noth- 
ing happens at first, but 
after about 10 seconds the 
digits will start counting 
down. 

If the Hi/Lo power button 
is OUT, the scanner will 
pause again after changing 
from 146,00 MHz to 
145.995 MHz whether or 
not a signal is received. 
After the pause, it should 
start counting rapidly 
downward until reaching 
148/11 MHz, where it will 
count at a much slower 
rate* 

When the Hi/Lo button is 
OUT and the displayed fre- 
quency is below 146.00 
MHz and after the initial 
pause, a squelch break will 
not stop the scanner. 

When the Hi/Lo button is 
IN, a squelch break (accom- 
panied by the lighting of the 
Receive LED) should stop 
the scanner both above and 
below the 146,00-MHz 
boundary. 

If these conditions can- 
not be obtained, check the 
input gate to the mono- 
stable on the module and 
also see if the cathode of 



scanner should always stop, 
thus preventing unwanted 
interference to others. 

If a signal generator is 
available, hook it up to the 
antenna connector of the 
280 and check to see that 
the scanner will stop on the 
right frequency. This check 
can also be performed us- 
ing off-the-air signals if their 
frequency is known. If the 
scanner stops too late, in- 
crease the value of C3 by 
.001 uF to .005 uF. 

Here are some ways the 
scanner may be used. 

If the scanner pauses on 
a frequency of immediate 
interest, select position D 
on the memory-channel 
switch. This will be the 
same frequency as in the 
scanner position. Be sure to 
select the proper mode of 
duplex or simplex before 
transmitting. 

If the scanner pauses on 
a frequency of less immedi- 
ate interest, select either 
position 1 or 2 on the mem- 
ory-channel switch and 
press the memory button to 
store the frequency. Select 
position 3 to resume scan- 
ning. 

If a signal is received 
above 146.000 MHz and is 
not on the 15/30 kHz band 

nlan fh*> ^rarvnpr will nanca 



will be quite readable. 
However, before transmit* 
ting the transceiver-tuning 
increments should be 
changed to 5-kHz steps ac- 
cording to the supplemen- 
tal operator's sheet en- 
closed with the IC-280 in or- 
der to obtain the correct 
operating frequency. 

Summary 

With a few hours time 

and $10 to $25 invested, de- 
pending on where the parts 
are obtained, a reliable and 
simpie-to-operate scanner 
can be added to the IG280 
without drilling holes or 
otherwise destroying the 
front panel. To date, seven 
scanners have been built 
using the above data and 
have been working with no 
problems. 

For those who elect not 
to make the PC board, an 
assembled and tested mod- 
ule may be obtained by 
sending me a check or mon- 
ey order for $25. Etched 
and drilled PC boards only 
are available for $15. 

Brief technical questions 
on the scanner can be an- 
swered only if you send me 
an SASE 

I would like to acknowl- 
edge the invaluable assis- 






fan/"Q *-*■»* 



.„ U- 



It 





VFO 



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■jt ippitJiamate uiil iu- <hj?r Without notice V Mgnifici: oed I'CC rcguUrinn'-. limiting tpurwnii, eoHiiianv 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial t>y Wayne Green 



from page 8 

what to do about it, and lodging 
official complaints is not the 
answer. We've been that route 
for years, 

The best solution to a nag- 
ging problem like this is to at- 
tack. Let's get organized and 
see what we can do to drive the 
dreaded dragon off our ham 
bands. If we work together, we 
can do it. And, yes, I'm sug- 
gesting some deliberate inter- 
ference. Sauce for the goose. 

Despite a lot of science fic- 
tion baloney about the wood- 
pecker signals being used lor 
behavior modification, all it is is 
long-range radar. The only 
behavior modified is the DX op- 
erators who start climbing the 
walls. 

Okay, it's radar. Those of you 
who have an inkling of how ra- 
dar works know the answer to 
the problem already. It's simple. 
If you want to screw up a radar 
signal, all you have to do is send 
a return signal on its frequency 
which blocks out the echos. 
Hams, from the earliest wood- 
pecker days, have been driving 
the monster off their bands by 
getting on the frequency and 
sending properly spaced dots 
back. The screen somewhere in 
Russia blanks out and the 
operators utter some Russian 
oaths and change the frequency 
to get rid of the interference* 

Now, if you chaps would get 
together into some networks to 
spot and erase this blight we 
could get Ivan off our ham 
bands for good. You need a key- 
er which can be adjusted to 
send back pulses in between the 
woodpecker ticks. 

There are a number of these 
pests around Russia, so you 
may have your hands fuil for a 
while. With persistence, 1 think 
they will stay out of our bands 
and go elsewhere for their radar 
work. 

Or you can look on the bright 
side of things as you gnash your 
teeth over the noise. There is a 
good deal of evidence that the 
very high power transmitters be- 



ing used for this work are having 
an effect upon the people im- 
mediately in its path. Indeed, 
one of the major woodpecker 
transmitter sites is just across 
the border from Finland and the 
Incidence of cancer in the near- 
by Finnish town is reported to be 
exceptionally high. At this dis- 
tance, all we get is apoplexy. 

THE DANNALS DEAL 
To say that I'm disappointed 
in a bunch of readers is to 

understate the case. I've gotten 
a lot of flack for my strong sup- 
port of Dannals for the new 
general manager of the League 
and I think this needs to be 
brought out into the open. 

Now look here. , .1 think that 
some loyalty to the president of 
the League is in order and I don't 
want any more of those letters 
telling me that good old Harry is 
a pompous fathead, Harry and 
his father before him have been 
ARRL directors. Could you ask 
for any more loyalty than that? 

And it you're worried about 
your League getting into trou- 
ble, just remember that Harry ts 
already retiring from his lifetime 
of work as a union steward, so a 
couple of years as general man- 
ager of the League isn't going to 
make a lot of difference. Isn't it 
about time that a loyal sup- 
porter like that had a chance to 
get a decent salary for a year or 
two. , , and an unlimited ex- 
pense account? Not to mention 
a very generous retirement from 
the League in a few years. That 
retirement pay plus his first 
retirement pay should allow 
Harry to go on as many DXpedi- 
tions as he wants without any 
further worry about money. It's 
only a few bucks out of your 
pocket, so why be chintzy? 

Remember that amateur ra- 
dio is in the doldrums right now. 
ITs not the worst doldrums 
we've had. . . those were back in 
1964-69... but they're pretty 
del. Thus it really isn't going to 
make a big difference what the 
ARRL does for a while, so why 
get exercised? I say give Harry 
his due and stop all the beefing. 



It is hard to stop the rumor 
mill, but I really don't put any 
credence in the gossip that 
Harry will be moving HQ to New 
York so it will be closer to his 
home, Of course, that would be 
a bit closer to Washington, 
where it really should be. . .but 
not close enough, Yes r I know 
that they don't need that huge 
building any more and that it is a 
bear as far as heating goes, But 
remember that the building 
didn't cost the League much 
since it was paid for by member 
building fund donations. With 
the staff cutbacks, they could 
make do with a lot smaller HQ 
building, or perhaps Harry will 
rent part of the building out to 
economize. 

So let's not hear any more of 
this heresy and bad-mouthing of 
Harry, okay? Some of the things 
he's done have given the impres- 
sion that he doesn't have both 
oars in the water, but that may 
be because you don't have all of 
the facts. Take heart and re- 
member thai even if Harry turns 
out to be as inept as Baldwin 
has appeared, the League will 
still survive. Not to worry. 

ARRL ATTACKED 
Those few of us who are still 
reading HR were aghast at the 
February vicious attack against 
the ARRL in the editorial. What 
is the world coming to? This 
would never have happened 
under the guidance of good old 
Jim Fisk, who was able to 
stomach anything the ARRL did. 

Ham Radio magazine, which 
has been dropping steadily in ad 
support, had some corking good 
articles in February. . .too bad if 
you missed them and the ARRL 
attack, For instance, there was 
a pip of an article on how to use 
the HP-34C computer to design 
Pl-L matching networks, some- 
thing which I'm sure has 
plagued all of us. Those pages 
of charts will be of incalculable 
vafue to thousands of hams who 
prefer to design their own 
matching networks and put 
them in place of the factory-buiU 
circuits in our sideband rigs. 

Another spell-binder was a 
772-page article on the sys- 
tematic design of crystal ladder 
filters, ril bet they thought I'd 
forgotten all that calculus I was 
crammed with 40 years ago in 
college. .. well, here's where I 
could finally get it out and use it 
You can bet that hams will be 
quoting that article for several 
years to come. 



With the thermometer outside 
my window hovering at - 10*; I 
read with amusement their 
state-of-the-art rotator ar* 
tide.*. using a rope going 
through two holes in the house 
to the beam. The two rope holes 
would let out enough heat to pay 
for a rotator in one winter here. 

Well, Tm sure we're all glad to 
see HR hanging in there. . , even 
after losing both Ham Horizons 
and Ham Radio Report. 

BUILDING 

One of the ways in which 
radio amateurs have been of 
value to the country down 
through the years has been in 
their designing and building of 
new equipment. It's been a while 
since I've polled the 73 readers 
to see what percentage are into 
building, but the last poll 
showed that 80% had built at 
least one home construction 
project during the previous year. 

The high percentage of ads 
for parts in 73 indicates that you 
readers are still building today. I 
donl think there is any other 
magazine with more ads for 
parts. Building is one of the 
more fun things to do in our hob- 
by, so Td like to do all I can to en- 
courage more of it. 

You know. It doesn't take a lot 
of technical knowledge to get 
started building. Once you get 
into it, you find that you are 
learning every day. It's a great 
fun way to learn the technical 
end of things. . . learn by doing. 
Then, when you get on the air, 
you have something real to talk 
about. You can beef over the 
problems you had in getting 
something to work, knowing 
that the chap on the other end is 
eating his heart out that he 
doesn't have a similar story to 
swap because he has bought 
everything he is using. 

To help get more hams into 
building, I'm asking that 
everyone who has designed and 
built something unique write it 
up and send in the article, It's 
your responsibility to encourage 
more hams to build, and only a 
wealth of interesting projects 
will do this. Writing the articles 
Is up to you. I'll publish them. 

When I started 73, it was with 
the idea of promoting ham 
building. Down through the 
years, 73 has always been the 
builder's magazine. We have 
used the space QST wastes on 
those endless activity reports to 
publish articles and more ar- 
ticles, a good percentage of 



44 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



them on small construction proj- 
ects which can be done in a 
weekend. Now, with MR rapidly 
fading away, we'll be running a 
few more of the back-breaking 
type of construction projects for 
which they were justly famous. 
We don't want them to stop just 
because MR is fading away. 

Hams are builders* The more 
construction projects you send 
in for us to publish, the more 
you'll get in 73. I would like to 
see articles on aft as- 
pects. . .simple projects and 
engineering masterpieces, I'd 
like to see 'em on digital cir- 
cuits, gadgets for the home, for 
the car, antennas, tuners, 
automatic identifiers, new slow- 
scan circuits, color slow scan, 
and so on. We are perhaps five 
hundred articles behind on what 
I would like to see in RTTY 
developments. 

There are some smaff groups 
working on ever more exciting 
repeater networking systems. 
Let's see articles on these which 
will spur other groups to get into 
the game. Let's see articles on 
the networking circuits. I don't 
know if you know about it, but 
there are at least a couple of 
ham UHF networks which con- 
nect virtually all of the western 
part of t he cou nt ry together. You 
can use an HT in San Diego and 
talk to El Paso or up to Oregon, 
ail without Interrupting local re- 
peater operations along the way. 

No one has figured out how to 
get from the Rockies east with 
these nets so far. The short hops 
in the f fatiands have temporarily 
stopped the spread of these 
systems. Perhaps we can have 
some ideas on that, . .and more 
construction projects. 

You design it t build it, and 
write about it . . . and III publish 
rt t getting thousands of hams to 
bulid your circuits. 

GOOD ARRL NEWS! 

Just when I begin to get 
discouraged over the slowness 
of the League to react to 
technology and other changes, 
something interesting comes 
along. In this case, there is a 
report in a well-known DX 
bulletin to the effect that some 
badly needed changes in DX 
contest rules have been made. 

The piece reports that the 
ARRL contest advisory commit- 
tee in a vote of 8 to 3 has decid- 
ed to modify the operating 
periods of both the CW and the 
phone DX contests to allow two 
additional hours of operation for 



both the first and second 
district stations. They noted 
that during the last few years 
the East Coast has come very 
close to losing its dominance in 
this event and the committee 
felt that this rule change would 
ensure that the traditions of the 
past are preserved. Bravo f 

Anyone with comments pro or 
con should contact QST about 
this. I think we should continue 
to look to the League to preserve 
past traditions and look to 73 to 
preserve traditions yet to come. 

FAVORS 

Most of us have read some of 
the reports from the FCC on the 
trial and conviction of one of 
their licensing people for selling 
ham licenses. A lot of hams got 
furious when they heard about 
that. 

After talking with some of the 
people who were intimately in- 
volved, a rather different story 
from the official version is told. 
It appears that there has been a 
good deal of cover-up of actions 
by higher FCC people who seem 
to have started the whole mess. 
Tve read the official reports 
and got the impression that this 
chap Zigler had been selling 
ham licenses and got caught, 
and that there were just a few 
bad hams involved. 

This is reported to have got- 
ten started when Prose Walker, 
who was the chief of the ham 
division of the FCC, started ask- 
ing Zigler to do some "favors" 
for friends of his— upgrading of 
licenses, special calls. Zigler ap- 
parently got fed up with this 
after a while and told some of 
his close ham friends about the 
situation and asked if they had 
any special cases who might 
need a favor, as long as he was 
doing favors. No money was in- 
volved with any of this. One 
chap I talked with swears he 
was in the room with Zigler 
when Walker called with a re- 
quest for five more friends of his 
to get favors. 

Things mushroomed, with the 
final count being 843 favors 
granted by Zigter. That's more 
than a few. Eventually the word 
got around and Zigler T s friends 
began getting cash offers for 
upgrading of their tickets. Then, | 
after a while, some of the friends 
were sending Zigler cash, It's 
tough to send back unac- 
counted-for cash. 

Someone finally blew the 
whistle. Zigler was convicted 
and put in prison for a few days. 



The FCC came out of it fairly 
cfean r and a few of the favor 
recipients lost their tickets. Just 
a few, not 843. 

This is still grinding along 
through the courts on some 
level, so some day we may get 
the facts and be able to put all 
this into perspective. The people 
involved use the term "favors" 
rather than bribery. This seems 
more applicable in this case. I 
understand, too, that Zigler was 
quite upset by the pressures he 
was under to do these favors for 
Walker and I suspect that the 
favors for friends were more in 
retaliation for being forced to do 
what he considered wrong than 
as an enterprise in itself. All 
agree that Zigler was one of the 
nicest guys you could ever want 
to meet and that he was a vie- 
tim t not a criminal. 

Well, that's the story. I'm 
open for any further informa- 
tion, pro or con, as this de- 
velops. 

Some of the victims of this 
disaster are asking what the real 
difference is between someone 
who has been upgraded as a 
favor and the chap who has 
spent one day with Bash in his 
high-pressure memorization 
course which teaches you all of 
the test answers word for word. 
The end result is about the 
same: a higher grade license 
with no knowledge necessary. 

The real misery comes later 
when these people get on the air 
and can't let their fellow 
amateurs know that they don't 
know anything. That's when we 
start finding bad language and 
disruptive operating. 



I can't in any way defend what 
these chaps claim Walker got 
started... or Zigler continuing 
it. But Is it fair to crucify Zigler 
and let Bash keep going? 

SMITH CHARTS 

That's right, Dick Smith of 
Dick Smith Electronics in 
Australia is charting a trip 
around the world via helicopter 
And, yes, of course hell have a 
ham rig aboard, working 
20-40-80 meters as he flies. 

The trip, which is scheduled 
to start in August, 1982, will be a 
solo flight, with most hops in the 
200-400-mile ranges. It will start 
from Dallas and run up the east 
coast, across to Greenland, 
Iceland, the Faroes, down 
across Europe, down by Jordan 
and Egypt, across Saudi Arabia, 
Pakistan, up to New Delhi and 
Katmandu, down to Calcutta 
and Rangoon, and on down 
Australia to Sydney ... home. 
Then he'll head back up through 
eastern Asia across the Philip* 
pines, Japan, and across the 
northern Pacific via a couple of 
shipboard refueling stops to 
Adak in Alaska, down to An* 
chorage, Seattle, and to Dallas. 
He's expecting to end the trip in 
early 1983. . .the first solo 
helicopter flight around the 
world. 

Working him as he is flying 
will be fun, but I do hope he will 
plan sometime on the ground to 
get on the air and give us DX 
fanatics contacts with the 30 
countries he will be visiting 
along the way, 

As the trip draws near, we'll 







Australia's Dick Smtth VK2ZIP. 



73Magazine * April, 1982 45 



try to have a lot of Information 
on it for you. 

READER RESPONSES 
There are some questions 
about 73 on the reader response 
cards and every so often we get 
reports from the firm which pro- 
cesses these for us. I think you 
may find some of the news in- 
teresting. 

For instance, the latest 
replies, sampling about 5% of 
the readers, gives our readers an 
average income of $26,400 per 
year. Surprisingly, perhaps, 
31% are making over $30,000 
per year. Affluent group, really. 
That's up from 21 % a year ago. 

We asked how much you 
spent last year on ham gear and 
the average was $750, That's the 
average! When we apply that to 
the entire readership of 73, we 
find that you are spending near- 
ly $8,000,000 per month on ham 
equipment. Now that's just you 
73 readers, mind you, not the 
average ham. Indeed, there is a 
good reason to believe that our 
group represents about 70% of 
the total buying of ham gear 
That's higher that we expected. 



Manufacturers looking for 
new products which will interest 
hams should note that 13.1 % of 
the readers are actually active 
on RTTY today and 48.9% say 
they are not on RTTY, but are in* 
terested In getting on RTTY, 
That comes to around 60,000 73 
readers who have expressed an 
interest in RTTY, That's a gold 
mine if I ever saw one. 

With the increased circula- 
tion of recent months, and going 
by the reported readers per copy 
of the magazine, over 125,000 
hams are reading 73 every 
month. At $300 per copy, there 
is a lot of pass-along readership, 
but (he passalongees are most- 
ly active buying hams, not 
retired old-timers on pensions. 

Speaking of gold mines, 
80.5% of the readers want more 
articles on satellite television. I 
honestly expected to run into 
the usual resistance to new 
ideas with this and am pleased 
that everyone is hot to trot. You 
know, it is only a matter of time 
(and not much) before hams 
start getting much more into 
satellite communications. The 
time is just about here for that. 



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46 73Magai'me * April, 1982 



WALKMAN TALKMAN 

About three years ago. Sony 
came up with one of their usual 
brilliant ideas. . .the Walkman, 
This was a tiny audio cassette 
player which could be worn on 
the belt and used with a star* 
tiingty new type of lightweight 
stereo earphone system to make 
it possible to enjoy truly high- 
fidelity sound reproduction. 

Having been a manufacturer 
in the hi-fi business back in its 
early days and thus knowing 
what is involved tn such repro- 
duction, seldom heard with 
home systems which are afford- 
able. I was astounded when I 
first heard the Walkman player. 
It was great for walks and even 
for skiing. Of course, by the time 
I loaded up for skiing with the 
Walkman, some tapes, and an 
HT f my pockets were so full of 
expensive electronics that I 
didn't dare fall down. 

As tiny as the first Walkman 
from Sony was, a couple years 
later they surpassed themselves 
with an even smaller player, . , 
almost the size of the cassettes, 
only a bit thicker. This came out 
at about the time that the 
market was being flooded with 
knock-offs of the original 
Walkman made in Hong Kong 
and Taiwan, 

If you have never listened to 
the sound from a Walkman, you 
should take the opportunity the 
next time you see a friend with 
one- 
Okay, now on to the Talk- 
man . . . not by Sony, but be- 
ing made by an old Japanese 
friend of two-meter hams . * * 
Standard. I ran into an ad for 
this unit in the latest JSoVA 
catalog. Joe Sugarman. who, 
by the way, is a ham, has 
built up quite a reputation for 
state-of-the-art men's toys, so I 
wasn't surprised to find this new 
gadget appearing first in his 
catalog. 

The Talkman is a 50-MHz 
transceiver which you wear on 
your belt and which comes with 
a headphone-microphone set. It 
is designed for use by two peo- 
ple who want to be able to talk 
despite local noise or moderate 
separation. The transmitter is 
voice actuated, so you don't 
have to flick any switches. The 
sound is excellent quality, and 
there are a minimum of controls 
and adjustments so that anyone 
can put it on and use it. 

This is just what Sherry and I 



have been looking for to use in 
the Dodge van. It is so noisy in 
the van that normal conversa- 
tion is almost impossible, even 
when she is in the front seat. As 
soon as she heads for the seats 
in the middle or the lounge in the 
back, we've always had to 
scream to be heard The Talkman 
is perfect for this type of use. 

The Talkman Is also great for 
things like skiing lessons where 
you want to tafk to someone 
without having to yell a hundred 
yards or so. Or for talking with 
someone on top of the tower 
making adjustments while you 
are in the shack tuning up. The 
chap on the top of the tower 
does not need to hold an HT in 
one hand and the tower with 
the other We lose a lot of hams 
that way. 

Have you ever gnashed your 
teeth in frustration while waiting 
for your wife to come to an ar- 
ranged meeting spot in a shop- 
ping mall? With a portable type- 
writer I could have written an en- 
cyclopedia just in waiting time. 
Now, with the Talkman*.. Tm 
able to find out Just which of the 
toy stores has grabbed her and 
is holding her for ransom. 
Grandchildren, you know. 

They're a lot lighter and easier 
to use for short-range communi- 
cations than HTs, even if both 
people wanting to talk have tick* 
ets. No license required for 
these low-powered 50-MHz sets 
. , . and the antenna is built into 
the headphone wires, so you 
don't even poke out eyes. 

Sherry, who is fnto ballooning 
(just went down for her instruc- 
tor's ticket), will find the sets 
great for balioon-to-ground com- 
munications. It's very handy to 
let the ground crew know where 
you're planning to land. Sherry 
got hooked on balloons when 
we went down to Florida about 
five years ago for a two-meter 
balloon-to-balloon operation. 
Now she has her own. 

Tve often wondered why Stan- 
dard didn't keep up with the US 
two-meter market. They were 
one of the first and foremost in 
the field here, but then got 
behind when the Icom synthe- 
sized rigs came out. I still see 
some great looking Standard 
ham gear in the Japanese maga- 
zines, but no sign of US models 
being made. I'm still getting good 
use from my old Standard HTs. 



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73Magazine • April, 1982 49 



Vince Luciani K2V} 
PO Box 682 

Cologne N I 0821 J 



Detect Killer Tornadoes 

use an ordinary TV set 



Editor's Note: This article presents a controversial method for detecting tornadoes, 73 Magazine urges you, the reader, to consider ALL prac- 
tical methods of storm detection. We endorse no particular procedure but do encourage experimentation with the Weller Method and other 
promising ideas. We would like to hear from any group or Individual who has automated the Weller Method or used it in conjunction with an 
amateur radio network. For more information, see Tornado-Wise by Vines Luciani. Available from Cologne Press, PO Box 682 P Cologne NJ 
08213. Soft cover $3.95 plus $1.00 shipping and handling. 



Grab the cat Ma! Head 
for the cellar! The 

hloomin' TV set just went 
bright! 

How many readers could 
apply a Sherlock Holmes 
analysis to those words and 
come up with the scenario 
of a tornado watch? A 
watch in which a family has 
been using the "Weller 
Method" of detecting killer 
tornadoes using a home TV 
set — and a tunnel has just 
touched down! 

Holmes would have had 
a problem in deciding 
whether the tornado detec- 
tor was the cat or the TV 
set, although the modern 
detective would know it 
was the latter. Yet one day 
there may well be a study of 
the effect of tornado elec- 
trical radiation on cat's fur, 
for the subject, tornado 
electrical radiation, is quite 
controversial. 

If you are among the few 
who have heard of the Wel- 
ler Method, you may also 

50 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



be among those who re- 
member what it is and — of 
much more importance to 
you, Ma, and the cat— how 
to use it properly. 

Back in 1969, Newton 
Weller of West Des Moines, 
Iowa, had a garage packed 
with over 100 TV sets as he 
worked on his theory that 
the electrical radiation 
from killer tornadoes 
leaves a "signature" in the 
air for miles around, a sig- 
nature that could be detect- 
ed on an ordinary home TV 
set. 

Technically speaking, the 
electrical radiation from 
tornadoes peaks very near 
to TV Channel 2, and Weller 
discovered that if you prop- 
erly adjust your TV set's 
brightness control, the set 
could then respond to noth- 
ing but the tremendous 
electrical radiation from 
killer tornadoes, (A descrip- 
tion of the Weller Method is 
given with this article. It 
should be read cai 



before attempting to make 
use of the technique.) 

When Weller had <. hecked 
out every TV set marketed 
at the time (to make sure 
they would all respond 
properly as a tornado de- 
tector), he announced his 
discovery to the press via a 
Des Moines newspaper 
which printed the story a 
day before tornadoes 
struck the area Weller's 
timing couldn't have been 
better, though lowans 
claim that the probabilities 
of springtime tornado 
strikes are always uncom- 
fortably high. 

lowans had a chance to 
check out Weller promptly, 
and some did exactly that. 
Several later wrote to thank 
him for his contribution to 
their welfare, explaining 
that their TV sets had, in- 
deed, gone bright from tor- 
nado electrical radiation. 
This feature is the thrust of 
the Weller Method — that 
the electrical radiation 



from a killer tornado touch- 
ing down will overcome a 
darkened screen and cause 
it to go as bright as a 
fluorescent bulb. 

Closer to home, however, 
Weller commented, "My 
wife had all kinds of com- 
plaints about those TV sets 
in the garage, and if that 
strike hadn't happened 
when it did I might have 
given up on the whole 
idea/' 

Fortunately, he did not 
give up. Not that the weath- 
er service seems to care 
The National Weather Ser- 
vice (NWS) has never 
cozied up to the notion of a 
mere TV set "broadcasting" 
tornado warnings on its 
own. Despite reports of suc- 
cessful results everywhere, 
Weller remains largely un- 
recognized for his work ex- 
cept in Tornado Alley. 

NWS has conducted lim- 
ited testing on tornado elec- 
trical radiation. One test, 
for example, was on a series 



of strikes near the National 
Severe Storms Laboratory 
at Norman, Oklahoma, 
Those particular strikes ap- 
parently had reflected little 
electrical radiation — as 
happens with some — and 
based on those strikes, the 
report issued later disputed 
evidence of significant 
electrical radiation. 

Apparently, several of 
the nation's leading meteo- 
rologists disagreed with the 
report, as was evidenced in 
counterpoints (somewhat 
biting) expressed to the 
NWS There is, you see, 
quite a bit of controversy 
associated with tornadoes, 
and we really know very lit- 
tle about what causes them 
and what sustains them 
More than cat's fur has 
been rubbed the wrong way 
in the argument over 
whether killer tornadoes 
pack significant electrical 
radiation. 

While one side says there 
isn't any electrical radiation 
to tornadoes, the other side 
asks about those reports 
from people who have ac- 
tually looked inside a tor- 
nado funnel and have lived 
to tell about it Such reports 
have been of constant light- 
ning, brilliantly-luminous 
clouds, ''balls of fire/' and 
rotating bands of deep, 
blue lights similar to those 
of an arc welder, And, they 
add, what about the reports 
of scorched vegetation 
along a funnel's path [later 
seen quite clearly from the 
air), and of the strong smell 
of ozone (so characteristic 
of strong electrical dis- 
charges)? 

In a pig's eye, some have 
answered 

Pig's eye or cat's fur — 
the cat's got no one's 
tongue in the forever hang- 
ing controversy over torna- 
do electrical radiation. The 
subject is quite electrifying, 
anyway, yet one seldom 
will read about this feature 
unless one subscribes to 
certain stuffy journals and 
is willing to wade through 
some weighty statements. 
Few contemporary writers 



who are meteorologically 

founded will broach the 
subject. Yet, the public has 
a need to know. 

Readers should be able 
to choose for themselves 
Perhaps, in a moment of 
off-season nonchalance, 
one may be inclined to sti- 
fle a yawn over a discussion 
of tornadoes, but if you are 
in the proper geographical 
area (as evidenced by hav- 
ing middle-range ZIP 
codes), and if it is getting on 
toward springtime, you are 
well advised to properly 
learn the Weller Meth- 
od—its good points as well 
as bad. 

And speaking of the bad 
side, it is, indeed, a fact that 
not all tornadoes pack the 
extent of electrical radia- 
tion that makes the TV 
screen go bright, which is 
why certain sides contend 
you've got holes in the bot- 
tom of your salt shaker if 
you even think the Weller 
Method is reliable. 

"Of course it won't work 
with a weak tornado where 
the electrical energy is too 
low," says Weller. "But that 
weak tornado won't usually 
do much more than lift the 
roof off a hog shed — and 
even a straight windstorm 
will do that. The TV set 
does work on killer torna- 
does, and they're the ones 
that count!" 

Weller associate Paul J, 
Waite (Iowa State climatol- 
ogist) has this to offer; "Un- 
til we have the perfect warn- 
ing system, we should not 
neglect any opportunities 
to provide our populace 
with the means for self-pro- 
tection from the ravaging 
destruction of tornadoes/' 
Amen' 

How close are we, these 
days, to perfection with 
NWS tornado detectors? 
Not very. Mostly, the NWS 
relies upon outdated vac- 
uum-tube-type radars. Vac- 
uum tubes, if you remem- 
ber; were the gadgets that 
helped us advance our 
learning until we really 
took off with the discovery 
of transistors and solid- 



THE WELLER METHOD 

1. Tune your TV set to Channel 13, Adjust its brightness 
control to make the screen nearly (though not entirely) dark. 

2* Switch to Channel 2, Do not make any further ad- 
justments to the set. The screen should still be nearly dark, 

3. Sit and wait, ff the screen suddenly flashes on brightly 
and stays lit, move fast! That's the indication that a killer tor- 
nado funnel is down anywhere within 5 to 15 miles of 
you— perhaps, quite near. 

Notes 

• Be careful in Step 1 t not to set the brightness control too 
low, or the set may be so desensitized as to not respond even 
to the tornado's tremendous electrical radiation. <For 
simplified understanding, consider tornado electrical radia- 
tion as being equivalent to a radio transmitter broadcasting 
on Channel 2; the analogy is reasonably accurate.) 

• Some color sets cannol be made to respond to the 
brightness control adjustment. Be sure to check your set for 
this capability, 

• If your color set does not turn down with the brightness 
control, your best bet (always) would be to use a portable 
bkn.:K£!id white Wm'I foi the-Weiiei MsthQd Fhe added ad- 
vantage of being battery operated makes it useful when 
power lines inevitably go down in a tornado strike. 

• If you are on a cable TV system, disconnect the cable from 
in back of the set and connect the built-in antenna, 

• A local station on your Channel 2 may, during a tornado 
warning, cause the darkened screen to switch back and forth 
a few times from being brightly lit by the tornado to the local 
TV program As the tornado approaches, its tremendous 
radiation will take over and cause the screen to stay bright. 

• Not alt tornadoes pack intense efectncai radiation. Con- 
tinue, therefore, to monitor news broadcasts either on a sec- 
ond TV set or by radio. 

• Practice the Weller Method when lightning fills the air. 
Note how lightning affects your darkened screen, and 
become familiar with how dark to make the set. You will ihen 
be more sure of yourself when the time comes that your 
screen stays brightly lit, 

• Be prepared ahead of time— you and your family — on what 
to do if the screen goes bright. Know your plan well enough to 
avoid panic reaction, Know what safety measures to take, 
and know them well in advance. 



state circuitry. NWS defi- 
nitely needs to replace 
those old radars. 

Exactly, says the NWS, 
and they have proposed a 
$250 million network of 
modern Doppler-type ra- 
dars, with a few of which 
they are currently experi- 
menting (Doppler, by the 
way, is a physical principle 
which involves motion de- 
tection; whatever else a tor- 
nado's funnel can be char- 
acterized as, it is certainly a 
dynamic picture of nature 
in motion!} But a quarter- 
bil lion-dollar outlay in to- 
day's slash-everything 
economy? Not very likely, 

Even so, Dopplers actual- 
ly add very little improve- 
ment in the accuracy of tor- 



nado detection. They offer, 
instead, a significant in- 
crease in lead time once 
they do spot a for-real tor- 
nado. That is important- 
Lead time, as they like to 
say in Tornado Alley, car- 
ries a mite more concern in 
a tornado watch than does 
lead time on a rising covey 
of quail. Quite a mite more. 
It shouldn't surprise read- 
ers, then, to learn that the 
most effective tornado de- 
tector anywhere is the 
trained human eye. Which 
is exactly the talent NWS 
makes good use of via con- 
cerned citizens in an organi- 
zation called "Skywarn/' 
These are the civilian spot- 
ters throughout the country 
who offer their services 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 51 









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(often, quite courageously) 
for your benefit and mine. 

People from all walks of 
life have taken up the 
public service banner in 
sLipport of Skywarn, though 
perhaps no group has done 
so more completely, more 
effectively, than that spe- 
cial class of citizens known 
to us as amateur (ham) 
radio operators. 

In Texas, for example, 
nearly 2.000 ham radio op- 
erators are on call to assist 
NWS when storm alerts are 
sounded. Most members 
take annual courses in tor 
nddo spotting, not only to 
improve their effectiveness 
but also to learn when to 
zig rather than zag as they 
are driving out there in the 
thick of things, spotting a 
downed twister as it snakes 
its deadly way across the 
plains. 

Lone Star members of 
the hobby proved their 
worth at Wichita Falls, 
Texas, in 1979, when a 



series of killer tornadoes 
caused a half billion dollars 
damage. NWS credits the 
early-warning communica- 
tions networks of radio 
amateurs with having saved 
1,000 to 2,000 lives there. 
Such is the dedicated pub- 
lic-service nature of a hob- 
by which includes ditch dig- 
gers, executives, and even a 
US senator! 

Through it all and con- 
tinuing to survive the test of 
time (which is an admirable 
bottom-line characteristic 
to any theory) is the con- 
tinuing undercurrent of sup- 
port for the Welter Method. 
This is from an informed 
public, those who like the 
idea of having a detector 
for killer tornadoes right 
there in the house. 

Not that the Weller 
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nel that comes puffing and 
blowing down the field, but 
when the TV set does go 
bright . . "Crab the cat Ma! 
Head for the cellar!"M 



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52 73 Magazine * April. 1982 



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TVRO Dish Selection Tactics 

Satellite Central, part V 



Picking the right antenna 
for your TVRO can be 
dangerous! Too many peo- 
ple are ready to tell you 
that theirs is the best. Who 
can be trusted? 

For example, we know 
the press release blitz tout- 
ing the 3-foot dish for spar- 



klie-f ree pictures was just a 
wild fantasy All the hoopla 
was directed at the 12-CHz 

direct broadcast satellite 
(DBS), but somehow devel- 
oped into identical claims 
for 4 GHz! The mere differ- 
ence in frequency suggests 
that this isn't possible at 4 
GHz So you must arm 




yourself against those that 
would have you believe 
that the TVRO antenna de* 
partment runs on magic! 

At the moment, the big- 
gest selling point is gain. 
But the three things you 
really should be looking for 
in a dish are size, accuracy, 
and feed match. Despite 
what sales claims may say, 
they all carry about equal 
weight! 

Formula Blasts Wild Claims 

Here's an easy way to rip 
away the veil of mystery 
concerning dish antenna 
gain versus size. Simply use 
this formula the next time 
you see a demonstration or 
see an ad touting high an- 
tenna gain, lust plug in the 
numbers to find the true 
gain. 

Cain in dB = 

lOiogtFXEXD'), 
where F is the frequency in 
GHz (3-7), E is the efficiency 

in percent and D is the di- 
ameter in meters. You can 



convert feet to meters by 
simply dividing feet by 328. 

The trick to using the for- 
mula is knowing the effi- 
ciency of the antenna, 
While a quality dish may 
have 55 to 60 percent effi- 
ciency, the typical value for 
home-brew may only be 50 
percent owing to poor sur- 
face integrity and feed de- 
sign, as we shall soon see. 

As a practical matter, 
you could stuff the formula 
into a programmable cal- 
culator and take it with you 
when you go dish shopping, 
Or you can type the dish 
gain program seen in Fig. 1 
into a pocket computer 
such as the Sharp or TRS-80, 
It's only a few lines of code 
and may very well be worth 
the effort, especially when 
a salesman touts his 10-foot 
dish as having a whopping 
43 dB gain! You can simply 
dig into your pocket and 
produce a better approx- 
imation of the true gain. 

I saw an ad in another 



The antenna wizard and his sacred tools of alchemy, 

54 73 Magazine • Apr! J, 1982 



10 PAUSE "PARABOLIC DISH GAIN" : BEEP 1 

20 INPUT "DIAMETER (FEET)"; D 

30 INPUT "EFFICIENCY % (55)"; E 

40 INPUT "FREQUENCY GHZ (3.7)"; F 

50 D=D/3.2808 :G = 10*(LOG<E*(F*F)*(D'D))) 

60 PRINT "GAIN = "; G 

70 GOTO 10 

Fig. 1. Calculate true dish antenna gain with this simple pro- 
gram for the Sharp or TRS-80 pocket computer. The prch 
gram will run on almost any other computer supporting 
BASIC. What self-respecting computer doesn't nowadays? 
Only line 10 may need adjustment. The strange values in 
parentheses in lines 30 and 40 are suggested inputs. 





Fig. 2. Doing it with mirrors may tell you the whole story 
about dish accuracy, Use a small mirror and point the dish 
at the sun. The reflected rays should bounce into the feed- 
horn. 





Fig. 3. A long pole or length of wall molding will reach any- 
where on a dish and is safer. Tape the mirror to the pole like 
a hinge so it rests flat on the dish. Very few inexpensive dish- 
es will pass this test When you find one that does, buy it! 



magazine recently that in- 
deed claimed 43-dB gain 
from a 10-foot dish, This 
was beyond belief! In fact, I 
immediately tried to buy 
one because at 4 GHz, a 
10-foot dish would have 
100% efficiency and I 
wanted to be the first to 
own this eighth wonder of 
the world! But an excited 
call to their chief engineer 
revealed that he not only 
assumed 100% efficiency, 
but used a feedhorn known 
to achieve just 55% effi- 
ciency at best for this dish 
size and depth. He even did 
all his calculations at the 
high end of the band, which 
he was " told to do by 
the sales manager/' 

This is another trick you 
might want to watch out 
for, If gain is computed on- 
ly at the high end of the 
band [42 GHz), you can 
make the numbers look 



nearly 1 dB hotter. Try it 
yourself. It's like adding 
nearly 2 feet to the dish 
diameter! This clever ruse 
can give the buyer or home 
builder a mistaken impres- 
sion of the gain being the 
same at the low end of the 
band (3.7 GHz), which it 
isn't! After all we do want 
to receive the entire band, 
don't we? You may think 
this an arbitrary point, 
which indeed it might be 
until you remember that 
just one single decibel in an 
FM system like this one can 
make the difference be- 
tween a clear picture and a 
snowstorm. Many manufac- 
turers today are calculating 
gain this way and you 
should know about it, 
Caveat emptor! 

It's Not How Small 
You Make It 

While it's possible to just 



get by threshold with only 
an 8-foot dish using a very 
low noise amplifier on a hot 
footprint, you will be better 
off using a 12-foot or larger 
dish for really sparklie-free 
pictures almost anywhere 
else. Even larger dishes may 
be necessary as you move 
off the footprint. Perhaps 
you recall from our past dis- 
cussions that the LNA and 
dish operate on a kind of 
teeter- totter where a large 
dish can allow a cheap LNA 
to be used. Likewise, similar 
results are possible using a 
smaller dish and a higher 
grade LNA. 

How small can you go? 
Eight feet is about the low 
end for wideband FM video 
due to the fact that the 
beamwidth and side-lobe 
response of smaller dishes 
let more ambient terrestrial 
noise reach the feed. Side- 
lobe response is very impor- 



tant with a TVRO antenna 
because the signal is about 
30 dB or more below the 
noise. 

It appears there's more 
to a TVRO antenna than 
just collecting a signal. It 
must also be a kind of rejec- 
tor as well, a shield to the 
barrage of interference in 
the vicinity. It might be 
easier if the noise were 
man-made, but the music of 
the spheres is an annoying 
din, especially from our 
own particular sphere, terra 
firma t which demands we 
use ideas bordering on 
geometric optics to build 
workable antennas As bet- 
ter and smaller antennas 
are designed, lower noise 
amplifiers will take up the 
slack in lost gain due to im- 
proved antenna shielding 
properties. But more work 
on this problem is needed. 
The horn/reflector is a very 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 55 







A 



s 



\ 






/ 



\ 



X 



/ 



IDEAL FEED 



TYPICAL FEED 



Fig. 4, Typical feedhorns fall off in sensitivity near the edge 
of the dish. Circular models may capture as much as 1 dB 
more signal, 1 dB is nothing to sneer at Its like switchings 
120-degree LNA for a more expensive 80-degree model! 



good solution despite the 
plain fact that its large size 

makes it impractical at the 
moment. 

How To Check 
Dish Accuracy 

A really good dish will 
follow a parabolic curve to 
within plus or minus 1/1 6th 
of an inch. Achieving this 
accuracy is no easy feat 
Some manufacturers will 
rightly say that such accu- 
racy won't improve the gain, 
which is true to some ex- 
tent. But the argument falls 
down flatter than a bad dish 
when side lobes are con- 
sidered. Side-lobe response 
is directly related to surface 
accuracy. 

Why are side lobes im- 
portant? Remember, we are 
trying to hear a soft conver- 
sation in a room full of 
shouting people. The ambi- 
ent noise floor at the anten- 
na site may be - 1 30 dBW, 
but the signal we want is a 
lowly -160 dBW or 
worse. Only a narrow beam- 
width dish with very low 
side lobes will receive it 
while rejecting the noise. 

Now in the past the only 
way to test a dish was to put 
it on a test range, feed it sig- 
nals from a known micro- 
wave source, and plot a re- 
ception pattern. Then a few 
clever engineers worked 
out a method of antenna 
pattern plotting using noise 
from the sun. It works rath- 
er well but requires some 
test gear. A less accurate 
but easy way is to build a 
mating template that fol- 

56 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



lows the ideal dish curve, 
place it in the dish, and 
hope it fits like a glove. 

Doing It With Mirrors 

But hauling a large tem- 
plate to a dealer or satellite 
show is not too practical, 
There must be a better way. 
And P of course, there al- 
ways is, but long after 
you've completed the job, 
according to Murphy's taw. 
Here's an easy trick I use to 
spot-check a dish. It's a real 
trial by fire. Simply place a 
small mirror anywhere on 
the reflector surface as 
seen in Fig. 2 Then point 
the dish at the sun and look 
where the reflected rays go. 
They should bounce right 
into the feedhorn! 

If you imagine, for a mo- 
ment, the sun as just 
another satellite, then the 
sun's rays should always hit 
the feed or else that partic- 
ular portion of the dish isn't 
accurate. Try several spots 
on the dish. If the sun's rays 
don't make it, neither will 
microwaves! Right? 

There are a few caveats 
to doing this test. First use 
a small mirror. Less than 3 
inches (one wavelength) is 
necessary. A larger mirror 
will only make things look 
worse. Second, crawling on 
a mounted dish isn't too 
safe no matter what lat- 
itude you're at. So the best 
method is to tape the mirror 
to a long pole or piece of 
wall molding as seen in Fig. 
3 and move it around the 
surface. Third, wear dark 
glasses. You'll be looking 



almost directly at the sun. 
And fourth, don't be afraid 
of frying the LNA with this 
test. A flat mirror doesn't 
magnify So a moment's 
reflection (despite the pun) 
will remind you that you 
are not increasing the LNA 
temperature more than you 
would if you simply pointed 
the bare LNA at the sun! 

Feeds Are the Culprits 

Perhaps you recall from 
last month's discussion that 
feeds limit antenna effi- 
ciency to the 50% to 60% 
range because their sen- 
sitivity pattern cannot ade- 
quately cover a dish. See 
Fig. 4. The ideal feed pat- 
tern would be flat as a pan- 
cake across the top and 
drop to zero at the sides, 
But that's not all. The manu- 
facturer of this fabled horn 
would need several models, 
one for each size dish, 
because any overshoot by 
the horn would add a con- 
siderable amount of ter- 
restrial noise to the signal 
and breed the dreaded 
"sparklies" faster than rab 
bits. 

Back now to the real 
world. A lot of work was 
done on feedhorns in the 
'60s, mostly by radio astron- 
omers. Their ideal feed 
overshoot occurs when the 
edges of the dish are illumi- 
nated at a level which is 
— 15 to — 20 dB down from 
the center. As a practical 
matter, TVRO designers use 
the -10-dB point on the 
curve At the moment, sev- 
eral manufacturers offer 
nearly identical feeds that 
cover a narrow range of 
dish sizes and F/D ratios. 
Depending on dish size, a 
typical horn will operate 
over an F/D range of ,3 to .5 
with moderate efficiency. 
F/D is simply dish focal 
length divided by the diam- 
eter. Some companies will 
design a feedhorn for your 
specific dish. All that varies 
is the flare angle of the 
horn, which directly affects 
the angle of the illumina- 
tion pattern* 



Watch For Sleight Of Hand 

If you see a demonstra- 
tion where a small dish is 
used and the pictures look 
fine t stop and ask yourself if 
the salesman is showing 
you only the best transpon- 
ders. Test your suspicions 
by asking if you can do the 
tuning. Then try all the 
transponders, RCA birds 
(Satcom) have 24 transpon- 
ders, while Western Union 
birds (Westar) have only 1 2, 
Not all transponders lay the 
same footprint levels in a 
given area, so you must 
test In many cases, you 
may find the test being con- 
ducted on a bird which may 
have a hot footprint in your 
area, Ask to see what all the 
transponders look like on 
other birds. It may be wise 
to have a log of what is 
available. A complete list 
of program sources and 
times on alt the satellites is 
available from Satellite TV 
Week, PO Box 308, Fort una 
CA 95540, (707>725-2476. 
Cost is $48/year or $65/year, 
first class. 

You may discover when 
you have free reins on the 
tuning knob that many 
transponders are buried in 
the sparklies, Throw the 
salesman off guard by ask- 
ing why! The answers you 
get may cause you to recon- 
sider a purchase. Be pre- 
pared for the interference 
argument. It may be valid. 
Quite often you may dis- 
cover that satellite TV in 
your area will be plagued 
with interference from Ma 
BelL At this point, you must 
be on special guard be- 
cause location of the dish 
becomes very important. 
While your house can make 
a dandy shield to a direct 
signal, you must also nar- 
row your search to a very 
high integrity dish so the 
side-lobe levels are at their 
lowest This problem may 
cause you to re-think your 
location, A large rf fence is 
an eyesore even to the most 
understanding wife. 

Of course you can stifle 
the interference to some 



degree with notch filters in 
the receiver i-f. As a rule, 
Ma Bell carriers are located 
plus and minus 10 MHz 
from the center of a typical 
transponder. If you install 
notch filters at 60 and 80 
MHz in a typical 70-MHz i-f 
amplifier, the interference 
will be drastically reduced 
and may turn an otherwise 
unwatchable picture into 
something that can be 
viewed, though not fully ap- 
preciated as studio quality, 
mainly because notch fil- 
ters remove some of the 
signal you want to receive! 

Magic Without Mirrors 

Antennas for TVROs are 
no more different than for 
any other service when it 
comes to the rock-solid 
basics. But you must be on 
the lookout for magical 
claims because this field is 
new to the entrepreneur 
types who sell only the siz- 
zle. There is a tendency 
among many (including my- 



self) to buy a product 
because the advertising is 
slick or the numbers in the 
ad fit your calculations and 
pocketbook 

The problem is "new- 
ness" If you see everyone 
getting fantastic pictures 
with an Acme Whizbang 
Launcher, then it must be 
pretty good. But very few 
people even know what a 
TVRO is, let alone a Whiz- 
bang whatever. So it's up to 
you to break the new 
ground, to make the mis- 
takes. . .and claim the vic- 
tories. Just be careful and 
remember that a wise man 
always looks before he 
leaps. 

The time is right for you 
to join in the fun of receiv- 
ing TV from space. If you 
have a question regarding 
the topics we cover here, 
feel free to drop me a line 
(letters only, no calls 
please), Sorry, I can only 
answer mail that is accom- 
panied by an SASE.B 




Quantity discount price structures available upon 
request for dealers. Dealerships, both domestic 
and foreign available in many areas. For further 
information, please contact John Michaels, Sales 
Manager Telephone hours: Monday thru Thurs- 
day, 10-4. 



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73 Magazine * April, 1982 57 



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58 73 Magazine ■ April, 1962 



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73 Magazine * April, 1982 59 



Taylor Howard: 
TVRO Trailblazer 



Tim Daniel N8RK 
73 Magazine Staff 



Taylor Howard W6HD 
I has been called many 

different names He didn't 



mind when the Australian 
government nicknamed him 
the "Crazy Professor/' but 
when opponents of the 
home-TVRO industry la- 
beled Howard as a 'pirate/' 
he got mad. "There are pi- 
rates out there." Tay How- 
ard freely admits, "but why 







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should I be prohibited from 
receiving signals that I can't 
get any other way?" 

For Dr. Taylor Howard, 
the future of satellite TV is 
a very serious business 
Ever since he built the 
world's first private Earth 
station, VV6HD has been in 
the forefront of the battle 
to legitimize the infant 
home-satellite-TV industry 
The debate centers on the 
availability of services. 
Howard just wants access 
to the same entertainment 
and information that cable 
TV customers can get, 

"I don't want to be a sec- 
ond-class citizen just be- 
cause I don't live in a condo 
in New York" is his argu- 
ment Without missing a 
beat he goes on to acknowl- 
edge the need for Earth- 
station owners to pay a fair 
price for these services. 

Tay Howard brings a 
unique viewpoint to the up- 
start TVRO field. His heart 
really lies in the workshop 
or laboratory, not in a con- 
gressional hearing room or 
courthouse Howard, along 
\Mth another ham. Robert 
Coleman, built the first sat- 
ellite receivers that the av- 
erage hobbyist could dupli- 
cate. The original Coleman- 
Howard design is at the root 
of most of the commercial 
receivers sold today. Other 
W6HD innovations include 



specialized TVRO test gear 
and a low-cost method of 
changing the polarity of 
a feed. 

Today, Dr Howard de- 
votes most of his time to 
serving the TVRO industry 
as a spokesman and con- 
sultant, but he remains on 
the faculty at Stanford Uni- 
versity where he contrib- 
utes to NASA's deep-space 
exploration program. A ma- 
jor chunk of his time has 
been spent as member and 
the first President of SPACE 
(Society for Private and 
Commercial Earth Termi- 
nals), which represents t! 
terminal owners and manu- 
facturers 

The nickname "Crazy 
Professor" was given to 
W6HD when he proposed a 
satellite reception scheme 
for Australia's outback 
Government officials said it 
couldn't be done — that the 
signals just weren't strong 
enough. Howard chose to 
ignore the doomsayers. 
After building a big sphere 
cal antenna, he attached a 
receiver and then sat back 
to watch TV. The aborig- 
ines, the government, and 
even some of Howard's 
backers were amazed 
There wasn't any magic in- 
volved; Howard knew that 
the theory permitted suc- 
cess, but only if someone 
took the time to try. 



60 73Magazine * April, 1982 



In his quiet, yet confi- 
dent manner, Taylor How- 
ard offered the following 
thoughts; 

• 12-GHz Direct Broadcast 
Satellites: Aren't the 4-CHz 

satellites already direct 
broadcast? Technically, 12 
GHz is not that far away. 
The problems are legal. 
Even the Europeans are 
having trouble. There is no 
way to limit the pattern of a 
satellite's signal to a coun- 
try's geographical borders. 
The threat of cultural im- 
perialism must be solved 
before the world is ready. 

• Impact of Video: Satel- 
lite TV can have a positive 
effect on people's lives. It 
brings them into the main- 
stream of life regardless of 
where they live. Modern 
kids are pretty good about 
television. They know the 
difference between good 
and bad. 

• Microwave Technology: 
Signal processing has been 
the downfall of the micro- 



wave industry We need to 
learn how to integrate the 
entire system into one 
package. This would help 
reduce the expense for up- 
linking to satellites. 

• Opportunities: Hams are a 
natural for getting involved 
in the satellite-TV field. We 
are totally short of compe- 
tent people There could be 
employment for every ham 
in the country. You need 
both digital and rf knowl- 
edge and the ability to com- 
bine the two. An under- 
standing of transmission- 
line theory is important. 

• Appliance Operators: 
There are lots of hams who 
are yakkers; you might say 
that they have a PhD in CB 

But that is okay; we need 
people like that, I've always 
been technically inclined 
and will protect the individ- 
ual experimenter. 

You won't find Tay 
Howard with a patch over 
his eye, stalking the deck of 
a galleon. Look for him in 
the Australian wilderness, a 










Taylor Howard W6HD. 



college laboratory, or in his 
dish-filled backyard. He 
won't be searching for buried 
treasure Instead, he may 
be gazing skyward. Taylor 



Howard is a pioneer, not a 
pirate, and for him, satellite 
television is going to be 
"big, very big r we haven't 
seen anything yet!"B 



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73 Magazine * April, 1982 61 



TVRO Q & A 

advice from WB0POP — part II 



Ken Rae W&QPOP 
737 South Ctarkson 
Denver CO &0209 



I found a great deal for a 
surplus antenna. The only 
problem is that it's bent Can 
it be straightened? 

Dents in a metal dish 
usually can be pushed out 
with a piece of wood. If the 
dish is warped from rim to 
rim, the antenna is probably 




Fig. 1, A wooden template 
can be used to check the ac- 
curacy of an antenna 
surface. 

62 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



hopeless unless you remold 
the entire surface If the 
cure is not simple, then 
start looking for another 
antenna. 

How can / measure the ac- 
curacy of a dish? 

The first step is to find 
the focal point and diam- 
eter. Next, using the appro- 
priate equation, draw an ac- 
curate representation of 
the parabolic curve on a 
large piece of paper. This 




Fig. 2. Two pieces of string 
stretched at right angles 
should just touch the mid- 
dle if the rim of the dish 
is true. 



paper model can be used to 
make a wooden template 
that can be lined up against 
the dish to check its accu- 
racy — see Fig. 1. (The most 
useful type of template has 
two of these "half moons/' 
mounted at right angles.) 
You can check the rim by 
laying the dish face down, 
on a flat surface like a level 
concrete floor. A quick 
field test can be made by 
stretching two strings 
across the dish at right 
angles (see Fig. 2). A de- 
flection or gap between the 
two strings indicates that 
part of the rim is bent or 
warped. If the rim is true, 
the two strings should just 
touch in the middle, 

A friend of mine is thinking 
about buying an oval- 
shaped dish. The price is 
right, but will it work? 

Unfortunately, an oval- 
shaped antenna would be 
next to useless, no matter 
what the price. The bore 
sight of an oval dish is 



not circular, so you will 
receive a mixture of hor- 
izontally- and vertically- 
polarized signals. This is 
unacceptable for conven- 
tional TVRO work. 

What are my chances of 
finding an appropriate 
surplus dish? 

You might be better off 
searching for a bikini-clad 
beachcomber in Denver 
during the dead of winter. 
The tremendous interest in 
TVRO has made surplus an- 
tennas a scarce commod- 
ity. There are a few hiding in 
corners of junk yards wait- 
ing to be scrapped. Others 
are being retired from com- 
mercial service. In any case, 
youll have to do a lot of 
looking and have the right 
contacts, 

/ can't find a surplus anten- 
na, nor can I afford to buy a 
new dish. What is my next 
option ? 

You can build your own 
antenna* The spherical de- 



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73 Magazine • April, 1982 63 



sign is probably a little bit 
cheaper and easier to dupli- 
cate than a parabolic, but it 
is also less versatile, ff you 
are good at scrounging ma- 
terials, you can build either 
a parabolic or spherical 
antenna for $100 to $400. 
However, don't underesti 
mate the amount of work 
involved. 

What about building a 
stressed dish? 

Amateurs have been ex- 
perimenting with this type 
of parabolic antenna tor 
many years. Unfortunately, 
most stressed-type designs 
are not intended for contin- 
uous exposure to the ele- 
ments For best results, a 
stressed antenna must be 
guyed in position, eliminat- 
ing the ability to change 
satellites easily. 

Is there a simple way to spot 
potential obstructions be- 
tween my antenna and the 
satellites? 

Go to your tentative site 
and look due south. Raise 
your arm to about 45 de- 
grees from horizontal. 
Sweep your arm across the 
sky, dropping it down as 
you move to the east or 
west. If you live in the cen- 
tral United States, this will 
give you a rough idea of the 
satellites' location If there 
are trees, buildings, or other 
obstructions that look risky, 
take the time to run a seri- 
ous check on the site. 

What is the maximum dis- 
tance I can have between 
my TV set and the satellite 
antenna? 

If you are using a single- 
conversion receiver where 
the downconverter is locat- 
ed at the antenna and a 
70-MHz signal is sent to the 
house, there can be as 
much as a 100-foot run of 
RG-8/U coaxial cable (or 
perhaps a good grade of 
RG-58) without losing a nch 
ticeable amount of the sig- 
nal due to cable loss. If 
your system requires that 
you relay a 4-GHz signal, it 

64 73 Magazine • Apr! U 982 



will be necessary to run 
hardline or heliax cable, 
which costs as much as $4 
per foot, or about ten times 
the cost of RC-8/U. If you 
do use a good grade of 
hardline, it can usually be 
80 to 100 feet long before 
the losses catch up and de- 
grade the picture. Line am- 
plifiers can be added to in- 
crease this distance, but the 
cost may be prohibitive. 

My neighbor is considering 
installing her own TVRO, 
Could that interfere with mv 
system? 

Just as hams living next 
to each other sometimes 
have interference prob- 
lems, so can adjacent 
TVRO systems. The difficul- 
ty usually stems from local 
oscillator (LO) leakage. This 
unit typically has 10 milli- 
watts of output, and if it is 
not well shielded, a signal 
will be radiated If your 
neighbor wants to receive a 
signal on the same frequen- 
cy that your LO is operating 
on, there could be a prob- 
lem Dual-conversion re- 
ceivers or welt-shielded sin- 
gle-conversion designs go a 
long way towards reducing 
the interference. 

What is an Az-El mount? 

This type of mount al- 
lows you to move a dish 
vertically [El] and horizon- 
tally (Az) In my opinion, 
this is the hard way to do 
things unless you are chas- 
ing satellites that move, like 
Russia's Molniya birds If 
you'll be watching only the 
geosynchronous satellites, 
a polar mount is probably 
more useful. 

QK, what's a polar mount? 
The polar mount allows 
you to rotate the dish from 
east to west or vice versa 
and keep the axis of the 
dish in line with the axis of 
the Earth You can align the 
axis for a polar mount by 
using the North Star as a 
guide. When you sweep 
your dish across the sky, it 
will not be necessary to 



make any significant ad- 
justments in the elevation if 
you have a polar mount 

What is a "free" mount? 

There is no strict defini- 
tion for a tree mount All 
you do is prop your dish 
against a handy tree, the 
side of a building, or any- 
thing else that is conveni- 
ent. This kind of mount is 
useful if you are in too 
much of a hurry to build a 
polar or Az-El mount 

How do I center the feed- 
horn on a dish? 

To place the feedhorn at 
the focal point requires 
measurement from the cen- 
ter of the feedhorn's mouth 
to the edge of the dish. This 
distance should be the 
same to all points on the 
edge. 

When l was positioning rny 
feedhorn, I found a better 
signal when the horn was 
slightly off center Why? 

If your signal improves 
when the horn is not cen- 
tered, there may be two cul- 
prits; The dish is not 
pointed directly at the 
chosen satellite or the an- 
tenna's surface is warped, 
causing the actual focal 
point to differ from the 
theoretical focus, A distort- 
ed dish may have one or 
more false "hot" spots. On 
a well-built dish that is 
pointed directly at the 
satellite, your best signal 
will be found when the 
feedhorn's mouth is at the 
calculated focal point. 

I have a good dish and I 
know it is pointed right; I 
still get two hot spots, one at 
the edge of the feedhorn 
mouth, the other just inside 
the horn. What gives? 

When you move the horn 
back and forth through the 
focal point, there will be 
two distinct "hot" spots. 
The wave pattern has an 
hourglass shape since the 
impedance seen by the ar- 
riving signal changes ac- 
cording to the distance. The 



hot spot that is closest to 
the dish is the most effi- 
cient because it offers a 
narrow bore sight. This 
means that the focal point 
will lie about Vi to Vi inch 
inside the horn. 

When placing the horn, 
which fs more critical, mov- 
ing the mouth from side to 
side or moving it towards 
and away from the dish? 

A two-inch shift to one 
side can result in as much 
as a 3-dB drop in signal 
level while a two-inch 
movement in or out will re- 
sult in a 1-1.5-dB loss Con- 
centrate on lining up the 
side-to-side dimension. 

As / sweep my dish across 
the sky, there is a slight '7m- 
age" Signal about four de- 
grees on either side of the 
bore sight position for a par- 
ticular satellite. What is 
this? 

I discovered the same 
thing when I was installing a 
new antenna First I thought 
it was a new satellite After 
disproving that theory, I 
spent many hours carefully 
refocusing my antenna Fi- 
nally, after a lot of reading, 
I discovered that any para- 
bolic antenna that is not 
perfect will exhibit side 
lobes These will allow you 
to receive signals that are 
much weaker than those 
you find with the major 
lobe pointed at the satel- 
lite. The better the dish, the 
less prominent the side 
lobes. 

Why do I receive vertical 
transponders better than 
horizontal transponders on 
the same satellite? 

On Satcom F1, the verti- 
cal transponders were 
slightly stronger than the 
horizontal ones, but the 
one-half-dB difference was 
not enough for most hobby- 
ists to notice. If you have a 
noticeable difference be- 
tween the two polarities, it 
may be the result of inac- 
curacies in the antenna's 
surf ace J 



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* Grand Banquet 



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April 23, 24, 25, 1 982 

Hara Arena and Exhibition Center — Dayton, Ohio 

Meet your amateur radio friends from all over the world at the internationally famous Dayton HAMVENTION 
Seating will be limited for Grand Banquet and Entertainment on Saturday evening so please make reserva- 
tions early. Banquet speaker is Roy Nea!, K6DUE, NBC News. 

If you have resistered within the last 3 years you will receive a brochure in late February, If not write Box 
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Nominations are requested for Radio Amateur of the Year and Special Achievement Awards. Nomination 
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For special motel rates and reservations write to Hamvention Housing, 1406 Third National Bldg., 
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Make checks payable to Dayton HAMVENTION, Box 333, Dayton, OH 45405. 
Bring your family and enjoy a great weekend in Dayton* 
Sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association, Inc. 



See U$i of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 65 




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6G 73 Magazine • AprilJ982 




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73 Magazine • April, 1982 67 



Timothy Edwards 

<lo Ambti International 

200 North Service Road 

Brentwood, fssex CM 14 -JSC 

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VHF Converter 

easy to build, yet state of the art 



Editor's Note: This state-of-the-art VHF converter design is reprinted from the British publication Radio and Electronics World. A complete 
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Despite the plethora of 
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148 MHz) amateur commu- 
nication band, most radio 
enthusiasts like to try to 



salve their consciences as 
participants in the once ex- 
clusively "practical" art of 




Photo A. The finished unit with cable, 
68 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



amateur radio by making at 
least one or two items of 
equipment that can justifi- 
ably be described as home 
grown " 

Most of the commercial 
transceivers for the VHF 
bands are primarily FM sys- 
tems for simply "nattering/' 
«ind some of the hobby's 
traditionalists might sug- 
gest that the use of 2m 
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principles behind CB radio 
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ject 

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3-dB bandwidth 




144*146 MHz 


l-f output 




28-30 MHz 


1-dB compression 




+ 5-dB output 


Saturated output 




+ 7dBm 


Supply voitage 




8-16 V 


Supply current 




15 mA nominal 


irvout impedance 




50 Ohms 


Size 




70 x 60 x 20 mm 



make a thoroughly profes- 
sional converter for 144-1 46 
MHz, with an i-f output to 
be tuned on the 28-30-MHz 
section of the HF receiver. 
The radio enthusiast may 
thus fulfill the repressed 
constructional instinct, as 
well as be able to have a se- 
rious look at the CW and 
SSB aspects of the 2-meter 
band before launching in- 
to a few hundred dol- 
lars worth of oriental 
temptation. 

The converter is basically 
a linear device within the 
expected range of input 
signal levels, so any mode 
(AM, FM and SSB) can be 
converted to the required 
HF output Some HF receiv- 
ers are available with 
NBFM demodulators, but 
to do the job properly, the 
correct bandwidth i-f filter 
needs to be used with a pur- 
pose-made NBFM if sys- 
tem In the absence of this 
facility, slope detection of 
NBFM is better than noth- 
ing. (Slope detection relies 
on the i-f filter passband 
edge to translate the fre- 
quency modulation infor- 
mation into an amplitude 
variation for detection as 
simple AM) 

Judging by the numbers 
of "nearly new" SSB trans- 
ceivers advertised for sale, 
it is no doubt better to in- 
vestigate your long-term in- 
terest in this aspect of com- 
munication without first 
contributing to the wrong 
side of the balance of 
payments. This converter 
provides reception of re- 
peaters, NBFM simplex, and 
demanding long-range 
communications using CW 
or SSB 



The 2-Meter Converter 

This converter was origi- 
nally designed to comple- 
ment the RX80 receiver 
described in the British 
magazine Radio Communi- 
cation, although it will obvi- 
ously operate with such 
receivers as the FRG-7 r 
R10Q0, DX16G, etc. It has 
been designed with the lat- 
est state-of-the-art compo- 
nents, notably the NEC 
3SK88 MOSFET which has 
been chosen for its repeat- 
ably low noise figure and 
low cost. The TOKO CBT 
series helical filter provides 
an outstanding bandpass 
and stopband response, but 
most significantly of all 
from the point of view of 
those of you wishing to 
duplicate this converter, it 
is supplied prealigned and 
requires virtually no trim- 
ming to optimize align- 
ment. 




Photo B. An exploded view of the 2-pole version of the 

helical filter. 



Although a VHF convert- 
er usually requires consid- 
erable expertise and re- 
course to a selection of 
signal generators and other 
analytical equipment, the 
converter can be built by 
anyone with kit building ex- 
perience and a multimeter. 

Circuit Description 

Fig. 1 shows the com- 
plete circuit diagram C1 g 
C2, and LI provide the op- 
timum noise match be- 
tween the 50-Ohm antenna 
input and the rf amplifi- 
er—this is a carefully de- 
rived selection of values, 



and not simply a haphazard 
choice from the junk box. 
Gate 2 of Q1 is biased at 5 V 
(externally derived — i.e., 
from the main receiver or 
tuneable i-f— negative-go^ 
ing age may be applied at 
this point by those with ade- 
quate confidence and expe- 
rience), The source of the rf 
amplifier, Q1, is then taken 
directly to ground to ensure 
minimum impedance. 

The drain of Q1 is taken 
to the supply through R3, 
which provides the correct 
terminating impedance to 
the helical resonator, L2, 



RF iHPUt 
<l44-l46MHi) 



5) IF OUTPUT 

(2fl-30fclHi! 




PiN 
CONNECTIONS 



Fig, 1. Circuit diagram. 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 69 




Photo C. The spectrum of the LO multiplier output (TO dB 
per vertical division, 20 MHz per horizontal division). 



which has an input and out- 
put impedance of approxi- 
mately 450 Ohms. The out- 
put of L2 is connected 
straight to the gate of the 
mixer, Q2, R5 providing the 
necessary extra load in par- 
allel with gate 1 of Q2 for a 
correct 45frOhm matching 
load 

The appearance in the 
market of low-cost helical 
filter blocks (Photo B) will 
probably change the ap- 
proach to VHF designs, 
since yet another circuit 
variable has now been sub- 
stituted by a building block 
that takes out most of the 
problems for the less- 
experienced designer and 
user More than 75% of the 
problems associated with 
VHF radio designs are sim- 
ply those associated with 
getting lost in the MHz as a 



result of the uncertainties 
of DIY coil designs. 

Helical filters will not sal- 
vage designs that fall into 
the all-too-familiar abyss of 
"dry" joints and a shortage 
of basic experience in han- 
dling components and a sol- 
dering iron — but these fil 
ters will help allay the fears 
of the more experienced 
audio constructor whose 
neat rf projects have always 
been relegated to the 
"pending'' tray, since the 
problems of alignment as- 
sociated with the green fin- 
gers of the rf engineer 
sometimes seem insur- 
mountable. 

Unlike the rf amplifier, 
the mixer does not use any 
dc bias on either of its 
gates This is because the 
amplitude of the local os- 
cillator injection voltage is 



designed to be sufficient to 
switch Q2 directly at 116 
MHz, thereby improving 
the intermediation perfor- 
mance of the converter. 
This technique is used in 
some professional receiv- 
ers and is similar in con- 
cept to the esoteric Schott- 
ky diode double balanced 
mixer — except, of course, 
that this system is single 
ended It is possibly the first 
time that this approach has 
been used in an enthusiast's 
constructional feature. Un- 
less you know better 

At the drain of Q2, the 

wanted mixer product (2ft- 
30 MHz) is selected in the 
tuned circuit formed by L3 
and C8 and matched at the 
secondary to 50 Ohms to 
feed the main receiver, It is 
this output network that 
mainly constitutes the 3-dB 
bandwidth of the converter. 
This means that the gain is 
approximately 25 dB at 144 
MHz, 28 dB at 145 MHz, 
and 25 dB at 146 MHz. This 
reduction of gain is of no 
consequence as the design 
has plenty in hand at all 
times. 

It should be noted that 
the ultimate sensitivity of 
any receiving system is de- 
fined by its noise figure and 
not its gain. This means that 
the sensitivity will be the 
same over at least 144-146 
MHz, although the S-meter 
might read slightly less at 
the band edges. 

The oscillator chain uses 
a 38 667-MHz crystal rath- 



er than the more usual 
116-MHz type Transistor 
Q3 serves the function of 
both oscillator and frequen- 
cy doubler, L4 tunes out the 
capacitive reactance pre 
sented to the third overtone 
crystal and allows fine ad- 
justment of its operating 
frequency, L5, C15, and CI 6 
select the third harmonic 
from the oscillator at 116 
MHz and match it into Q4 
where it is amplified to an 
adequate level to switch 
the mixer, Q2 The capaci- 
tive divider, C19 and C2Q, 
provide the necessary level 
and impedance adjustment 
to feed the oscillator injec- 
tion of approximately 2 
mW to gate 2 of Q2. 

On a general point about 
decoupling, note the way in 
which tuned circuits are de- 
coupled with capacitance 
and inductance, Taking the 
example of L3 {R8/C9L R8 is 
apparently superfluous. 

This presumes that there 
is zero ac impedance to the 
rf ground on the positive 
supply rail which — for rea- 
sons of the effects of lead 
inductance and the unpre- 
dictability of stray coupling 
at VHF — is certainly not 
always the case, Thus the 
low-pass fitter formed by 
the RC combination pro- 
vides a far more positive 
and reliable method for 
keeping the rf off the sup- 
ply line The danger of cre- 
ating a positive feedback 
loop somewhere in the 
physical (as opposed to the- 




Fig, Z PC board layout. 

70 73Magazine • April, 1982 



£ Q 2 n 



Ll .-TCI. 



C5 



f 




;CD — pm 



m — 



1 Q Qg-frt*- 







- ' ""ins 1 



5 cw i o 

[J «— M 



Fig. 3, Parts placement. 




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FP-707 Power Supply Si 45. 00 

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3&2S TH6DXX Conversion Kit to TH7DX $136.00 

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^See List ot Advertisers on page 130 



73Magazine * April, 1982 71 







Photo D. The completed converter PCB. 



oretical) circuit layout is 
(hereby greatly reduced. 

D1 provides reverse po- 
larity protection, which 
most readers with practical 
experience will have dis- 
covered is essential when 
connecting things up in a 
hurry Strangely enough, 
this simple and effective 
precaution is omitted from 
many designs. Perhaps 
more components get sold 
that way. 

Construction 
And Alignment 

Using the PCB and com- 
ponents placement guide 
[Figs 2 and 3), assemble the 
converter. Do not forget to 
solder the earthy legs of R1 , 
R5, R6. R7, R9, R13, R14, 
and R15 — and also the can 
legs of L2, IX L4. and L5. 
There are no critical or 
easily-damaged compo- 
nents, although due to their 
size it is advisable to leave 
the coils and helical filters 
until last. 

After construction is 
completed, remove any sol- 
der splashes, check for dry 
joints, and remove the flux 
residue Connect to a 12 V 
regulated power supply and 
cht^k that the current con- 
sumption is about 10 mA 
without the crystal fitted. 

Preset coils LI, L5, and L6 
so that their cores are flush 
with the top of their for- 

72 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



mers. At this stage, do not 
touch L2, 13; and L4, 

Connect a voltmeter be- 
tween Q3 emitter and 
ground; the voltage should 
be approximately 3.2 V, 
Plug in the crystal, and the 
voltage should rise to about 
3 5 V; slightly adjust L4 for 
maximum reading. Transfer 
the meter to Q4 emitter, 
and adjust L5 for maximum 
reading — which will be 
about 3.5 V If the crystal is 
removed, the voltage will 
fall to approximately 0.48 
V. Transfer the meter to the 
source of Q2 and adjust L6 
for maximum reading. This 
will be about 0.15 V to 0.3 
V, depending on the IDSS 
of Q2; there will be less 
than 01 V present with the 
crystal removed. 

Connect a 5(K)hm aerial 
to the 2-meter input and a 
suitable receiver to the out- 
put via a 50-Ohm coax lead 
Don't bother to tuck it all 
away neatly into a case/box 
just yet r since there is a 
reasonable chance that you 
will need to do some work 
on the unit to get every- 
thing working perfectly. 

Tune to a weak signal 
around 145 MHz [the out- 
put will tune to 29 MHz) 
and adjust L3 for maximum 
output using the receiver's 
own S-meter Adjust Jl for 



maximum signal-to-noise 
by ear, and do not use the 
S-meter if optimum results 
are required. Maximum 
gain does not coincide with 
minimum noise figure. 

Unless you have the nec- 
essary equipment to sweep 
the 2-meter band with a 
spectrum analyzer and sig- 
nal generator, do not adjust 
L2. There is little point any- 
way, as the helical resona- 
tor has been very accurate- 
ly set up during the course 
of its manufacture and test, 
and no improvement could 
be effected on the samples 
tested This is not unex- 
pected, as TOKO offers an 
unparalleled repeatability 
in their ranges of high quali- 
ty rf and i~f coils. Ex- 
perience has shown them to 
be suitable for most de- 
manding applications, and, 
indeed, there are hardly any 
high-quality receivers that 
do not use some. 

The bandpass character- 
istic over 144-146 MH/ 
shows a perfect textbook 
response (Photo C) The he- 
lical filters were originally 
designed for use by manu- 
facturers of Oriental "black 
boxes" If you take the lid 
off some Kenwood and 
Standard equipment, you 
probably will find one of 
these devices lurking near 
the receiver front end. 



The remaining adjust- 
ment is to put the converter 
onto the correct frequency, 
but this is not important 
unless the receiver itself 
has an accurate frequency 
readout If it has, then tune 
to a known frequency such 
as a beacon signal or a re- 
peater and adjust L4 so 
that output frequency cor- 
responds to the known in- 
put signal. For example, a 
repeater on R6 (145.75 
MHz) reads 29 75 MHz on 
the main receiver display. 

This completes the align- 
ment, and it is gratifying to 
be able to comment that no 
problems have occurred 
with stability in any ex- 
amples tested so far- 
doubtless due to the care- 
fully designed double-sided 
printed circuit board. 

Conclusions 

Once you are confident 
that all is well, fit the com- 
pleted PCB into an appro- 
priate container and fit 



Paris List 

(Capacitors are miniature plate 

ceramic.) 
CI— 27 pF 

C2, C20— 6,8 pF 

C3, C4 t C7, C14, C17 P C18- 
1000 pF 

C5, C6 P C13, C15 t C16— 22 pF 

C8— 4 J pF 

C9— 4700 pF 

CtO— .1 M F 

C11— 47 pF 

C12— 33 pF 

C19— 220 pF 

(Resistors are V* w carbon film.) 

Rl— 100k Q 

R2— 120RQ 

R3^470 Q 

R4, R7, R8,Rt2 t R17— TOO Q 

R5— 820 Q 

R6 T R10-22kQ 

R9— 680 Q 

R11 t R16— 33k G 

R13, R15-1KS 

R14— 4 Jk Q 

(AIJ coils are TOKO brand.) 

L1, L3, L6— MC108, 7.5 turns 

12— 272MT— 1006A 

L3— 154FN6439 

L4— KXNK3766 

01, Q2— 3SK88 

03, 04— BFW92 or 2N918 

(Watch pinout) 
X1— 36.667 MHz HG18U crystal 
Dl — 1N4146 

Misc: 7 mm Coil Can, printed cir- 
cuit board. 



¥ 



M PUT DBW 



-h if it gmiro 
. UK, 



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■HPinn BiiHimwr*: w in hz mq hi n; n 



frit El * 9f HMil Mil *F M lOli HI TIMWT HTRf 



. * * 







THE ROBOT 800 COPIES THOSE 
WEAK SIGNALS YOU USUALLY GIVE UP ON 



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w built-in demodulator 
makes it possible. 



I 






he Robot 800s built-in demodulator equals or exceeds the 
performance of those found on expensive stand-alone 

terminal units. 

We designed the Robot 800 terminal specifically for the ama- 
teur radio operators' needs. Unlike many terminals that re- 
quire costly externa! hardware and modifications, the Robot 
800 used with a standard TV monitor provides you with all The 
features and capabilities you need for a complete system for 
amateur radio operation. 

We consider our built-in demodulator the most important fea- 
ture of our 800, since the first function of any terminal should 
be to receive as many signals as possible, even weak ones or 
those under heavy QRM. 

The demodulator built into the Robot 800 equals or exceeds 
the performance found in expensive stand-alone terminals. 
This is because our demodulator employs separate two tone 
active discriminator filters 
for the demodulation of 
RTTY signal. 

Most demodulators share a 
given filter for several dif- 
ferent shifts to retune the fil- 
ter to obtain continuous 
shift tuning capability. 
However, this results in a 
serious compromise in de- 
modulator performance. 
But if you plan to use your 
terminal primarily for ama- 



Fig l 
OEMODULATOfl SLOCK DIGRAM 



F*KH# 

NJIDKJ 



> 



IMA 

MM 

til TCH- 



UlflTE* 



teur radio operation, the only shifts you need are those used 
in amateur radio, i.e.. 850 Hz wide shift or 170 Hz narrow shifts. 
By choosing the Robot 800 you will be getting a terminal with 
a demodulator that will provide you with unparalleled perfor- 
mance in receiving those weak signals that you usually would 
give up on. 

Other Robot 800 features Include: 

BAUDOT/ASCII Operation: O Split screen operation 

n Autostart o Programmable WRU □ On screen status and 

turning indicator D Current loop keyer for hard copy □ Pro- 
grammable narrow shift ID. 

For Morse Code Operation: d Morse autotrack a Side tone 
oscillator a Morse code trainer □ Speed Indicator 

SSTV Operating Features: The Robot Model 800 allows al- 
phanumeric characters to be typed on an SSTV format, dis- 
played on a TV monitor and transmitted as a normal SSTV 

picture.* 

For complete information 
on all the Robot 800s fea- 
tures, write for literature or 
visit your Robot dealer. 



tl?l MM 








LO* 

tiuei* 



C0MPUTEP 



>L 1 1. t. M 



IMHt 




MMU.O. 
0*1* TO 
COVPUTEA 



'The Model Btifl i* normally supplied with the IARU standard Low Tone" frequency pairs. 
Units with High Tone pairs ire available on special order {Model 600HJ 



[ROBOT 1 

ROBOT RESEARCH INC. 

7591 Convoy Court 
San Diego, CA 92111 *■* 
(714) 279-9430 



The Mod** 900 does not receive SSTV pictures The Robol Model 400 is necessary for this 



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Photo f . Bandpass at mixer input (10 dB per vertical divi- Photo F, The converter bandpass (2 dB per vertical division, 
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some form of rf connector 
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you do not already possess 
a standard of your own, 
then the BNC system is 
probably the best choice- 
Fitting a BNC connector to 
a cable is not the easiest 
task for the uninitiated, but 
it is worth persevering and 



acquiring the necessary 
skills, since the BNC system 
is probably the best gener- 
al-purpose rf connector 
available. 

The spectrum analyzer 
photographs were taken us- 
ing Tektronix and Hewlett 
Packard test equipment. 



Because the input and out- 
put frequencies are not the 
same, it was not possible to 
use the conventional tech- 
nique of sweeping a track- 
ing generator with the spec- 
trum analyzer. Instead, a 
Hewlett Packard 8640B sig- 
nal generator was swept by 
hand over 130-160 MHz 



while the spectrum analyz- 
er was tuned to a center fre- 
quency of 29 MHz. The re- 
sulting display was stored in 
the analyzer and photo- 
graphed with a Polaroid 
camera. The results speak 
for themselves and, best 
of all, are entirely repeat- 
.ible.l 



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74 73 Magazine * April 1982 



Our new RTTY 
headquarters 








We've grown to meet the needs of Amateur 

and Commercial communica- 
tions around the world. 



COME SEE 

THE ATR-6800. . . 

Now available with TELEX/ 
Radio interface, data encryption 
(DES algorithm or Microlog's 
"CRYPTOLEX"), time diversity, 
full duplex, ARQ code operation, 
expanded memory {12K CMOS 
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your commercial communica- 
tions applications, plus automatic 
computer training program 
modules for Morse code, 
Triads etc. 

THE ACT- I... 

The Amateur's answer for an 
economical full feature CW/ 
RTTY/SSTV system. Just listen 
for someone on the air com- 
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it'll probably be another ACT-1 
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to operate and easy on the 
pocketbook. 



Get a live "GN-THE-AIR" demo of your favorite 
MICROLOG systems at our new engineering and 
manufacturing facility in Gaithersburg, Maryland, 
conveniently located near the Montgomery 
County Airpark. You can operate the N3JL sta- 
tion on HF, VHF or just tune around the bands. 
The new address for our manufacturing and demo 
station is 18713 Mooney Dr, (like the airplane), 
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879. 

For technical assistance call (301) 258-8400. 

(301) 948-5307 is still the number for our execu- 
tive and accounting offices, TELEX: 908778, 



MICROLOG 



51 



*"5ee Usi of Advertisers on page J 30 



INNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 75 



Compugrams Are Here 

BASIC message handling 



William M Kahn WAbZZL 
I M W Highway 8, Space 3 
Lakeside CA 91040 



When I first began 
handling formal 
message traffic, I was im- 
pressed with the pro- 
fessional "Western Union" 
look of the amateur radio- 



gram forms published by 
the ARRL Several months 
later, the romance ended as 
I reorganized desk drawers 
for the umpteenth time to 
make* room for my ever- 



growing message file,* So, I 
began to design a program 

"FCC regulations (Section 
97.105) require retention of 
third-party traffic for one year. 



Program listing 



1 RBI * fifiFt FFM'Xm FCITOT • 

2 mt * BV H ML 1 firt fl rfiHN, Ji*~2L « 

3 KEH • 134*4} Hi&wri" 3 SFfiCE . 

4 EDS » Li*E?1t€ CR 9QM * 

10 a_5-PeirfT02* -RPPL FflDlCKSftl Fttmr 

29 P&IHTO72. *TM1£ Ffnf-F-fl! HILL FEltiFF fllfc fTOFE It? ffSSRQES* 

30 FtiPJMTG15f)&:llE:\T.CL<: 

40 CLEBR3200 INPtJI 'SELECT Q> lEYEWfl OR <2> WE IHPIJT, V:GLS: IFV=2THEH:n0e 

70 M=8 

fB FOPtt^lTDlO PRINTS. rt TtFUTTEAMrfi*. H* 

90 itfTJT'TOVJII IFfl^2THJU?0 

100 irfWTO$E5-S*.Rt.IFft-JTI€KiSe 

lie npynjxmicN t eipmi iFw=4n©u?o 

129 jrffUTFHONE-. Ff IFR^B€l«fO 

1Z8 JfffVT-CCFRECTHOflS 0=«0t£, 14CFD. 2=10, >**, 4<0C, 54t0£**fi IFfl=«30TCCt« 

14f* lFft-2TH£H?0 

150 IPft=3TWWJ 

160 IFftMTKEiJllO 

170 immmm 

1E8 ]FR=iIl£*JTej 

199 IlffUTWE COWECTIOfi: a=W0V*,ftl lFftI=lT*CH3Jtt 

W UtfUrTE: I I Si&tfWE'.TJ PKUfli&TftHl - 
210 ItfWEKEiYET' FFtn'.FI 
212 1FK=2T>«<240 
214 Iftt°nt€H359 
2if ]FH-4THEfCfO 
218 JFW=5THETC 
220 ifH>ffTHEM2 I 
IFtt*7T>Ett2S* 

i iFr^sTHOi:oo 

228 IRMCTCH 

2:$ HiJ=-i mwa (tif-w Lii^r Fii-fi cif<j Tir-n hi^i otkso 

240 K^J^Hf JCf-ftf «2J^*t L2f«Ll -:r^i C2f*CI 00 

295 ICt=Hl flif*l« fCt=nt P?**f CIf=tt TT^Tr Fir f* GOTO:** 



£60 H4*=HMMr-NI.A4J=--fiJ L«H*U P4faf>! C4J*C* ; T4I-T J P4f-Pl S0TO600 
27t1 H5f=HI HSJ 'ir Kj=irj UJ-LI F-I-Fi ftua fSl»TJ K5f=FJ GOTlKtt 

2S© h^hi iici=ra flcJM*t ui=li P£*#i ra^Ti Fir-r aWM 

2* i irrr-iii h7i^ii l:imj j=ti pri-ftj ojt^oo 

2ft vi mt- L - : t?j- iKj 

110 M^l^il »?i=«i THMI 

e» ft*0 CJ-' * IlfVPFftXtSS HGF£ HSmTFI . ■££. fc: P OS 1 tt&m 

n 

710 INPUT "EfJTEF: riWI TPRFFIC THIS SEFIES tfiSV& 0^ft0>" F" 0L$ IFP*1THEN*1<! 
ir#ur"PfiOCESS BGEE TRAFFIC Q=YE5, 0*IJ0>*.P IflMTHEtttQEt^SMS 

2«fc» FPi»nfie<ie:% 'MEs^flGE FETfir^L «» upc-ffn sectiop pfua 

:oia u^T*F«EpftFt mt - tnii mm mtn ^ jLHim- 

*eis» iiFtjTi-i.Hi' : en jmjTt-i.T:r:ii iminewn^ 

:!*V?t-l 'J.W 121 - ! ,i II#VT»-l, T2I 521 *€»1U0 

4o:o irfUTi-j*tci.£f»i r p:i.f:i j^/tj-i. i:i.r.t ini:4Ti€rj4iiu 

4040 INFUTi-l»H4lvC4f, Ml Mfit4l. W-ft4l Iiffi.rrn-i. Hi hi IFHC$TF©*4ilfl 
4050 JfiPU?i"LHS4 C5l,ttSf J ft5t,LSI i p5t Jt Kl IHPUT#*I* t»-# SW lFlt!6THEfJ4110 
4OC0 i/ruii-LH-r . ilcrNrf-fiifMef-F-fj Kl H$W!HLT4**S€| [FHCrTWOHiie 

4ero ijhhi-lh:j rri.rrrflrMrf.p-i c;t imirt-LT7 J. s?i ifm:s?meh41ig 

40S0 irWTt-l.^.CSf- 1181. f^L LSS.P3I, f^j lffvri-1, r5J*S8l IfH191HEH4UD 
40» HFUTt-l.K?f C?r?. I ft?f.L5M?|.R?l Ifn.fTt-t T?I. ??f IFFtHOTlCIttllO 

41W irf^Ti-LHf.i.r .ni-fii li,fi.fi tffuTt-LTt.n 
4Ue ||<WI-L£I IFtl^'ErX- WTrPRjrrTEi 
40 rPltfl"THIS SERIES <^*. ESIAiES" GCaClCftfe 

4110 F^limttriCHPlU0>.Tflfi<5>/Rif.SU IFnL2TVE!l4L 
4140 Pfiruh; :r CHP4 i^.TeT-'^ p?M2l IRlCne*4221] 
4i L jfl PRIHTH^r.CHPKlO'.THt^-.F^f.S:! lFn<4THEri4 
4160 FfiINTH«*CHPlMfi' ?flP(5>-R4^S4J IFli:5THEN4. 
4i7«l F^IHfHSr.CNPiaO);TftE imuzi® 

I F-cTriTbfi jh= mo«.th rHEiw: 

4l5f FR!MIHri.CMffrie> f ?*£ I -^0 

41?5 OBJttlCCW 

42WPPI»T>lSf,C»*r'l0> c ■■! 1:1 :'» ^TffiHZO 

4219 FKJffllGI.CWli-KP, T« J - J S9I iFftlOFHEIWl 

42^H?IU7Hi.C>#t<i«?,TRE^>.Ff.?f 



76 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



which would allow me to 
copy traffic directly onto 

my micro keyboard and 
store all my third-party mes- 
sages in a cassette data file. 

The program is written in 
Radio Shack Level II BASIC 
for the TRS-80 microcom- 
puter and occupies less 

than 6K of RAM. This in- 
cludes 3.2K reserved for the 



string inputs but does not 
include any overhead for 

the BASIC interpreter (12K 
of ROM in the TRS-flO). 
Users of other systems may 
have to adjust accordingly. 
As is, this program will han- 
die up to ten messages in 
the ARRL radiogram for- 
mat If you have less avail- 
able memory, just reduce 
this capacity to fit your own 



needs. Any micro with 4 K of 
available RAM should store 
up to four messages quite 

nicely. 

Operating the program is 
simple You begin by mak- 
ing keyboard entries of up 
to ten messages. The inputs 
for each message are in the 
same sequence in which 
they are normally received 



42:0 F*iriT.IJfUr fl En»€£ CD fXVlEU l€£SG££ Cf? C2) im MKT SEFIE5V: lF>2T*OCftie 

4240 BBuezeeee tRMtneteeB 

4259 trftfriME IJYEQffiD EliTfilES U-VES, JN0)"-:* CIS IRMTHEiea 
A2W JlfurRErffiD Ml A TAPE (1=VES. (Mlfr-.X IR**lG93£:Qm 
42?f) IMPUTPEMESS NOW TPfiFFK U-VES> 0=H0)%X; IR^ITHEPMQ 

4200 INPUriF ALL 7R1HFFIC FOR MOflTH IS \M WEk TVF'E 1 ELSE TYPE 0*. IC.CLSJFX^THEJK*? 
42?0 JflWTHJS SECTION U1LL RECORD THE Bit- LEV FRTfr FOR YOMR MOHTHLV 
SUmafiV pfiBGRHl PREFflFE TfiFE flM> PSESS ENTER UHBJ REfT-V" 
4368 W*0 PRINTI-LIt PBOff 

#na feiht p thrt*s at - rmr vor mm 

S9& miff*EN> SESStnr.BI) 

iWW WW PRESS ENTER TO C0HTlMUe%:: OS RETURN 

MHMJ UFUrENTES Oft CHW*£ SIftTUS <i=VES, (M»>"iX. RETURN 

28860 Fttl * MESSAGE PRINTOn SlGRCifTINE * 

20095 aS 

2033? QO51CU0Q9 |F>GTHEN3tt4G 

200 jifvpsthu&vsii 

28S40 GCad09e&.IFT1^T>CC3410 

2ww FMfrrK2f,nfHacisc?J*ocfuo>-tcr,af^^ 
2ee&8 gorciil«o:jf:<39ti£1£oos8 
2t«rn irffVT"5T*m*s\s2i 

20*80 G0?UElB^:IFIK:TCN3Hlii 

soiee cosuBuoee j f: :=OTHErj2tu?o 

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£0110 PR1MTIW; CHRf<i6)jC4$i Q£ l<lfi>iltt£ CHtKlOX IHft WHlQ),L<lf j QftlClO)* P4I, Off* U0),OF1<1P). HfiBftl il(<\ PAS-SAi 

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2921© PftlHTHSfc CHPI C«)i C£l, C"HPf UOh IIGU CHRf (10); f£*j CWU0>; L6$i MKIOJ. Hti CHRf Ufti CHRSUOT, Tffi CHRKlft)* Rdf, S*T 

2822* (m&imXFM-gTHEM2!£4i[i 

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38040 mtn*-Ltcs>c:t*ici>m,\Jt*Fzt,F:t mmi-LT2t t $:i iFtt^imroiift 

30050 PRlNn-i.H4T J C4I..H4r^4M«^F4l-f:m FFIIlTl-l,T4liS4l IFn^TKE?O120 
3G060 PRIHTH-li HSIj C'51^ f^l, R5li L5$j PS*. RSI PR1MHP-L T5t, S51 i JRK6THEH: 0120 

?00r0 PPIIITH-I.Htf^ef-fJtXfl^r.UJ, Ft'r.pflF'PJflTfl'l^T^J.-rCf IFHCTHEIC0128 



30G80 PRirfTt-LHri.crJ-rjrLarfpLri-Frr f:i rsifiTi-LT7i-sri 


[FNC8THBC8I20 


30CW PRirJTl-L^r >C£l,»ISf,R9f.L?T'FtI,R"I FflMTl-MSJpSSt 


tFm?r>CK3tiie 


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38UDPWHTHLHf.Cl.T*f.ftl,Lt,prPl PFlrfTl-; TJ : ; 




3O120 Ffi1IJTt-i. ,p 'S«P WlTfl" 




39138 PRIOT'rftTft DW COtfLnE-' RETLWI 





off the air (lines 80-200). The 
transmrtting station usually 
gives a "break" before 
sending the actual text, and 
line 130 provides an oppor- 
tunity to correct any errors 
or missed copy up to that 
point Following the TEXT 
& SIGNATURE" input rn 
line 200, enter the informa- 
tion required in the 
"RECEIVED FROM" sec- 
tion of the radiogram form 
The second statement in 
line 200 recalls the message 
number and precedence in 
case the message heading 
has scrolled off the display 
screen. (It can be embarras- 
sing to acknowledge 
receipt of a message when 
you have forgotten the 
number;} When you are 
finished entering traffic, 
each message entered is 
displayed in subroutine 
20000 and the STATUS" of 
each (corresponding to 
-SENT" on the ARRL form) 
is entered You may then 
continue making entries or 
dump what you have into a 
data tape (subroutine 
30000). 

Note the branching 
arguments and string com- 
parisons in lines 212-310. 
These allow repeated use of 
a single string set (H$, N$, 
etc) for the inputs and 
assign the final string 
names when each message 
is complete. On the tenth 
run, there is no change of 
string names, 

Once you have estab- 
lished a message data file 
on tape, you can make in- 
puts from this file at the be- 
ginning of each run (lines 
4010-4110), Lines 4120-4220 
print the "HEADING/' 
"RECEIVED FROM/' and 
'STATUS" sections of each 
message for a quick review. 
You may then either load 
the next series from the 
tape or review each mes- 
sage and make additional 
keyboard entries. Note that 
if you wish to combine tape 
and keyboard inputs in the 
same run, you must make 
the tape input first The 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 77 












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number of messages avail- 
able for keyboard input de- 
pends on the number load- 
ed from the tape. 

Since each "TEXT & SIG- 
NATURE" input is a single 
string containing a max- 
imum of 255 characters. 
some kind of line-length 
control is necessary in order 
to avoid breaking up words 
at the end of each line of 
text. Careful use of the 
space bar will accomplish 
this, but it consumes string 
space in the process. I pre- 
fer to use the "down-arrow" 
key on the TRS-80 key- 
board. It performs a line 
feed/carriage return func- 
tion without wasting 
memory and is excellent for 
separating the signature 
from the body of the text. 

Notice the tape input 
and data dump se< fions 
(lines 4000-4110 and sub- 
routine 30000). These func- 
tions are executed bv the 
"INPUT#" and "PRINT#" 



statements. The phrase 

— V is required in Level II 

BASIC for multiple cassette 

deck control. 

The series of "PRINT 
CHR$(10)" statements in 
subroutine 20000 execute 
the ASCII control code for 
"line feed/carriage return 
The same result can be ob- 
idined by using separate 
PRINT statements for each 
string. 

Finally, lines 42MW310 
are keyed to a separate but 

related program which 
automatically computes 
monthly traffic statistics 
from the data file. There is 
no effect on the resident 
program and the inputs are 
easily bypassed. 

Whether you are present- 
ly handling a lot of traffic, % 
little traffic, or are now 
tempted to try traffic han- 
dling for the first time, I 
think you will find this pro- 
gram to be valuable and 
fun to work with ■ 




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When purchased with Cushcrafi. HyGam 
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CT210/C1320 Headphones 22. 

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KT34A 4- Element Tnband Beam 
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144 148 *3LB 2m 13- Element wrttri balun 
144-148 16C 2m 16-Element for oscar 
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— CALL FOR QUOTES — 
Send stamp for a flyer. Terms: Prices do not 
include shipping. VISA and Master Charge ac- 
cepted. 2% discount for prepaid orders 
| cashier's check or money order) COD fee 
S2,00 per order Prices subject to change 
without notice or obligation. 



78 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



**See List oi Advertisers on page 130 



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**Sfre Lrst at Advertisers on page 130 



73Magazine * April, 1982 79 



MFJ DELUXE Versa Tuner II 

$139.95 buys you one of the world's finest 300 watt antenna tuners 
with features that only MFJ offers, like . . . dummy load, SWR, forward, 
reflected watt meter, antenna switch, balun. Matches everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, random wires, balanced lines. 

MFJ*s Best Versa Tuner II . . . 

Built-in SWRi Wattmeter, dummy 

toad s antenna switch* 





This is MFJ's best Versa Tuner II. And one of 
the world's Imest 300 watt (RF output) tuners. 

The MFJ-949B Deluxe Versa Tuner I gives 
you a combination of Quality, performance, and 
features that others can't touch at this price . . . 
or any price. 

PERFORMANCE: You can run your full - 
ceTvef power output — up to 300 watts RF out 
put — and match your transmitter to any feedline 
from 1.8 thru 30 MHz whelher you nave coax, 
balanced line or random wire, 

FEATURES: A 200 wail 50 ohm dummy load 
lets you tune up for maximum performance. 

A sensitive meter lets you read SWR with only 
5 warts and both forward and reflected power m 
two ranges (300 and 30 watts) 



A flexible antenna switch lets you select 2 
coax lines direct or thru tuner, random wire or 
balanced line and dummy load. 

A large efficient airwound inductor 3 inches in 
diameter gives you plenty of matching range and 
less losses lot more watts out. 

1:4 balun. 1000 voM capacitors. SO 239 coax 
connectors, finding post for balanced line, random 
wire, ground. All aluminum cabinet. 10x3x7 ins. 

QUALITY : Every single unit is tested tor per 
forma nee and inspected for quality. Solid American 
construction, quality components. 

The MFJ 949B carries a full one year uncon 
ditional guarantee. 

Order from MFJ and try it - no obligation. If 
not delighted, return it within 30 days for a re 



fund (less shipping). 

To order, -imply call us toll free 800 647 1800 
and charge it on your VISA of Master Charge or 
mail us a check or money order for $139.95 
plus 54 00 for shipping/ hand hng. 

Don't wail any longer to tune out that SWR 
and enjoy solid QSO's Order your Deluxe Versa 
Tuner ll today Call MFJ or see youf dealer. 



CALL TOLL FREE ... 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 for techuirul information, or 
der/repair status. Also call 601-323 5869 outside 
continental USA and in Mississippi. 

MC I ENTERPRISES, 

IVl rV INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 



MFJ Dual Tunable SSB/CW Filter 

lets you zero in SSB/CW signal and notch out interfering signal at the 
same time. Primary Filter has tunable peak, notch, lowpass, highpass. 
Auxiliary Filter has peak, notch. Noise limiters for SSB, CW. 

Adjust primary filter for optimum 

. Use auxiliary filter 
to eliminate interference. 




Tfie MFJ-752B Signal Enhancer dual tunable 
active fillet system gives you signal processing 
performance and flexibility that others can't match 

For example, select ouumurn Primary Fitter 
mode fo* SSfl signal, zero m with frequency con- 
trol and adjust bandwidth (or best response. 
Then with the Auxiliary Filler notch out an inter 
fenng heterodyne . , . or peak the desired signal. 

For CW, peak both Primary and Auxiliary Fil- 
ters for narrow bandwidth to gtve skirt selectivity 
that others can't touch. Or use Auxiliary Filter to 
notch out a nearby QSn 

The Primary Filter lets you peak, notch, low 
pass, or highpass signals with double tuned filter 
for extra steep skirts. The Auxiliary fitter lets 
you notch a signal to 70 db Or peak one with a 
bandwidth down to 40 Hz. 



Tune belli Primary and Auxiliary Filters from 
300 to 3000 Hz. Vary the bandwidth from 40 Hz 
to almost flat. Notch depth to 70 ob 

MFJ Has solved problems that plague other 
tunable filters to give you a constant output as 
bandwidth t$ varied. Arid a linear frequency con- 
troL And a more effective notch filter. 

Works with any rig. Plugs into phone |ack 2 
watts for speaker. Inputs for 2 rigs. LED tor power. 

Switchable noise llmfter for Impulse noise; 
trough clipper removes background noise. 

Simulated stereo feature for CW lets ears and 
brain reject QRM. Vet hear off frequency calls. 

Speaker and phone jacks. Speaker is disabled 
by phones, OFF bypass filter. 1 0x2x6 ins, 9-16 
VDC or 110 VAC with optional AC adapter. $7.95. 

Every single unit is tested for performance and 



inspected tor quality. Solid American construction 
Order Irom MFJ and try il - no obligation, II 
not delighted, return it within 30 days lor relund 
(less stripping). One year uncondttionat guarantee 
Order today. Call toll free 800 647 1800. Charge 
VISA t MC or mail check, money order for $89.95 
plus $4.00 shipping/handling lor MFJ-752B. 

Don'1 wart any longer to tune out interfering 
signals, order now. Call MFJ of see dealer, 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 tor technical information, or 
der/repair status, Also call 601 323-5869 outside 
continental USA and in Mississippi. 

MC I ENTERPRISES, 

IVl rV INCORPORATED 

Box 494. Mississippi State. MS 39762 



80 73 Magazine • April, 1982 




5 MODES: CW, Baudot ASCII, memory keyer, 
Morse code practice. TWO MODELS: MFJ-49B, 

$339.95. 256 character buffer, 256 character mes- 
sage memory, automatic messages, serial numbering, 
repeat/delay. MFJ-494, $279.95. 50 character buffer, 
30 character memory, automatic messages. 



Mf J brings you a parr of 5 Mode Super Key- 
boards that gives you more features per dollar 
than any other keyboard available You can send 
CW, Baudot, ASCII. Use it as a memory keyer 
and for MORSE code practice. 

Voti get text butter, programmable and auto- 
matic messaoe memories, error deletion, buffer 
preload, buffer bold, pins much more. 

MODE 1: CW 

The 256 character (SO for 494) text buffer 
makes sending perfect CW effortless even if you 
"hunt and peck." 

You can preload a message into the butter and 
transmit when ready. For break m, you can stop 
the butter, send comments on key paddles and 
then resume sending the butler content. 

Delete errors by backspacing. 

A meter gives buffer remaining or speed. Two 
characters before buffer lull the meter lights up 
red and the sidetone changes pitch. 

Four programmable message memories (2 for 
494} qive a total of 256 characters (30 for 494}. 
Each message starts after one ends for no 
wasted memory. Delete errors by backspacing. 

To use the automatic messages, type your call 
into message A. Then by pressing the CO button 
you send CO CO DE (message A). 

The other automatic messages work the same 
way: CO TEST DE, DF, QRZ. 

Special keys for KN. SK, BT< AS, A A and AR. 

A lot ot thoughl has gone into humai. engineer- 
ing these MFJ Super Keyboards. 

For example, you press only a one or two key 
sequence to execute any command 

All controls and keys are positioned logically 
and labeled clearly for instant recognition. 

Pets are used for speed, volume, tone, and 



weight because they are more human onented 
than keystroke sequences and they remember 
your settings when power is off- 
Weight control makes your signal distinctive 
to penetrate ORM. 

MODE 2 ft 3 (RTTY): BAUDOT & ASCII 

5 level Baudot is transmitted at 60 WPM 
Both RTTY and CW ID are provided. 

Carnage return, line feed, and "LTRS" are sent 
automatically on the first space after 63 charac- 
ters on a line. This gives unbroken words at the 
receiving end and frees you from sending the 
carriage return. After 70 characters the function 
is initiated without a space. 

All up and down shift is done automatically. 
A downshift occurs on every space to quickly 
clear garbled recepboa 

The butter, programmable and automatic mes 
sages, backspace delete and PTT controt (keys 
your rig) are included. 

The ASCII mode includes all the features of 
Baudot. Transmission speed is 110 baud. Both 
upper and lower case are generated. 

MOPE 4: MEMORY KEYER 

Plug in a paddle to use it as a deluxe ruii 

feature memory keyer with automatic and pro 

grammable memories, iambic operation, dot-dash 

memories, and all the features of the CW mode. 

MODE 5: MORSE CODE PRACTICE 

There are two Morse code practice modes. 
Mode 1: random length groups of random charac- 
ters Mode 2; pseud o random 5 character groups 
in 8 separate repeatable lists (with answers). 

Insert space between characters and groups to 
form high speed characters at slower speed lor 
easy character recognition. 



Select alphabetic or alphanumeric plus punc- 
tuation. You can even pause and then resume. 

MORE FEATURES 

Automatic incrementing serial number from 
to 999 can be inserted into buffer or message 
memory for contests. 

Repeal function aiJows repetition ot any mes- 
sage memory with 1 to 99 seconds delay. Lets 
you call CO and repeat until answered 

Two key lockout operation prevents lost charac- 
ters during typing speed bursts. 

Clock option (496 only) send time in CW. Bau 
dot, ASCII. 24 hour format. 

Set CW sending speed before or while sending 

Tune switch with LED keys transmitter for tun- 
ing. Tune key provides continuous dots to save 
finals. BuiJt in sidetone and speaker. 

PTT (push -to -la Ik) output keys transmitter for 
Baudot and ASCII modes. 

Reliable solid state keying for CW grid block, 
cathode, solid state transmitters {300V, 10 ma 
Max, + 300V, 1 00 ma Max). TTL and open col- 
lector outputs for RTTY and ASCII. 

Fully shielded. RF proof. AN aluminum cabinet, 
mack bottom, eggshell white top. 12 f, Dx7 K, W*1 WH 
(front) x3Vi"H (back). Red LED indicates on, 

9-12 VDC or 110 VAC with optional adapter 

MFJ-494 is like MFJ-496 less sequential num 
bering, repeat/delay (unctions. Has 50 character 
buffer, 30 character message memory. Clock op^ 
tion not available for MFJ-494. 

Every single unit is tested for performance and 
inspected for quality. Solid American construction. 

OPTIONS 

MFJ 53 AFSK PLUG IN MODULE. 170 and 850 
Hz shirt. Output plugs into mic or phone patch 
Jack lor FSK with SSB rigs and AFSK with FM or 
AM rigs. $39.95 ( + $3). 

MFJ 54 LOOP KEYING PLUG IN MODULE. 300V, 
60 ma loop keying circuit drives your RTTY print- 
er. Opto isolated TTL input for your computer to 
drive your printer $29.95 ( + S3>. 

MFJ-61 CLOCK MODULE (MFJ 496 only) Press 
key to send time in CW. Baudot or ASCII 24 hour 
formal. 529 95 ( + S3). 

110 VAC ADAPTER. $7 95 ( + $3). 

BENCHER IAMBIC PADDLE. $42,95 ( + $4). 

A PERSONAL TEST 

Give the MFJ 496 or MFJ-494 Super Keyboard 
a personal test right in your own ham shack, 

Order one from MFJ and try it — no obligation. 
See how easy it is to operate and how much 
more enjoyable CW and RTTY can be. If not de- 
lighted, return it within 30 days for refund (less 
shipping). One year unconditiona^guarantee^ 

To order, call toll free 800 647-1800 Charge 
VISA. MC< or mail check or money order for 
$339.95 for MFJ 496. $279.95 for MFJ 494, 
$39,95 tor MFJ 53 AFSK modute. $29.95 for 
MFJ-54 Loop Keying module, $29.95 for MFJ 61 
Clock module, $7.95 for the 110 VAC adapter 
and $42.95 tor Bencher Paddle. Include $5.00 
shipping and handling per order or as indicated in 
parentheses if items are ordered separately. 

Why not really enjoy CW and RTTY? Order your 
MFJ Super Keyboard at no obligation today. 



TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

CALL TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 



Call 601 323 5869 for technical information, 
order/repair status. Also call 601 323 5869 out 
side continental USA and in Mississippi, 

Write for FREE catalog, over 80 products 

■JIB I ENTERPRISES, 
lYIlV INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 






**$ee Lis J ot Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine * April, 1982 81 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



Listings in this column are 
provided free of charge on a 
space available basts The 
following information should be 
included in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state* admis- 
sion charge (it any), features, 
talk-tn frequencies, and the 
name of whom ro contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month m 
which the event takes place. 

FLEMINGTON NJ 
APR 3 
The annual Ftemington NJ 
Hamfest will be held on Satur- 
day, April 3, 1982, from 8:30 am 
to 3:30 pm at the Hunterdon 
Central High School Field 
House, Flemington NJ, located 
between New York City and 
Philadelphia at the intersection 
of Rtes, 202 and 31 , just 10 miles 
south of 1-78. Admission is a 
$3.00 donation. There will be a 
ftea market with a large heated 
indoor area, 200 tables, major 
manufacturers, and more. Talk- 
in on 146.52, 147.015, 2241 2. and 
224.54. For reservations or fur- 
ther information, call (201)- 
7884080. or write Cher ryvi lie 



Repeater Association, c/o 

W2FCW T Box 76 t Farview Drive, 
Annandale NJ 08801. 

MEMPHIS TN 

APR 3 

The Memphis Mini-Fest will 
be held on Saturday, April 3. 
1982, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
at the Pipkin Building m the Mid 
South Fairgrounds. Admission 
is $1,00. Flea market space is 
$5.00 or 2 spaces for $8.00 (bring 
your own tables and chairs; none 
will be furnished). Doors will be 
open at 6:00 am for unloading. 
There will be a hospitality party 
Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. For 
further details, contact Clayton 
Etam K4FZJ, President, Mid 
South Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion, 28 N, Cooper Street, Mem- 
phis TN 38104, or phone 
(9Ql)-274 4418 (days) or 
(90 1)473-67 14 (nights). 

ROCHESTER MN 
APR 3 
The Rochester Amateur Ra- 
dio Club and the Rochester Re- 
peater Society will sponsor the 
Rochester Area Hamfest on 
Saturday; April 3 T 1982, at John 
Adams Junior High School, 1525 



NW 31 Street, Rochester MN. 
Doors will open at 8:30 a.m. 
There will be a large indoor flea 
market for radio and electronic 
items, prize raffles, refresh- 
ments, and plenty of free park- 
ing, Talk-in on 146-22/. 88 
(WRQAFTi For further informa- 
tion, contact RARC, c/o 
W&JYEE, 2253 Nordic Ct. NW\ 
Rochester MN 55901. 

OAK RIDGE TN 
APR 34 

The Oak Ridge ARC will hold 
the fourth annual Oak Ridge 
Hamfest on April 3-4, 1982, at 
the Civic Center, Oak Ridge TN, 
from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Admis- 
sion is $3.00 and accompanied 
children will be admitted free. 
There will be an indoor dealer 
display, forums, prizes, conces- 
sions, and an outdoor flea mar- 
ket. Talk- in on 146. 281.88, 
147.72/. 12 (backup), and 146,52, 
For more information, send an 
SASE to ORARC Hamfest, Attn: 
Jim McNair N4EXG, PO Box 291 , 
Oak Ridge TN 37830, 

MADISON Wl 
APR 4 

The Madison Area Repeater 
Association, Inc. (MARA) t will 
hold its tenth annual Madison 
Swapfest on Sunday, April 4 t 
1982* at the Dane County Expo- 
sition Center Forum Building, 
Madison Wl. Doors will open at 





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BELDEN Coax in 100 It rolls 

RG8U #3208 S24.95 

Grounding strap, heavy duly tabula/ braid 

3/16 In. tinned copper 10c/!t. 

3/S in. tinned copper. _.3<tertL 



POLYETHYLENE DIELECTRIC 

RQBX95% shield (black, white or orayj S13.9Wl0O!t. 

RG2l3noncontaminatirig95% shield rnH spec 36c/ft. 

RG174/U mil spec. 96% shield ...OBc/lt. 

ftGHU96 k1 ; shield, 75-ohm mil spec 25*/lt. 

RGSU 96% shield, mil spec. .„..„.....„ SIcHl. 

RG6AAJ double shield, 75-ohm. 2$*/ft 

RG55A (RG223? double silver shield, 5Ck>hm aS*/H. 

RG5B mil spec. 96% shield, 1 1 c/tt 

LOW LOSS FOAM DIELECTRIC 

RG8U 80" t shield.,.. ... ISt/tt 

RG5BU3G*/* shield...^ 07*tft 

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RG59U 100% loJI shield, TV type 07«/fi 

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CONNECTORS MADE IN USA 

ft mpnfiripi rl"tjii,.. i ..., ,. .lj......,,.. m ...p>niiin« ' "5* 

PL-2S9 push-on adapter shell., 1QJS3.B9 

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Double Male Connector,., $1.79 

P L- 258 Double Fema re Connector .. 9Bc 

ift patch cord w.'RC A type plugs each end 3/S 1. 00 

Reducer UG-175 0' 176 - 10/f 1.9® 

UG 255 (PL-259 to BNQ _ $3-50 

Elbow (M359) S1.7S 

F59A<TVt^p^« 10/12,15 

UG 21D/U Amphenol Type N Male lor AGS... 13.00 

BNC UGaaC/U, male $1 .25 



3/18 inch Mike Plug forCollrns etc. $1.25 



Connectors— shipping 10% add'l, $1.50 minimum 

FREE CATALOG 
Cable- Shipping S3 00 1st 100 ft . $2 00 each add t 100 ft COD idd f 1 ,50- FLA. ftu add 4% Salts Tax 



5685 SW 80th. Street Depl RLO Miami FL 33143 Call (305) 66 14534 
Come See Us At The Dayton Ha mvention 



***412 



8:00 am for sellers and exhibi- 
tors and at 9:00 am for toe pub- 
lic* Admission is S2.50 per per- 
son in advance and $3.00 at the 
door. Children twelve and under 
will be admitted free. Tables are 
$4,00 each in advance (early res- 
ervations are recommended) 
and $5.00 at the door. Features 
will include a flea market, com- 
mercial exhibitors, and door 
prizes, as well as an all-you-can- 
eat pancake breakfast and a 
bar-b-q lunch. There are hotel 
accommodations nearby and 
plenty of parking space. Talk-in 
on 146.16/76 WR9ABT. For res- 
ervations or more information, 
write to MARA, PO Box 3403, 
Madison Wl 53704. 

GROSSE PQINTE Ml 
APR 4 

The Southeastern Michigan 
Amateur Radio Association 
(SEMARA) will hold its 24th an* 
nual hamfest swap and shop on 
April 4 h 1982, from 8:00 am to 
3:00 pm at the Grosse Pointe 
North High School, Vernier 
Road (between Mack and Lake- 
shore), Grosse Poinie Ml. The 
admission charge is $1.00 in ad- 
vance and $2.00 at the door. 
There will be good food, plenty 
of free parking, door prizes* 
cash prizes, and a grand prize 
drawing. Talk-in on 147.75/. 15. 
For further information, please 
send an SASE to SEMARA Swap, 
PO Box 646, St, Clair Shores Mi 
48083, or phone Ray Ninness 
WD8KXN at (313)777-0119. 

FRAMINGHAM MA 
APR 4 

The Framingham Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
6th annual spring flea market on 
Sunday, April 4 t 1962, at the 
Framingham Police Station drill 
shed, Framingham MA. Admis- 
sion is $2,00. Sellers' tables are 
$8.00 before March 27, and 
$10.00 after that date. Doors will 
open at 1 0:00 am but sellers may 
begin setting up at 8:30 am. 
Radio equipment, computer 
gear, food, and bargains will be 
available. Talk-in on 75/.15 and 
.52. For more information, con- 
tact Ron Egatka K1YHM, 3 Oris- 
coil Drive. Framingham MA 
01701. or phone {617V877-4520. 

SOMERSWORTH NH 
APR 17 

The Great Say Radio Assocla* 
tion will hold its 2nd annua! 
Hamfest-Flea Market on Satur- 
day. April 17, 1982, from 9:00 am 
to 3:00 pm al the Somersworth 



82 73 Magazine • April, 1982 







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73 Magazine • AprilJ982 83 



Armory, Somersworth NH. The 
entrance fee is $1 .00 per person 
and the ticket counts toward 
door prizes. There will be an 
tique radios and computers on 
dispfay 1 hourly door prizes, and 
a grand raffle for a Radio Shack 
color computer as wetf as other 
prizes. Free parking. Food and 
refreshments will available. 
For advance reservations and 
further information, call Dick 
Sedgewick N1EX at (6Q3J-742- 
3703. or write Great Bay Radio 
Association. Rte, 16, Dover NH 
03820. 

SCHERERV1LIE IN 
APR 17 

The Lake County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 29th an- 
nual Herb S. Brier Memorial 
Banquet on April 17, 1982 t at The 
Ember's Steak House, 1112 
Route 41, Schererville IN. 
Tickets are $8.50 and can be ob- 
tained by writing to PO Box 
1909. Gary IN 46409, No tickets 
will be sold at the door. 

WEUESLEY MA 

APR 17 

The Wellesley Amateur Radio 
Society will conduct its annual 
auction on Saturday, April 17. 
1982. at the Wellesley High 
School cafeteria. Rice Street, 
WellesJey MA. Doors open at 
10:00 am. Talk-in on .63/>03 t 
.G4/.64, and .52. For further in- 
formation, contact Kevin P. Kel 
ly WA1YHV, 7 Lawn wood Place. 
Charlestown MA 02129. 

GRAND JUNCTION CO 
APR 17 

The Grand Mesa Repeater So- 
ciety will hold the third annual 
Western Slope Swapfest on Sat- 
urday, April 17, 1982, from 10:00 
am to 4:00 pm at the Plumbers 
and Steamfitters Union HalL 
2384 Highways 6 anil 50. Grand 



Junction CO. Admission is free 
and swap tables are $5.00. Fea- 
tures will include an auction, 
door prizes, and refreshments. 
Talk-in on .22/.S2. For further in- 
formation, send an SASE to Dale 
Ellis KD0M, 588 Starlight Street, 
Grand Junction CO 81501, or call 
(303H34 5981. 

JACKSON MS 
APR 17 18 

The Jackson Amaieur Radio 
Club will host the ARRL 
Mississippi State Convention on 
April 1748, 1982, at the Ray- 
mond Road National Guard Ar- 
mory, Jackson MS. Admission is 
free. Hours are noon to 5:00 pm 
on Saturday and 8:00 am to 2:00 
pm on Sunday. Activities in* 
elude forums, net and special 
activity group meetings, dealer 
exhibits, prizes, and flea market, 
Swap tables are $5.00 each day. 
Special rates are available at the 
Holiday Inn Southwest if you 
specify that you are attending 
the Jackson hamfest There will 
be a hospitality room at the 
hotel Saturday night and food 
will be available at the hamfest 
both days. Talk-In on 146.16/.76, 
146,52. and 3987.5. For swap- 
la ble reservations or further in- 
formation, contact Don Elder 
KC5VD, 2806 N. Mill Street, 
Jackson MS 39216. or phone 
(601^362-0336. 

TRENTON NJ 
APR 17-18 

The 7th Trenton Computer 
Festival will be held on Saturday 
and Sunday. April 17-18. 1982. 
from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm at 
Trenton State College, Trenton 
NJ. Admission for all activities 
is $5.00. Student admission is 
$3.00. Features will include 
commercial exhibits, an elec^ 
ironies flea market, many tech- 
nical sessions, and. on Sunday, 



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information write TCF^2, Tren- 
ton State College. Millwood 
Lakes CN550, Trenton NJ 08625, 
or call (609J-77 1-2487. 

PADUCAH KY 
APR 13 

The Paducah Amateur Radio 
Association Ham/Swap Fest 
will be held on April 18, 1982, 
from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm CST at 
the Paducah Jaycee Civic Cen- 
ter, Paducah KY. Admission is 
$1.00 and includes a free table. 
There will be net meetings and a 
flea market. TalMn on 
147.66/, 06, For more informa- 
tion, contact Bruce Huyck 
WD4BVW, Rte. 8, Box 431, 
Paducah KY 42001, or phone 
{502)-444-7725. 

SULLIVAN IL 

APR 18 

The 21st annual Moultrie 
Amateur Radio Klub Hamfest 
will be held on April 18. 1982. at 
the Moultrie County 4-H Center 
Fairgrounds, Caldwell Road, 
located 5 miles east of Sullivan 
IL There will be a heated indoor 
flea market and a large, covered, 
outdoor flea market There is no 
charge to vendors and space is 
on a first come, first served 
basis. Talk-in on 14694 and 
146.655/.055. For more informa- 
tion, write Ralph Zancha 
N9CDK, President, MARK, PO 
Box 55, Lovtngton IL 61937, or 
call (217^873-5287, 

RALEIGH NC 
APR 18 

The Raleigh Amateur Radio 

Society will hold its 10th annual 
hamfest on Sunday. April 18, 
1982, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at 
the Crabtree Valley Shopping 
Center parking area, Raleigh 
NC. Admission is $4.00; there 
will be a table charge for ex- 
hibitors and flea market dis- 
plays. First prize is a choice of a 
Kenwood TS-830S transceiver or 
an tcom IC-251A multi-mode 2m 
transceiver with a Mirage B108 
80-Watt amplifier. A hospitality 
room and party will be held the 
preceding evening from 7:00 pm 
to 10:00 pm. Talk-in on 146.04/ 
146.64 and 146.28/146.88 both 
days. For more information, 
please contact Ken Boggs 
KB4RV, 8704 Cliff Top Ct., Ra> 
leigh NC 27612, or phone (919>- 
782-8646. 

DAYTON OH 
APR 23 

The 13th annual B- A-S- H will 



be held on Friday night, April 23, 
1982, at the Dayton Hamvention 
at the Convention Center. Main 
and Fifth Streets, Daylon OH. 
Admission is free and parking is 
available in adjacent city ga- 
rage. Live entertainment, sand- 
wiches, snacks, and a COD bar 
will be available. Awards will in- 
clude a new synthesized HT and 
a synthesized pocket scanner. 
For further information, contact 
the Miami Valley FM Associa- 
tion, PO Box 263 T Dayton OH 
45401. 

SPOKANE WA 
APR 24 

The Inland Empire Amateur 
Clubs will hold the third annual 
Inland Empire Swap Fest on 
April 24, 1982, beginning at 9:00 
am at the Spokane Interstate 
Fairgrounds, Broadway and 
Havana, Spokane WA. Admis- 
sion is $1 00 and includes a 
special door prize raff Ee ticket. 
Regular raffle tickets are $.50. 
Activities include commercial 
and non-commercial displays, 
an auction, YL craft sales, a 
snack bar, a banquet at Roy's 
Chuckwagon, and a ffea market. 
Tables (4' x 8 1 ) are $5,00 per full 
table and exhibit space is free. 
Talk-in on 1 46.34/94 and 146.52 
For reservations for tables, ex- 
hibit space, and/or a free RV site 
(without electrical hookup), 
write Swap Fest, c/o Jan 
Thiemann KA7DDV, 78033 E 
Mission, Spokane WA 99206. 

BEMIDJI MN 
APR 24 

The Bemidji Amateur Radio 
Club will hold a swapfest on Sat- 
urday. April 24, 1982. starting at 
9:00 am at I he Holiday Inn, High- 
way 2 wesl. Bemidji MN. There 
will be door prizes, refresh- 
ments, and plenty of free park- 
ing. For more information, con- 
tact Bill Williams WAOABX, 
Rte. 1. Box 369 J -3. Bemidji MN 
56601. or phone (218K751-9070. 

DIXON IL 
APR 25 

The Rock River Amateur 
Radio Club will hold the 16th an- 
nual hamfest on Sunday, April 
25, 1982, at the Lee County 4-H 
Club Center, 1 mile east of the 
junction of Rtes, 52 and 30, 
south of Dixon IL. Advance 
tickets are a $2.00 donation; at 
the gate a $2,50 donation will be 
asked. Breakfast will be served 
from 6:30 am to 9:00 am and 
lunch will be served from 9:00 
am on, The grand prize is $500 



73 Magaztne * April, 1982 




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73 Magazine • AprilJMZ 65 



cash and the second prize is 
$200 cash. You need not be pres- 
ent to win these, but you must 
be present to win the hourly 
door prizes. Talk- in on 146.52. 
For advance tickets, write Ed 
Webb WD9CJS, 618 Orchard, 
Dixon I L 61021. 

BRAINTREE MA 
APR 25 

The South Shore Amateur Ra* 
dio Club of Braintree MA will 



hold an indoor flea market on 
Sunday. April 25, 1982, at the Vik- 
ing Club. 410 Quincy Avenue, 
Braintree MA from 11:00 am to 
4:00 pm. An entrance fee of 
$1 .00 will include one chance for 
the door prizes. Additional 
chances are 3 for $1.00. Plenty 
of parking will be available, The 
Viking Club will be open for ven- 
dors at 10:00 am. Eight-foot ta- 
bles will be available for $8,00 
each and may be reserved in ad- 



vance by sending a check pay* 
able to the South Shore Ama- 
teur Radio Club to Ed Doherty 
W1MPT, 236 Wildwood Avenue, 
Braintree MA 02184. For further 
information, call Ed at 
(617)^843-0510 or (617}-84^4431 
(evenings). 

LYNNFIELD MA 
MAY 1 

The Quannapowitt Radio 
Association (QRA) will hold an 



indoor/outdoor hamfest on Sat- 
urday, May 1, 1982. from 9:00 am 
to 4:00 pm at South Hail Fire Sta- 
tion, corner of Salem and Sum* 
mer Streets, Lynnfield MA. Ad- 
mission is $100 at the door 
Reserved tables are $5,00; at the 
hamfest, $7.00- Food will be 
available. Tallin on 146,19/79 
or .52. For additional details, 
write Dave Meldrum KA1M1, 28 
Cedar Lane, North Andover MA 
01845. 



HAM HELP 



Our club is in dire need of a 
service manual (or a Johnson 
Thunderbolt linear amplifier, 
catalog # 240-353. 

Ronald Daly WBttZNI 

Hot Springs 

Amateur Radio Club 

Box 385 

Hot Springs SD 57747 

I need schematics for the 
2-meter Edgecomm mobile 
radios 25A and 3000A. I will pay 
copy costs and postage. 

Rudolph Fallang KA7DTA 

71 7 B SE6th 
College Place WA 99324 

I am looking for a DG-5 digital 
display and a DS-1A dc-dc con- 
verter for a Kenwood TS-520S. 
Please state condition and 
price, including shipping. 

John P. lorio WD4MWH 

5228 Longview Dr. 

New Port Richey FL 33552 

I am looking for a Vocaline 
AT-30 420 MHz transceiver. 
These u n lis are very o ld t but I am 
sure that one can be found. 

Allen Harris 

3047 Worden St. 

Muskegon Ml 49441 

I am in need of a source for 
stainless spring rod in pieces 
that are five feet long and no 
more than 1/8" in diameter 
Tapered replacement CB whips 
are not quite long enough. 

Stan Hockman KA4DSK 

638 Fiager Blvd. 

Lake Park FL 33403 

Does anyone have issues of 
"Ham News," published byG.E. 
for at least six years (1946-1954) 
or +, Ham Tips" published by 
RCA in the early 1950s? I will 

86 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



copy your originals or pay for 
duplication. 

I am also in need of a Knight 
T-60 transmitter and a Star 
Roamer R-55 receiver In any con- 
dition. 

John a White WB6BLV 

560 North Indiana 

Porterville CA 93257 

An amateur in the Ivory Coast 
is looking for a RTTY program 
and interface to use with the 
Atari 800 computer. Can anyone 
help me to help him? 

Fred Trick, Sr. KB9UB 

Zetfred Company 

PO Box 265 

North Manchester IN 46962 

Wanted; Robot Model 70 
SSTV monitor, regardless of 
condition, 

Dante Vent Here KA4JRE 
17831 NW 81 Ave. 
Hlaieah FL 33015 

Wanted: amateur radio QSL 
cards prior to 1930 for old-time 
display. 

Dave Noon VE3IAE 

19 Honeysuckle Cr. 

London, Ontario 

Canada N5Y 4P3 

I need a schematic and 
operating manual for a Knight 
KG-2100 dc oscilloscope, 

Joe Bische KA4H AG 
3412 29th St W. 

Bradenton Ft 33505 

I am looking for a 5AHP7A 
CRT or the address of a dealer 
that carries them, 

Wayne Robot ham 

40 Thyra Ave. 

Toronto M4G 5G5 

Ontario, Canada 



I need a system to connect my 
home with a telephone approxi- 
mately two miles away. Does 
anyone know of wireless units 
that will cover that range? 

Alfonso Gallegos 

Ca sill a #3150 

Quito, Ecuador 

I would like to hear from 
anyone who has modified an 
A Ida 103 transceiver. 1 am par- 
ticularly interested in adding a 
digital readout and 10 meters. 

J. L Navarrete WB6MHN 

1903 Santa Ysabela 

Rowland Heights CA 91748 

Purple Heart, a national 
amateur radio chapter and net 
of combat wounded veterans, is 
being formed to affiliate with 
the Military Order of the Purple 
Heart, Inc. Eligible veterans are 
invited to write for information 
and application. 

Clem Harris KC5MM 

6110 Pecan Trail Dr. 

San Antonio TX 78249 

(512)-699*1420 

I need complete information 
on how to make a frequency 
converter in order to have an 
SB620 Scanalyzer set at an in- 
put of 455 kHz show a display 
from a Drake TR4CW , s 9-MHz M 

In order to prevent possible 
overload, could a very small 
sample be taken from the i-f and 
put through an amplifier before 
coupling to the SB620? 

Albertis G. Long KC9JY 

620 N. 3rd 
Boonvllle IN 47601 

I am trying to complete con- 
struction of the add-on capac* 
itance meter described in the 
February, 1981, issue of 73, I 
would appreciate hearing from 
anyone who has had success 
with this project. 

Tom Reel WB8UDQ 

5071 Tahquamenon 

Flushing Ml 48433 



I would like to get a complete 
history for the Hammarlund 
HQ-200 receiver. I am looking for 
the years it was made, modifica- 
tions, and any specialized sen 
vice manual as opposed to the 
regular operational manual I 
will pay for copying and postage 
or copy and return your original. 

D'arcy Brownrigg 
Chelsea, Quebec 
Canada J OX 1 NO 

I am returning home from Ger- 
many to the Rome/Cartersvilie, 
Georgia, area. Any job informa- 
tion for a First Class Ra- 
diotelephone and amateur Extra 
class licensee commencing in 
August would be most ap- 
preciated. 

E.G. Echols. Jr. 

WA2NYR/DA2EJ 

University of Maryland 

Jaeger Kas., Bldg. 26 

APO New York NY 09162 

I would (Ike to get a Novice 
license. Are there any nearby 
hams that could help me on my 
days off? An hour every other 
weekend would be a great help. 

Robert Good 
Box 86 

OverbrookKS 66524 
(91 3J-665-7483 

I need a service manual and 
schematic diagram for a 
Motorola T41GGV series 'Twin 
V" transceiver, I will pay 
reasonable copying costs or 
copy and return. 

Jeffrey Miller WD4SMA 

2112 Natahoa Court 

Falls Church VA 22043 

I am looking for manuals and 
specification sheets for 
Hallicrafters SX101 and SX42 
receivers. I will buy your 
originals or pay for copying. 

Bob Allie 

736 Pine St 

Central Falls Rl 02863 



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HM-10 Scannmg microphone ...„ 39,50 




IC-251A Microprocessor controlled 2 meter All-mode 

Transceiver for 143,8 148 1999 Mh*. 7digit display. 10 
watts, 3 memories, mem. scan & programmable band 
scan 600 KHz offsets, variable splits with two built-m 
VFOs, 13 Svdc or 117vac w/ampl, hand mic 4. "h* 
9*rw - 10'5-d. 11 lbs (Reg. $749)...... NOW $599. 95 



IC-451A UHF All Mode Transceiver lor OSCAR mode B 
or j & simplex For 430440 or 440-450 MHz. Features 
similar to the IC 251 A (Reg. $899)....... NOW $769 95 

ICAG1 UHF Pteampl.tar {Reg S89) NOW $79,95 



IC-551 All mode 6m transceiver tor 50-53,999 MHz 6 
digit display, 10 watts, 3 memory channels w/vartable 
scan, 2 VFOs & blanker. 13.8vdc I 117vac 4»*h" 
9Vw*lQl* M d, 14 lbs (Reg $479). ... NOW $399,95 

EX 106 FM adaptor (Reg $125) NOW 112 95 

EX 107 VOX unit (Reg $55) NOW 49.95 

EX IDS P8 tune/RF proc (Reg S105J ..NOW 94 95 

IC 5510 same as 551 but 80 watts EX- 107 & EX- 108 
built-in 13.8vdc 9 18A (Reg $699).-,, NOW 599 95 

PS-20 AC power supply (Reg. $229) NOW 199.95 

CF-1 Cooling tan tor PS-20. 45.00 

EX-I06 FM adaptor (Reg. $125) NOW 112.95 

IC 560 6 meter SSB, FM & CW Mobile Transceiver LED 
readout. 10 watts. 3 memories, memory scan & prog, 
band scan 600 KHz offsets, 2 VFOs 13 8 VOC @ 3.5A 
Microphone & mount (Reg. $489) NOW $43995 




VISA 




Call Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



SAVE $30 

IC-2AT Synthesized 2m FM Handheld 
with built-in T/T pad 800 channels in 5 
KHz steps 144 147 995 selected by 
thumb wheels & + 5 KHz upshift switch. 
± 600 KHr offsets With BP-3 250 ma 
nod pack output is IS LOW or 1 5* 
HIGH Optional packs for larger capac- 
ity or higher power Supplied with 250 
ma mead pack, wall charger, flexible 
antenna, belt clip, strap, earphone and 
plugs Mode I tC-2A does not have buil I 
in T/T pad. 6.6"h» 2.6***1.4^ lib. 

Regular SPECIAL! 
IC-2AT HT w/TTP, mead & chgr..., $269 50 $239,50 
IC 2A 2m HT w/nod & wall chgr. . . $239 50 214.50 
ML I 2.3/ lOw 2m mobile I irw&r ....... 8900 79.95 

IC-3AT 220 HT/nP. nuad & chgr.... 299.95 2€9.95 
IC-1A 220 HTmcad & charger 26995 249,95 

IC-4AT 440 HT/TTP, mead & chgr ... . 299 95 269.95 
IC-4A 440 HT/mcad & charger, ...... 26995 249.95 

BC-25U Ertra wall charger 12,50 

BC 30 Drop-in charger for BP-2,3 & 5 69.00 

BP-2* 450 ma, 7 2v mead pk, 1W output 39.50 

BP-3 Extra 250 ma mead pk, 1.5W output ...... 29.50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case........ ,,„, 12.50 

BP-5* 450 ma, 108v mead pk. 2.3W output ... 49.50 

CP-l Cig lighter plug & cord fBP 3).,. 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation module..... 17."50 

HM-9 Speaker/microphone 34.50 

Leathtr cjse {speedy radio) 34.95 

FA-2 Flexible antenna for 2A. 2AT [BNC] ID 00 

3A-TTN TTparJfor ZA, 3A, 4A .....39.50 

*BC 30 required to charge BP-2 & BP-5 

IC-2025 2 meter portable SSB Transceiver, 3W PEP 
output Uses regular "C" cells, optional Nicad pack & 
charger or IC-3PS AC supply/speaker With band mic 
whip antenna and strap (Reg. $279) NOW $249.95 

IC 201 2m. lOw ampl (Reg $98) ...NOW 89.95 
IC-402 432 Mhz portable SSB Transceiver Features 
same as IC 2025 above (Reg. $389}..... NOW $349.95 

IC-30L 10*-, 432 amp flteg, $105).,,. NOW 94 95 
IC-502A 6m SSB port (Reg. $239) NOW 214.95 

IC-3PE 3A ps/speakef (Reg $95) NOW 89.95 

IC-3PS ps/spkr ports [Reg $95) NOW 89,95 

SP4 Remote speaker ror portables 24.95 

Accessories: 

HM-3 Deluxe mobile microphone T $17,50 

HM-5 3 or 4 pin Noise can* microphone*..,.*.^ 34.50 

HM-7 8 pm amplified hand microphone 29.00 

HM-8 8 pm 1/1 microphone .„..„„.....„. 49,50 

HM 10 Scanning microphone (IC-720J 39 50 

SM-2 4 pin etectret desk miemphone........ 39,00 

SM-5 8 pin elect ret desk micropnone 39,00 

HP 1 Headphones 34,50 

New AES Branch Store: Clearwater, FL 
1898 Drew St. • Phone (813) 461-4267 

E-X-P-A-N-D-E-D WATS PHONE HOURS 

Our Milwaukee Headquarters will answer the 
Nationwide WATS line 1-800-550-0411 until 8 
pm (Milwaukee time) Monday thru Thursday 

HOURS: Mon . Tue, Wed & Frr 9-5:30; Tfturs 9-8. Sat 9-3 

j * i pj£U t \ CleanivAiitT \t<Hv-< tu.it opet) Thursday evpnirtj^j 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

I -800-242-5 t9S 



MhUVl 




W\i 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 

AES BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585 7388 

Ohio Wats 1-800-362-0290 

Outside Ohio 1-800-321-3594 



," See? List ot A&vmhsers on page f 30 



ORLANDO Florida 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. Wats 1-800-432-9424 

Outside Fla. 1-800-327-1917 



LAS VEGAS, Nevada 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

Pete. WA8PZA & Squeak. AD7K 

Outside Nev. 1-800-634-6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 
Outside ILL 1-800-621-5802 



73Magazine • April. 1982 87 










ELECTRONICS 

61 Lowell Rd., Hudson, N.H. 03051 

9-6 Daily (603) 883*5005 12 '5 Sunday 

LOWER and LOWER prices ! Thats what our catalog is bringing you 
this month. There have been numerous price reductions throughout. 
Our goal is to bring you the BEST PRODUCTS at the lowest possible 
prices, Our large inventory and the money saved by using such -tiny 
print are two of the reasons we can do this. Another is our new 
highly efficient MAIL ORDER HEADQUARTERS in HUDSON,NH. 
Most orders are shipped the same day they are received (Located just 
[30 minutes from Rte 12S in BOSTON via RTE 3 and only 45 minutes 
from LOGAN AIRPORT we're convenient to all of New England. You| 
don't have to be a Yankee to save money either, our phone service is 
second to none. NO SALES TAX in New Hampshire is another way 
we save you money ! Tufts is OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, our 
showroom hours are 9-6 Daily and 12-5 on Sunday. For the many 
who^avejsked aJ-^RGE TYPE CATALOG is now available for $1. 

DISCOUNTS- FREE CATALOG - EXPORTS- PACKAGES 



beflncAT 



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90 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



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73 Magazine * April, 1982 91 



CLOCKS & KITS 

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92 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



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vSee List of Advertisers on page 130 



73Magazme • April, 1982 93 



Flash and Crash 101 

how to weather the storm 



Dave MatteyKlNYK 
132 Lydall 
Manchester CT 06040 

Lightning is one of the 
most common occur- 
rences found in nature and 
certainly tends toward the 
spectacular. It is responsi- 
ble for starting about 
10,000 wilderness fires in 
this country each year and 
also infrequently causes 
deaths. Furthermore, there 
have been many miscon- 
ceptions and superstitions 
invented over the years. 

In spite of the losses that 
can be involved, the av- 
erage person knows very lit- 
tle about this phenomenon. 
It would seem that hams in 



particular have something 
of a vested interest in know- 
ing the facts so that the fate 
of their equipment will not 
be left completefy up to 
chance. This article will 
deal both with how light- 
ning occurs and the various 
protection methods that 
are available. 

A lot of information has 
been obtained since Ben 
Franklin first tried to elec- 
trocute himself with his ex- 
periments about 200 years 
ago. Meteorological obser- 
vations now have estab- 
lished thunderstorm activi- 
ty levels on a worldwide 
basis, Fig. 1 shows that the 
annual number of these 



storms varies from single- 
digit numbers up to as high 
as 200 in parts of South 
America. Interestingly, the 
maximum activity occurs 
over land masses that are 
located close to the equa- 
tor. This relationship to 
latitude mostly reflects in- 
creased evaporation and 
cloud formation in the hot- 
ter climates. 

Similar data has been 
generated for thunderstorm 
frequencies encountered 
across the United States 
South Florida has the dis- 
tinction of having the high- 
est annual activity — 100 
thunderstorm days. Fig, 2 
shows the thunderstorm ac- 




Fig. 1. Annual frequency of thunderstorm days. 

94 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



tivity throughout our coun- 
try and can be used as a par- 
tial guide for determining 
the typical frequency in 
your area, 

The information present- 
ed in Figs. 1 and 2 shows the 
number of days that thun- 
der was heard and does not 
tell whether a lightning 
flash goes to ground or is 
contained inside the cloud. 
Furthermore, the number of 
flashes to ground increases 
substantially with increas- 
ing distance away from the 
equator (Fig. 3). Severity of 
storms is not reflected by 
the data at all, (A more pre- 
cise method might involve 
recording thunderstorm 
duration instead of just oc- 
currence.) Consequently, 
these activity levels should 
be considered as relative in- 
formation rather than abso- 
lute values. 

The clouds that typically 
are responsible for thunder- 
storms and lightning are 
termed cumulonimbus 
These so-called "thun- 
derheads" are usually very 
large and reach overall 
heights of 35,000 feet. The 
temperature at the top of 
the cloud is a rather brisk 
-40° F. Such a cloud for- 
mation will spread out hor- 
izontally over several miles. 
Lest you think that lightning 
is produced only by thun- 
derstorms, you might be in- 
terested to know that sever- 




Fig. 2, Typical annual US frequency of thunderstorm days 
(Ret 1). 



al other possibilities exist as 
well. These include: sand- 
storms, snowstorms, and 
clouds located over erupt- 
ing volcanos (Reference 1). 
Lightning associated with 
snowstorms occurs often 
enough to be a concern to 
aircraft. Back on the 
ground, though, we will be 
interested in the common 
thunderstorms. 

Contrary to widespread 
belief, lightning does not 
come instantly crashing 
down to the Earth whenever 
Zeus is angry. In fact, it 
does not always come 
down, but occasionally can 
extend up to the cloud. 
These items are in the 
folklore that well try to set 
straight. Lightning actually 
consists of several stages. 
These are: the leader, initial 
return stroke, residual 
decay current and usually 
one or more restrikes (Ref- 
erence 2). The high-current 
portion occurs in about 
10-100 microseconds while 
the total cycle takes up to 
0.25 seconds. The rate of 
propagation is something 
less than the speed of light 
because of inductance and 
capacitance effects along 
the path. 

The source of energy that 
ultimately creates the dis- 
charge is presumed to be 
warm air rising toward the 
top of the cloud. The charg- 
ing process in the cloud is 
thought to happen as a re- 
sult of falling ice crystals. 
Portions of these crystals 
splinter off and become 
electrostatically charged. 
Wind currents then carry 



these positive charges up to 
the cloud's ceiling. The 
heavier remaining portions 
of the ice accumulate a 
negative charge at the bot- 
tom of the cloud. 

Other theories also exist, 
but their common denom- 
inator is that the cloud con- 
tains one or more localized 
"cells" where the lower part 
of the cell is negative, Local 
potential differences can 
reach many millions of 
volts inside the cells. Rela- 
tive to the Earth, the cell 
(cloud) has a net negative 
potential and a lifetime on 
the order of a half hour. 

As the cloud comes over- 
head, the ground under- 
neath it takes on a positive 
charge. Put more accurate- 
ly, negative ions in the 
ground are repelled from 
the area directly under the 
cloud formation. When a 
vertical conductor (flag- 
pole, tower, etc.) is present, 
an intense field concentra- 
tion occurs at its tip which 
can exceed the breakdown 
(dielectric) strength of the 
air; This causes micro- 
ampere "point-discharge" 
currents characterized by a 
bluish corona. Sailers used 
to call this corona St. 
Elmo's fire after a Mediter- 
ranean patron saint. Inci- 
dentally, this effect wilf 
cause severe local static. 
This is one reason why verti- 
cal antennas have a ball 
rather than a point at their 
tip. The ball's larger radius 
tends to reduce the possi- 
bility of corona discharges 
and their effects on recep- 
tion. 




25 



ao 



35 40 

DEGREES LATITUDE 



Fig, 3. Graph shows increasing probability of cloud-to- 
ground lightning strikes as distance from equator increases. 



Eventually, a column of 
ionized air called a pilot 
streamer reaches out from 
the cloud toward the 
ground. Afterwards, a more 
intense discharge takes 
place in the form of a series 
of incremental steps. This is 
referred to as the step-lead- 
er, This leader and its 
branches bring the negative 
cloud potential closer to 
the Earth — reduce the 
spark gap, if you will. 

Earlier, it was noted that 
leaders occasionally start 
from the ground and nearly 
reach up to the cloud. Fig. 4 
shows that fewer than 5% 
of the leaders associated 
with a 100-foot tower will 
behave like this. In all 
lightning discharges, how- 
ever, short streamers ex- 
tend upward from the ob- 
ject just before the dis- 
charge. This is the same 
phenomenon as St, Elmo's 
fire. When the two stream- 
ers connect they provide a 
highly conducting path 
(filament) which allows the 
charge in the tip of the 
leader to flow to the 
ground. 

As this current becomes 
higher, the filament imped- 
ance is reduced and more 
current flows. This reduces 
the charge at the leader's 
tip, allowing the conduct- 
ing arc to reach higher up 



into the filament channel. 
Consequently, this arc 
propagates up to the cloud 
and is called the return 
stroke. The speed of this 
return stroke is much faster 
than the step-leader that 
was "feeling" its way down 
to Earth. However, the 
overall speed of propaga- 
tion is only about one-third 
that of the speed of light 

Generally, people are not 
aware of this return stroke, 
However, this is what actu- 
ally produces the bright 
lightning flash as well as the 
thunder. The light involved 
is simply a result of the arc 
itself, while the high cur- 
rents result in rapid expan- 
sion of the surrounding air. 
This causes the thunder- 
clap, An old rule of thumb 
says that your distance 
from the spot where the 
lightning struck, measured 
in miles, is equal to the 
number of seconds be- 
tween the flash and the 
thunder. 

The currents flowing dur- 
ing the return stroke aver- 
age about 25,000 Amperes. 
Currents above 150k Amps 
have been recorded, but 
those over 80,000 Amps are 
rare. By comparison, the 
step-leader currents typi- 
cally are in the tens or hun- 
dreds of Amperes. The high- 
current values are mea- 
sured indirectly as you 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 95 



eo 



* 40 



s 



20 



DOWNWARD 
LEADERS 



UPWARD 
LEADERS 



L 



50 



100 190 

HEIGHT, FT 



300 



600 



1200 



Fig. 4. Percentage of upward leaders is slight without very 
tall structures. 



might imagine. Originally, 
small bundles of steel strips 
called magnetic links were 
placed perpendicularly 
near whatever was expect- 
ed to be hit. Any eventual 
lightning current would 
magnetize the links, and 
the amount and direction 
of the current flow could be 
deduced, Recently, similar 
methods have used mag- 
netic recording tape where 
the strike partially erases a 
pre-recorded signal of 
known strength. Again, the 
current would then be cal- 
culated. 

The final phase in the 
overall lightning process 
consists of a low-level con- 
tinuing current which pro- 
vides the opportunity for at 
least one more immediate 
restrike. This usually hap- 
pens about 200 millseconds 
(0.200 sec.) after the initial 
strike. This additional dis- 
charge invariably hits the 
same point on the Earth as 
its predecessors. This fact 
alone indicates that light™ 
ning can strike the same 
spot more than once. 

Several factors can in- 
crease the probability of a 
building, tower, or what- 
ever being struck. Geo- 
graphic effects were men- 
tioned earlier. Most of the 
others are not surprising. 
The type of terrain is impor- 
tant with the valleys being 
struck less often than high- 
er elevations. For a given 

96 73Magazine * April, 1982 



location, the possibilities in- 
crease as the square of the 
height of objects above 
ground. 

Grounding a tower will 
help reduce the amount of 
electrostatic charge pres- 
ent. This can help avoid a 
strike since the field 
strength at the top of the 
tower will be considerably 
lower, and upward stream- 
ers will find it that much 
harder to form. More im- 
portant, though, the good 
ground will allow the cur- 
rent to be safely discharged 
into the ground. 

Another factor is that the 
tower (or highest object) 
creates a so-called cone-of- 
protection which protects, 
other structures inside this 
cone. An example of this 
could be your house. The 
actual area protected is not 
well established, although a 
conservative figure seems 
to be that the radius of the 
cone is equal to the tower 
height (Fig. 5). 

There are quite a number 
of ways to increase the pro- 
tection of your equipment 
during a thunderstorm with- 
out going broke in the pro- 
cess. However, you should 
realize that there is no ab- 
solute protection short of 
tossing all transmission 
lines, rotor cables, etc, out 
of the window and unplug- 
ging the radio. (Even this 
assumes that you thought 
to take action well ahead of 




BOUNDARY OF 
PROTECTED AREA 



X 



^ 



x 



\ 



Fig. 5. Sketch showing principle of protective cone where 
the radius (R) at protective area (dotted) is equal to the 
tower height (H). 



the storm and were at home 
to do so. Do not disconnect 
these cables just before the 
storm or when it is in pro- 
gress,) Fortunately, there 
are some things that can be 
done that don't require you 
to be a recluse in the house. 

The first major step is to 
provide all of the station 
equipment with a good 
earth ground. This means 
that all equipment in the 
house should be attached 
(bonded) to an outside 
ground rod using as short a 
length of heavy wire as pos- 
sible. The standard rod is a 
0.5-inch copper bar driven 
eight feet into the ground. 
This provides a low-imped- 
ance path. Experiments 
have shown that larger 
diameters or greater depths 
do not provide better per- 
formance. These rods can 
be bought from local elec- 
trical supply houses. 

You should avoid cop- 
per-plated steel bars be- 
cause the plating will wear 
or corrode off leaving a rus- 
ty ground rod. There goes 
any low impedance! Simply 
check your ground rod to 
make sure it is not magnet- 
ic. If it is really necessary to 
ground to a water pipe in 
the house, use a cold water 
pipe since corrosion can 
break the electrical con- 
tinuity of the hot water 
ones. Also, check to see 
that the water meter has 
been bridged with a heavy 
wire. 



At least two of the tower 
legs should be attached to 
individual ground rods. 
These should be driven into 
the ground rather than 
through the concrete and 
into the ground. The same 
store that carries the rods 
usually also will stock brass 
clamps to secure the wires 
to the tower and the ground 
stakes. Remember to simi- 
larly treat any guy wires. 
Copper is best for the 
ground wires, but if alumi- 
num is used, it should be 
about a #2 size. Don't run 
aluminum through the con- 
crete since corrosion will 
ruin the wire in short order. 

The wires to each rod 
should be short and as di- 
rect as possible with no 
kinks or sharp bends. Light- 
ning does not want to turn 
corners! No ground wire 
should be placed through a 
metal conduit. This setup 
would act as an rf choke 
and encourage the light- 
ning to find an alternate 
route, If you are compelled 
to be neat, use porcelain or 
some other non-metallic 
material for the pass- 
through. 

Methods also are avail- 
able to reduce the risks of 
strikes to antennas. Again, 
bleeding off electrostatic- 
charge buildups caused by 
rain and snow is helpful. 
Some antennas such as 
ground-mounted verticals 
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73Magazine • Aprlf, 1982 97 



are already at ground po- 
tential and require no furth- 
er attention in this regard. If 
this is not the case and co- 
axial feedlines are used, a 
device such as Cushcraft's 
Blitz-Bug can be inserted in 
the coax near ground level 
where its case can be 
grounded. This device con- 
tains a built-in spark gap 
that will bleed off excess 
charges to ground. 

There are other tricks 
that can be used with coax, 
also. I made several one- 
foot diameter turns in the 
coax at the base of the 
tower. This took up excess 
cable lengths and also pro- 
vided an rf choke to help 
discourage the lightning 
from entering the house. A 
right-angle turn right after 
the choke arrangement per- 
forms similarly. Compared 
to your transceiver, the 
price of new coax is cheap! 

When the station is not 
being used, the antenna 
switch should be turned to 
its ground position. Since 
extended inactivity periods 
occur with vacations, etc., 
it is convenient to home- 
brew a coax grounding box 
which is mounted to the 
tower or to a ground stake. 
Such a device is shown in 
Fig. 6. 

An outdoor utility box 
with a hinged or removable 
cover and a good weather 
tight seal forms the basis of 
the unit. Three male-male 
coaxial feedthrough con- 
nectors (UG363) are needed 
for each coaxial ly-fed an- 
tenna, Inside the box there 
is a short length of coax 
with PL-259 connectors at- 
tached to each end One of 
the groups of three feed- 
though (bulkhead) connec- 
tors is located in the bot- 
tom of the box and its cen- 
ter conductor is grounded 

During normal use, a 
patch cord is connected di- 
rectly from the antenna to 
the coax running to the ra- 
dio. However, before the 
vacation, this patch cord is 
changed over to the 
grounded connector. This 

98 73Magazine • April, 1982 



COAX TO ANT I 



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Fig. 6. SJt etch showing grounding box configuration tor coaxial ly-fed antennas. 



grounds the antenna direct- 
ly and essentially elimi- 
nates the chance of a direct 
hit from entering the house 
via the coax lines Remem- 
ber to be sure to seal the 
holes around each connec- 
tor mounted on the box. Sili- 
cone rubber, RV, or other 
compounds can be used ef- 
fectively for this purpose. It 
is a good idea to drill one or 
two small holes (1/16-1/8 
inch) in the bottom of the 
box to allow for condensate 
drainage. 

If your station uses an 
open-wire transmission line. 
the above suggestions are 

not appropriate without 
some modification, How- 
ever, this situation was cov- 
ered long before we started 
using coax. The time- 
proven method of protect- 
ing gear in this case is to use 
an air gap (Fig. 7), The gap 
distance is chosen to be too 
large for the signal to bridge 
but small enough to allow 
lightning to jump across it 
and continue on to ground. 
Various handbooks deal 
with these air gaps in detail, 
and various things includ- 
ing spark plugs have been 
used. 

In the potpourri depart- 



ment, a comment or two 
come to mind regarding 
roof-mounted VHF/UHF an- 
tennas and even the TV 
ones as well. Most people 
are aware that the mast that 
supports these antennas 
should be grounded. A typi- 
cal installation involves 
bringing the transmission 
line, rotor cable, and the 
ground wire down the side 
of the house in a neat paral- 
lel manner, Electrically, 
though, it is not so pleasing. 
In the event of an actual 
strike, the lightning has a 
choice of paths to ground. 



Side flashes from the 
ground wire to one of the 
other cables is also possi- 
ble. This problem can be 
overcome by making sure 
that the ground wire is the 
shortest and placing the 
other wires away from it 
Again, we see the rule of 
thumb regarding short, di- 
rect ground wires coming 
into play. 

One should realize that 
damage to electronic 
equipment does not neces- 
sarily require a direct light- 
ning strike. Relatively large 
voltages (spikes) can be in- 



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73 Magazine * April, 1982 99 



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duced into the ac distribu- 
tion system when a neigh- 
borhood utility pole is hit 
The voltage transients pro- 
duced can travel into 
equipment via the house 
wiring. An obvious solution 
is to pull the plug, but this is 
not always convenient and 
can be forgotten. Protec- 
tion against these spikes is 
especially important with 
solid-state rigs since they 
do not have the overvott- 
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tube predecessors, Fortu- 
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can be attached to essen- 
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A Closing Note 

Well, there you have the 

basics of how lightning de- 
velops and what can be 
done to minimize its occur- 
rence and effects. Total 
protection cannot be en- 
sured unless each piece of 
equipment is isolated from 
the antenna and the ac 
mains. Unfortunately, this 
is not always possible. How- 
ever, the techniques pre- 
sented in this article are 
simple to apply and will 
provide a significant mea- 
sure of protection for your 
equipment.! 

References 

1. Lightning Protection of Air- 
craft. NASA publication T008. 
F.A. Fisher and J. A. Plumer, 
1977. 

2. Lightning Protection. R.H. 
Goide, Chemical Publishing. 
1973, pp. 9-23. 



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73 Magazine • April, 1982 101 



Stormy Weather 

to be forewarned is to be forearmed 



&2f* T 



♦UNREGULATED OCv 



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CHARGER 
PC BOARD 



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20VAC 
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TQKE ALE«T 

TEST 



TEST ft 

LINE FAULT 
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LINE VOLT 

FAILURE 

WARNING 



61 a B2 GEL -CELLS 
6V EACH 4 34 h 



Fig. 7. Power pact; ac operation, dc battery and charging, and the automatic switching be- 
tween ac and dc. 

102 73 Magazine • April, 1962 



David I. Brown W9CCI 

RR 5, Box 39 

Nob few if te IN 46060 



You say the storm just 
turned your yard and 
basement into Lake Michi- 
gan? The swing set just 
tipped over into your pic- 
ture window, and the St 
Bernard got blown halfway 
through the fence — what's 
left of it? Is there something 
going 'round and 'round 
and marching down your 
street with your nice new 
car bouncing along on its 
top? Is that what's troubling 
you, Bunky? 

The heavens truly opened 
up and delivered their 
wrath, but at least you and 
the family all made it 
through in one piece! Or 
maybe you have seen it 
happen to others, and it just 
came too close to you for 
comfort Well, then, have I 
got something for you! No 
longer do you have to keep 
one eye on the sky, one foot 
in the basement one hand 
on the most valuable thing 
you own, an ear screwed in- 
to the radio, and then still 
try to work and go around 
and about your business in 
that position. That is like 
the old shoulder to the 



wheel, eye on the ball, etc., 
and-try-to-work-in-t hat-posi- 
tion joke. Why not let a 
very special monitor do the 
worry and watching, cour- 
tesy of the National Weath- 
er Service VHF radio broad- 
casts? 

Should the "very special'' 
comment lead you to be- 
lieve my idea is also quite 
expensive like the special 
receivers used in schools 
for weather warnings, don't 
let it! It is just not true. The 
"special" refers to the 
dedicated and reliable job 
my unit does and some of 
the easy and inexpensive 
ways to accomplish really 
fantastic results. 



The Source of Warning 

The National Weather 
Service operates a weather- 
warning system of VHF sta- 
tions throughout the coun- 
try. They are located in 
nearly every major-size 
city, near any sizable body 
of water, and in some 
remote places you would 
never believe, A phone call 
to your local radio/TV sta- 
tion, a note to the National 
Weather Service (NWS), or 
punching up their frequen- 
cy on a monitor will tell you 
quickly if one is nearby 
enough for you to use it 
The frequencies in use are 
162,400, 162.475, and 
162.550 MHz, one frequen- 
cy to any given area. 

Our station in the India- 
napolis area is on 162.550 
MHz and serves a much 
wider territory of central In- 
diana than I think even 
NWS planned on. The trans- 
missions are narrowband 
FM {approximately 5 to 7 
kHz audio) and easily pro- 
grammed into most of the 
available monitor/scanners. 

A word about scanners, 
though. I have had Indy 
NWS programmed into my 
Bearcat 250 scanner since I 
first learned of it. I live on a 
farm, out in the open, and 
am, in a word, vulnerable! 
However, if you want the 



scanner to still scan, you 
must lock out the NWS 
channel except when you 
want to listen to it. Unfor- 
tunately, with it locked out, 
you may miss a weather 
alerfwaming call when you 
need it most. You could be 
asleep, scanning 2m or the 
police, etc. I am not knock- 
ing a scanner or monitor for 
occasional NWS channel 
use, but to tie one up on it 
for serious warning and 
safety use is an expensive 
and silly approach. 

Storms come up far too 
fast in the southwest and 
midwest unlike, say, a hur- 
ricane approaching Florida 
or Texas. There were days 
of warning on recent hurri- 
canes. In the midwest, 
when two air masses get to- 
gether, we often get some 
hair-raising minutes of a tor- 
nado warning. 

Solutions — Save Our 
Souls (, , . . , ,) 

There are, fortunately, 
several answers to the prob- 
lem. Proper equipment 
choice, the way NWS han- 
dles real alert conditions, 
and what you may already 
have on hand or be able to 
get cheap are al I that I want 
to tie together in this arti- 
cle. 

First the service was not 
chosen in the 162-MHz 
region arbitrarily. It was 
originally a marine weather 
service and that fits the fre- 
quency range of most of the 
marine VHF radios nicely. 
To be useful, it is a 24- 
hou rs-a-day, 7-days-a-week 
continuous broadcast of 
weather and related infor- 
mation to serve those ma- 
rine commercial and pri- 
vate boat owner/operators. 

Downtime is for fixing a 
failure or preventative 
maintenance only, and 
most stations, if not all by 
now, have back-up gear to 
cover those times when the 
main transmitter is off the 
air. There is no receiving on 
those frequencies by NWS, 




Fig. 2, PC board layout for power source. 



and please do not transmit 
anything there! When a real 
danger exists in the station's 
area or approaching it such 
as severe storms or a tor- 
nado watch or warning, the 
NWS station comes on with 
a live broadcast immediate- 

ly. 

These "alert" broadcasts 
are preceded by 15 to 20 
seconds of continuous 
1050-Hz audio tone. That is 
the trick to making my re- 
ceiver idea work, without 
going insane listening to the 
all-day and all-night-long 
broadcasts. They are loop- 
taped, about 1 minute long, 
and updated about once 
per hour or as needed. Over 
and over, and believe me, it 
goes on, and on, and on! 
You could become an NWS 
announcer word-for-word 
after about 10 passes of 
that same information, 

Since they use that 
1050- Hz tone before every 
live broadcast of an 



"alert/warning" nature, I 
decided to detect it, open a 
receiver's audio and find 
out what al I the commotion 
was about, and still not turn 
into a babbling idiot! So 
can you, and very inexpen- 
sively these days. I have 
shown and will explain in 
detail several ways to go 
about doing this from sever- 
al different approaches. 
Then you can have your 
very own protection and en- 
joy a valuable and free ser- 
vice. This is not like snitch- 
ing the HBO or cable ser- 
vices. NWS wants you to 
use this service. You could 
end up saving property 
damage to yourself and 
others, lessen personal in- 
juries caused by these 
storms, and quite realisti- 
cally protect life it- 
self—and it could be your 
own. An ounce of preven- 
tion—a minute of warn- 
ing—same story! 

Power Sources 

I have outlined a way to 
73 Magazine * April, 1982 103 



TURN Oft J OFF Stf BAR Oft 

SET VOLUME 

FOR RELIABLE 

TONE ALERT FUNCTION 



RADIO SHACK 

273-004 

6- IZV 30OSI COIL 



TONE DECODER 
FtC I 




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s« to®. 

TOHE AcERT 

3* TO® ± 

RADIO AUftO 
OH 



PROW 
fj% PQWE.R SUPPLY 



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ORIGINAL COSE" 
SPEAKEA 



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CHECK 
FOfl 9V 



RADIO SHACK 

REALISTIC 

I2-I37A 



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tPLLia OPENS l«T SPEAKER I 



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SPEAKER 



SCANNER 
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CHANNEL 



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EXTERNAL 

SPAR xSAME AS 

JACK _J— Tf|C I 



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FEATURES 



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EKTEfll*AL SPEAKER 
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AUDfO **«» 



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ANY Hi -2 
AUOiO OUT 

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FOR THE 

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SPEAKER 



TUNER OR OTHER VMF BOARDS 
WITH Hl-i OUT AND NO 
AUDIO AMP 



Fig. 3. Configurations: What can be put into service, uses, facts, and ideas. Configuration 1: 
Low-Z (speaker) radio audio, tone-alert feature, and power line failure feature. Configura- 
tion 2: Low-Z (speaker) radio audio, tone-alert built into radio, and power line failure 
feature. Configuration 3: Scanner use, e.g., Bearcat 101 or 250. Configuration 4: Tuner or 
other VHF boards with high-Z out and no audio amp. Configuration 5: Can be used like con- 
figurations 1 or 3 with 2m FM rig to monitor for tone calls only. Configuration 6: Same as 5, 
only WWV Time-cube and the tones given on the hour/half-hour/minute for contest or 
schedule operations. Configuration 7: Same as 5, with converted CB radio on 10m for local 
net or rag-chew call-up or messages. Configuration 8: Same as 5, with unconverted CB and 
emergency call-up, e.g., REACT, WTHR, disaster, 



be warned of danger, but 
the danger is storms and 
with that goes wind r hail, 
ice, snow, tornadoes — and 
sooner or later loss of 
power from the ac mains. If 
lightning knocks a pole 
down up the road and your 
power goes off at the lead- 
ing edge of the storm, and 
then the tornado comes 
dancing up to your door- 
step, the alert monitor is 
not going to warn anybody 
with the juice off! 

104 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



Any really useful monitor 
must have a standby power 
source and switch to it au- 
tomatically. It should use 
rechargeable, rugged, 
sealed batteries like those I 
have shown as Gel/Cells in 
Fig. 1 , B1 and B2. This figure 
describes my power system 
and the switching needed, I 
admittedly overkilled when 
it came to the Amp-hour 
rating and capacity of the 
batteries I used I wanted to 
be sure if the power went 



off in the early evening, 
without having to forever 

eagle-eye the monitor, it 
would continue running on 
batteries— for days if need 
be. Further, a 12-volt jack 
on the back connected 
across (x) and (z) allows me 
to run the Bearcat 250 on 1 2 
V dc all the time, by using 
the Bearcat mobile power 
input connection. In a real 
bind, I can even plug in my 
HW-202 2m FM rig with rub- 
ber ducky for full 2m opera- 



tion. Note; The regulator 
supplying point (x) will not 
supply the Heathkit 2-Am- 
pere transmit load when the 
power source is operational 
in ac mode, but then I have 
a Heathkit ac power pack 
for that I am referring to 
real emergency conditions 
and battery operation only. 
The source in ac mode 
(point x) will supply 1 Am- 
pere maximum. 

In order to get the proj- 
ect into use as quickly as 
possible, I have "borrowed" 
heavily on others' designs 
that I knew worked. I have 
added a PC board if they 
did not, modified some cir- 
cuits to do my bidding in- 
stead of the original 
author's, and created a 
lash-up that works and 
works well. I will try to cred- 
it the original authors and 
sources as I come to them, 
and I will point out my 
changes. 

For opening credits, the 
battery charger complete 
with a very nice floating 
charge system for always 
live batteries is courtesy of 
Don Johnson WB6MXD via 
73 Magazine, August, 1980. 
I have had my alert monitor 
system for some time now, 
but the change to Don's 
system with float feature 
has really added dimension 
to it It made good sense 
and worked right off, but it 
had no PC board. I added 
that as a plug-in or wire-in 
PC board and it is Fig. 2. 

The batteries, as I said, 
are much more capable 
than the monitor requires. 
There is another good 
reason for staying with all 
that "grunt" capability, and 
that is that the batteries are 
readily available in the 
form of the replacement 
batteries for portable TV 
sets. One such source is 
RCA dealers or their Parts 
and Accessories Depart- 
ment (RCA part number 
1437888-501 -one 6-volt 
pack, Le., B1 or B2). 12 volts 
requires two of these packs. 



r — 1 

I COPY RTTY, ASCII 

1 and Morse 
from the palm 
of your hand. 



i 
i 
i 

L 



^^^p 




^^■■B 


Ji 




m f « r r 










WirtTWlO <PH •■«■ 1 




99 A,^J fl 1 



Have you waited to get into 

code reading until you found 
out what this latest fad was 
about? You can stop waiting, 
because it's no longer a fad 

Amateurs everywhere 
are tossing the gigantic 
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year that once performed 
the job of reading 
radioteietype. They are trad* 
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art code-reading devices 
that are incredibly small, 
noiseless if desired and in- 
finitely more versatile than 
their antique predecessors. 

Kantronics, the leader in 
code-reading development, 
has just introduced the latest 
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Morse code, radioteietype 
and ASCII computer langu- 
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The Kantronics Mini- 
Reader reads all three types 
of code, displays code speed, 
keeps a 24-nour clock, acts as 
a radioteietype demodulator 
and reads all of its decoded 
information out on a travel- 
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characters, it is so compact 
that it fits in a hand-held, 
calculator-size enclosure. 

At $269.95, the Mini-Read- 
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within another S400 of its 
price range. 

Call or visit your Authoriz- 
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find out what the latest in 
technology has done to 
code-reading. 



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Independent Military Option 

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Exercise your independent military option now. 



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See Lift ot Advertisers an page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 105 







Gainqiq 



520 

SEE PJG 2 

RA St TE*T 

=™^rtAr— ' 



2mF 



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30 *v 
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VOLUME 

CONTROL 



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50V 



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15V 






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Kg) 

Fig. 4. Audio amplifiers: Using the total unit with tuners that 
have high-Z audio available and/or no audio output stagefsj 
to boost audio level for speaker. 



It is a plastic package con- 
taining 3 cells, has leads of 
about 6" coming out with a 
rather standard molex™ 
2-pin connector termina- 
tion (male plugs, female 
pins), and the leads are long 
enough to change to any 
connector of your choice. 
For information sake, they 
are made by Gates Battery 
so their brand name 6 V @ 
4.5 Ah will do fine also The 

Globe-Union #1245 also is 
the same. 

Control and Switching 

Fig, 1 shows all the 
switching to automatically 
drop the monitor to battery 
upon an ac line failure, 
sound a 1050-Hz tone and 
bring up the NWS audio if 
desired, and even automati- 
cally switch back to the ac 
mains when power has been 
restored, At that time the 
batteries begin recharging, 
and when back up to full 
charge, switch to the float- 
ing charge state to maintain 
full capacity for the next 
downtime failure. 

LED indicators keep you 
constantly aware of status, 
so I recommend you mount 
them on the front panel 
with the speaker and vol- 
ume control, The NWS- 
ON/AIert position switch 
can go there or on the rear 



panel, as you choose. After 
the tone brings up receiver 
audio for a fixed period, to 
go on listening, that switch 
must be changed from the 
normal alert monitor posi- 
tion to NWS, so act accord- 



raw oc - 

JUMPER 



LIMIT LED CATHODE 



BATT 

— - ^ 



®\ 



FLOAT LEO CATHODE 

NC~ 
NC- 
NC- 

CHARGE LED CATHODE 

LIMIT LED ANODE 

CHARGE LED ANODE 

FLOAT LED ANODE 

+ REG OUT BATT © 

NC- 

J AC-* 

20 VAC f NC- 
S AC-* 

NC- 
RAW DC + 



ingly with your layout My 
LED recommendations are: 
red for II to show limit cur- 
rent, yellow or amber for 12 
to show normal charging, 
green for 13 to show the 
float/standby condition, 
and whatever fourth color 
you can come up with for 
the remaining 14 to show 
that the monitor is on and in 
the ac mode. 

All circuits (LED, relay, 
audio, etc) are arranged to 
allow minimum current 

drain in the battery service 
mode, i.e., all LEDs are off, 
relay K1 is de-energized, 
and audio is off until alert 
tone is received unless in 
NWS position. I have 
changed very little of Fig. 1 
from Don's original except 
the added 12-Vdc regulator 
as an ac-mode power 
source and switching relay 
K1 If you do not want the 
tone warning on ac failure 
but only for the radio to go 
on quietly monitoring NWS 



on battery power, K1 can be 
just a DPDT relay with a 
12-V dc coil, no K1c con- 
tacts, and K1 a and K1 b con- 
tacts rated at 1 Ampere. S2 
(warning on/off) can then be 
eliminated. I would advise 
you to wire it in and just put 
it to "off"; adding it costs so 
little. You won't know how 
useful it is until you have 
tried it for awhile. In any 
case, keep the alert test 
switch, S3, as you still want 
to be able to test the tone- 
alert system from time to 
time with an internal 
1050-Hz tone. 20 seconds or 
so on S3 should open up re- 
ceiver audio, whether the 
NWS carrier is present or 
not 

Automation — The 
Tone Decoder 

This circuit is also bor- 
rowed, though modified, 
and belongs to Robert 
Lloyd, from Popular Elec- 
tronics, May. 1976 (I read 
'em alll). The original cir- 




Fig. 5. Component location for power supply board. 



106 73Magazine • April, 1982 




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73 Magazine * April, 1982 107 




Fig. 6. PC board layout for tone decoder/tone oscillator. 



W9CGI MODIFICATION 



TS-l 




R5 ROBT W LLOYD C1RCUJT 

33QK S EE TEXT ABOUT *RA, RB, RC, CA 



103-4001 CMOS 



F/g. 7. lone decoder and latch: Detecting the National Weather Service alert tone and 
holding audio on for a fixed period. 



SEE F(G. i 



1050 - 
SQ. WAVE 



*500 (j\ 




CIS 
.47 
30V 



SEE FIG. I 



F/g. 8. Tone oscillator: Testing the tone alert and tone 
source for alerting the user of an ac failure. 



cuit ran a 567 IC as the tone 
decoder, a 555 IC as an anti- 
falsing device to keep voice 
in the 1050-Hz range from 
triggering the monitor au- 
dio on r and V4 of a CMOS 
4001 gate to identify the le- 
gitimate over-1 5-second 
tone by gating the tone de- 



code output (low) and the 
555 output (returning to 
low) to form a high output. 
Mine is the same up to this 
point, except Ra is shown as 
an {*), For the Weather- 
cube™ used with Lloyd's 
original circuit (Fig. 3, Con- 
figuration 1), Ra is 10 Ohms. 



You will see more in the rest 
of the configurations for Ra 
values, but in general, Ra 
should be equal to the ra- 
dio's speaker impedance or 
close to it Usually from 10 
to 47 Ohms works just fine, 
but try to match speaker Z, 
If Fig. 4 is used in any con- 
figuration, then Ra should 
be 600 to 620 Ohms to 
match the tone preamp's 
output impedance. There 
was no PC layout with the 
original on this one either, 
so I have included mine as 
Fig, 6. Fig. 6 also has the 
tone oscillator on it, since 
one feeds the other any- 
way, and that makes one 
less wire for you to hook up. 

The modifications did 
not come about from 
Lloyd's circuit not work- 
ing— itdoes. I simplycould 



not locate quickly enough 
the HEP 320 SCR he used to 
latch things on after the 
tone is decoded. My substi- 
tutes were not reliable 
enough, and while mum- 
bling something about lo- 
cal parts suppliers' rela- 
tionships to the old 44eg- 
ged Army pack transporta- 
tion, I decided I needed one 
more feature not provided 
for in his original circuit 
Even had I gotten every- 
thing working up to here, I 
had overlooked one small 
detail in the NWS signal for- 
mat and schedule. 

Remember, I wanted 
total hands-off operation 
until the real tone alert 
brought things up. Weil, as 
an added service to the 
schools and other NWS us- 
ers, NWS also sends out a 
test tone callup every morn- 
ing around 10 or 11 o'clock! 
That meant my perfect sys- 
tem would come on every 
morning and "serenade" 
my wife for 8 solid hours 
until I got home around 6 
prtL You know by now, that 
even if she unplugged it, it 
would harp on and on. 
Since I don't wear a hat, my 
head goes in the door first, 
and I have grown rather 
fond of it staying attached 
to the rest of my body. 
'Nuff said! 



Building It My Way 

Instead of the SCR to 
latch the system on, I have 
used another 555 IC set for 
about 2 minutes, l used 
another of the 3/4-unused 
gates in the 4001 to invert 
the original high-going SCR 
turn-on pulse to a low-going 
555 trigger pulse. Now the 
monitor comes on for 
about 2 minutes. If any- 
thing interesting is going on, 
I can throw the switch from 
alert to NWS-ON and listen 
for any period of time, 
returning it to alert when I 
have finished, This way, 
even the test alerts only 
bring the monitor on for 2 
minutes, and that I deemed 
tolerable. My head was safe 
again! 



108 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



As for the further "see 
text" items indicated by *, 
Re can be from 10k to 1M 
and still trigger the 555 and 
not injure the trigger input- 
It is a safety device to pro- 
tect the 555 trigger input 
from attaching directly to 
the +V rail when high, as 
the CMOS 4001 device 
would allow it to do. Keep 
going up to 1M (or it quits 
triggering), cut that value in 
half, and you should be in 
fine shape from both safety 
and reliability standpoints, 

Ca can be about the origi- 
nal 0.1 uF/30 V, and Rb 
should start at the original 
470 point Rb and Ca filter 
out the little glitch that oc- 
curs when the 567 tone 
decoder output goes low on 
tone, That low causes the 
555 anti-falsing device out- 
put to go high, but not im- 
mediately. That instant that 
the 567 and 555 outputs are 
both low would make gate 
1 output high, gate 2 output 
(inverter) low, and falsely 
trigger the last latch 555 
on — a no-no. As long as the 
filter is big enough to stop 
that false triggering and not 
exceed the total normal 
tone duration, it will do< It is 
not critical, so try what you 
have. 

Testing— The Tone- 
Oscillator Function 

The tone oscillator is also 
borrowed, straight from a 
National Semiconductor 
Data Manual, June, 1973, 
for a 566 tone-oscillator IC 
The PC layout is mine and is 
just added onto the input 
end of the decoder board, 
Fig, 6, as that's where its 
output goes, anyway, It is 
turned on by turning the 
voltage on and off, either 
by manual test by pushing 
the switch (Tone Alert Test, 
S3, Fig. 1), or by the K1c 
relay contact to alert you of 
an ac line failure. The 
switch, S2, between K1c 
and the tone oscillator 
merely lets you include the 
loss-of-mains feature, but 
not always use it if you so 



RF 



IT \ T T ^T 



CI4 





RC 



RO 



CB 



IC4 



DA 



T* 



€C 




RV 

R 

RG 



R 

Z 




Fig. 10. PC board layout for audio interface. 



SPKR 



out 



* z 

S3/KIC X Z 

Fig. 9. Component location for tone decoder/tone oscillator board. 



desire. Don't let the voltage 
on/off control of the oscilla- 
tor scare you. Under normal 
circumstances it is not good 
practice, but it allows 
easier control switching 
here. The monitor tone de- 
coder needs 15 or so sec- 
onds to respond, and the 
oscillator will settle down 
to its 1050-Hz output in 
much less than that, 

Interface — Making 
What You Have Work 

Fig. 4 is a 2-channel audio 
circuit and Fig. 6 is a PC 
layout for same. It too is 
"borrowed" from a friend 
at work, but it is pretty 
much two data-book cir- 
cuits on a single PC board, 
The original intent was to 
build up the audio from a 
High-Z source, like a one-IC 
FM demodulator. One 
channel (the 741 C) builds it 
up from 50 mV to 500 mV 
with a 600-Ohm impedance 
to drive a modulator like 
that used in a video tape or 
games unit. The second 
channel (LM380) builds the 
power level up to 2 to 3 
Watts to drive a speaker. It 
was ideal for my purpose, 
and by a minor PC board 
change to divide the +12-V 
dc feedpoint into two 
points, it is perfect. The 
+ 12 V dc must go from 
power source (x) to the (x) 
of the audio board directly, 
so the tone amp is always 
on and working (741 C). To 
silence the audio output 
without having to resort to 
things like breaking the pos- 
hi lead of the speaker with a 
relay (see Fig, 3, Configura- 
tion 1, relay K2), the +12 V 




6.2 



Fig. 11. Component location for audio interface board. 



dc to the audio amp (380) is 
broken instead. This is done 
by connecting power source 
(x) to audio board (R). lust 
when and how this is done 
is covered in the Configura- 
tions section and Fig. 3; 

Configurations — 
Endless Ideas 

Obviously, there are 
many ways to attack the 
problem once past the 
highly recommended Fig, 1 
power source. The first step 
is what you are going to use 
to get the VHF down to 



audio— the monitor radio 
part. I have a few tips on 
that part that can save 
bucks. 

First, don't overlook 
where you are and where 
the station is. A nearby sta- 
tion does not take a $300 
receiver sensitivity to hear 
it. Even if you are a bit out 
from the station, don't over- 
look using "cropped-down" 
channel 2 through 6 VHF 
TV antennas of the dis- 
count store variety or a 
cropped-down broadcast 
FM or even 2m antenna. 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 109 






ALIGNMENT and ADJUSTMENT 

the power supply in Fig. 1. With no battery attached, 
adjust R2 for the floating voltage of 13,5 Vdc (2.25 voits/cell x 
6 cells = 13,5 volts}. Next, adjust the full-charge voltage by 
jumpering point A to the emitter of Q3 and adjusting R3 for an 
output voltage of 14.4 V dc (2,4 volts/cell x 6 cells = 14.4 V, 

The current limit control, R 4, is a little more difficult to set. I 
set the control to full counterclockwise, then connected the 
battery, with an ammeter in series with the battery, to the 
charger A partially discharged Gel/Cell will draw in excess of 
the maximum allowable charge current from an unregulated 
supply, so all you need to do is turn the limit control until the 
meter indicates 700 mA, 

The charger is ready for service. Connect the Gel/Cell and 
watch the lights. The yellow LED Indicates the battery is 
charging, if the red LED also is on, you know that the charger 
is limiting and you can expect the terminal voltage to be 
below 14.4 volts. As the fully-charged condition nears, the red 
LED will go out and the voltage will reach 14.4 volts. When full 
charge is reached (charge current below 100 mA), the yellow 
LED will go out as the green one comes on. 

No alignment or adjustment is required for the audio inter- 
face in Fig. 4 beyond setting the user (panel-mounted) volume 
control for the volume level you want. 

See Fig. 7, the tone decoder. For testing, start with the IGs 
out and the circuit not connected to the receiver 

Install ICt in its socket and connect a dc voltmeter between 
pin 8 and ground (positive side to pin 8) + Turn on the dc power 
and note that the voltmeter indicates close to the supply volt^ 
age. Connect an audio signal generator ground to the circuit 
ground and the hot side to the W terminal of TSt With the 
relay de-energized, IC1s input should now have a signal. 

Set the signal generator as close as possible to 1050 Hz. 
Adjust R2 until the voltmeter reading drops to near zero, in- 
dicating that IG1 is decoding. Remove the signal generator 
and the voltmeter should go back to the supply voltage 
reading. Perform this step several times to make sure that ICt 
is operating with each application of 1050 Hz. Turn off the 
audio generator and the dc power. 

Remove tC1 from its socket and install IC2 in its socket. 
Connect the dc voltmeter between pin 3 of IC2 and ground. 
Turn on the dc power. Connect a jumper to circuit ground and 
touch the other end to pin 2 of IC2. Note that the voltmeter 
reading is the supply voltage. After about 10 seconds, the volt- 
meter should drop back to near zero, indicating that i€2 has 
timed out. It the timing is too short, increase the value of R5. 
Conversely, if it is too long, reduce the value of R5. Check the 
timing cycle several times to make sure it is in a range of 7 to 
14 seconds. Turn off the power supply and remove the jumper. 

Remove IG2 from rts socket and install IC3 in its socket. 
Connect one end of a jumper to circuit ground and the other 
end to pins 1 and 2 of fC3 simultaneously. Relay K1 should 
close and lock in, Wait for 14 time-out, and note that the relay 
opens. Repeat this operation, ending with the relay closed. 
Remove the jumper and connect it between the supply and 
either pin 1 or 2 of IC3^ Remove the jumper and the dc supply, 

Once all tests have been made,, install all of the ICs. Apply 
the dc supply and put the 1050-Hz signal from the audio 
generator on the input. After IC2 has timed out, the relay 
should close. Remove the signal input, depress S1. and the 
relay should open and remain open. The circuit is now ready 
for installation. Note: The tone oscillator if built and frequen- 
cy-checked for 1050 Hz can be used as an audio generator. 

The tone oscillator in Fig, 8 requires only one adjustment to 
align the frequency adjustment pot for a 1050-Hz output at TP 
(square wave) or W (triangle wave). Adjust Rt for 50 to 60 mV 
p-p signal at W, or wait and adjust Rl for consistent tone-alert 
operation when the decoder is finished and aligned (see Fig. 7 
alignment and adjustment information). 



They will be fixed-mounted 
and can even be in the attic 
if you are not in an alumi- 
num-siding-covered house. 

The station won't move on 
you, I promise, so there's no 
fuss with rotors. Even the 
"cheapie" monitor radio 
sounds fine on a good out- 
side antenna instead of its 
telescoping delight but try 
the whip first— it's free with 
the radio and might amaze 
you. 

As an example, on the 
Weather-cube from Radio 
Shack that I had and tried 
first, indoors and on the 
whip it sounded OK, but 
some days it was noisy and 
some days my tone feature 
was marginal. That you 
don't ever want, so just for 
kicks I lashed it up to my 
11-element 2m antenna- 
unmodified— and the dif- 
ference was astounding no 
matter where the antenna 
was pointed! Not only per- 
fect local copy, but the 
same on another channel 
from Chicago 250+ miles 
away. I merely took a 
panel-mount screw-in type 
UHF connector to match 
the plug on my 2m lead-in 
with RG-8, soldered a piece 
of #22 insulated wire to the 
center pin, wrapped 8 turns 
(arbitrary) around the base 
of the collapsed whip (top 
of radio), and then soldered 
the remaining end to the 
ground side of the UHF 
female. Connect the male 
from the antenna and 
votla — signal Nothing fan- 
cy, nothing resonant, per- 
fect copy. Proves if you got 
it— try it. 

In all the configurations I 
show in Fig- 3, 1 run the 
radio off the power source 
of Fig. 1 . In some, that takes 
a dropping resistor in the + 
lead to the radio to drop the 
power source +12 V dc 
down to the required radio 
voltage. Most pocket and 
portable radios of this 
weather type run off a 
+ 9-V dc transistor radio 
battery. The resistor will be 
Ohms = 3 volts divided by 
the radio current in Amps. 



Wattage of the resistor is 3 
volts times the radio cur- 
rent in Amps. Simple Ohm's 
law. Why, even the appli- 
ance operators should not 
fear this project 

I have shown some vari- 
ous configurations I have 
tried and listed some possi- 
ble uses using these lash- 
ups. The possibilities are as 
endless as your imagination 
and time. The examples are 
specific, but let me gener- 
alize a bit 

Configuration 1 —This 
was the original idea: any 
low-Z speaker output 
below about 3 Watts, a 
radio needing about 1/2 
Amp or less of +12 V dc or 
less, and you're in! 

Configuration 2 — For 

radios that already have a 
tone-alert feature, but you 
still tike the standby battery 
idea 

Configuration 3 — Use 
the idea with a scanner or 
monitor and decode only 
net or special calls to be 
tone type (RTTY?). 

Configuration 4 — Use a 
retuned FM tuner, hamfest 
salvage monitor boards, or 
1-to-4-crystal older monitor 
boards. Buy one crys- 
tal—be weather safe! I 
have seen several of these 
older monitor boards show- 
ing up around the hamfests 
(Dayton and Indy so far) for 
$10 or less. 

Configuration 5 — Same 
as idea 3 using monitor or 
scanner- 
Configuration 6 — Use 
the time tones of WWV 
with an inexpensive Time- 
cubeTM f rom Radio Shack. 
Retune the decoder board 
to work on the WWV tones 
you want. Use for contests, 
10-minute reminder, etc. 

Configuration 7 — Use 
the idea with a converted 
11m CB-radio board from 
one of the flyers (Olson) for 
use as a local net or rag* 
chew call-up on 10m. The 
audio outputs are usually 
missing off these (use Fig. 
4), and the transmitter you 
don't care about for a 
monitor! 



110 73 Magazine • April, 1982 




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73Magaztne • April, 1982 111 






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Configuration 8 — Similar 
to 7, only unconverted CB 
to monitor CB for REACT 
channel 9, weather, emer- 
gencies. 

Configuration 9—1 did 
not show a Configuration 9, 
but don't over look the 
possibilities in any of the 
configurations of added 
poles on the relays if need- 
ed to switch in a tape re- 
corder on those tone call- 
ups to record a message 
while you are out. You get a 
tone call and the caller 
leaves a message— a nice 
feature! The recorder can 
run off the power source 
just like the radio with an 
appropriate dropping resis- 
tor. 



Summary 

For the time and money 
involved, I doubt you could 
spend a more rewarding 
weekend of effort. If I were 
starting from scratch right 
now and had nothing, I 
would probably go the Fig. 



1 route just for sheer sim- 
plicity and lack of cost The 
ac power/dc backup is a 
must. Then go with Fig, 3, 
Configuration 1. The Radio 
Shack "CUBE" is a nice lit- 
tle performer for under $20, 
and it's much less on sale. I 
have included an Align- 
ment and Adjustment sec- 
tion {see box), and most of 
these notes are taken right 
from the original authors' 
information, I have tried 
them all, and they work, so I 
decided to pass them along 
unchanged. All are of the 
nature that once done cor- 
rectly, you can forget them 
and just enjoy the results. I 
have not noticed any drift- 
type problems or anything 
that would cause a problem 
when you are counting on 
the monitor to be working. 
A very reliable device in- 
deed is what it turned out to 
be. May your marriage of 
components and parts be as 
happy and long lived as 
mine! 



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INSTITUTIONAL AND DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. ^^ 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 113 




Wayne Green Books 







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Annotated BASIC explains the complexities of modern BASIC, it includes com 
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Annotated BASIC Volume f contains Protecting Prodis. Surveyor Trnngs to Do Ta* Shelter Introduction to 

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Please alio* 4-5 weeks after publication for delivery Questions regarding you' order^ Please write to Customer Service at the above address 



114 73Magazine * ApriU982 



Better by the dozen. 






NEVER SAY DIE-ifvo U want 

controversy, Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will 
give it to you. His popular column ranges 
from travelogue to tirade and is guaran- 
teed to entertain, inspire and enlighten you. 



DX — This glove-trotting column keeps 
you informed about the news of the DX 
world from Kingman Reef to Bahrain. 



CONTESTS You get all 

news on the contest world from Robert 

Baker WB2CFE He'll give you information 
on upcoming events and results from re- 
cent contests. 



FUN — lust for fun, John Edwards KI2U 
provides you with wacky puzzles, quizzes, 
and games that test your ham mettle. 

FCC — If you're looking to the future, 
these outtakes from the Federal Register 
chronicle changes in policy and regula- 
tions that relate to amateur radio. 



RTTY LOOP-To keep you 

abreast of radioteletype developments, 
Marc Leavey WA3AJR explains the new 
R i TY equipment, the increasing role of 

computers in RTTY, and other matters of interest to 

digital communications fans. 









10. 
11. 

12. 



REV I E\Af S~ Before you buy, save 
yourself some money check 73's in- 
depth evaluation of the latest gear. 

HAM HELP — As a service to you, 
7'S prints your questions in our magazine. 

This helps you to obtain hard-to-get parts, 
schematics, and owner's manuals. 

SATELLITES-From Phase III to 

TVRO; 73 Magazine covers the news of 
the satellite world like no other radio 
amateur magazine. 

NEW PRODUCTS-ihis 

brief loqk at the latest ham equipment 
on the market keeps you on top of new 
developments in amateur radio. 

AWARDS-To find out what 
certificates are available where, read Bill 
Gosney KE7Cs coverage of all the ham 
radio awards, 



CONSTRUCTION 

The builder's 
I magazine 

that's 73, You get 
the best projects from 
the best authors 
every month. 




Send me a dozen issues of 
for the dozen reasons listed above! 

D 1 year USA $19 97 

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116 73 Magazine • April, 1982 





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73Magazine • April, 1982 117 



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REVIEW 



THE MICflOLOG ACT-1 
RTTY/CW TERMINAL 

At first glance, the Microlog 
ACT-1 bears a close resem- 
blance to many other keyboards 
offered to the amateur RTTY 
and CW enthusiast. There's a 
keyboard, a couple of switches 
and an LED on top, and a bank 
of connectors on the rear panel. 
Unassuming? Perhaps, but in 
reality the ACT-1 serves as a 
firm reminder thai appearances 
can be misreading. 

The Features 

The ACT-1 is a completely 
self-contained unit capable of 
sending and receiving Morse T 
Baudot, and ASCII codes. It also 
can send alphanumeric informa- 
tion in SSTV format. By "self- 
contained,** we mean that a de- 
modulator, AFSK generator, 
video board, and printer inter- 
face are all contained inside 
the keyboard's cabinet. No oth- 
er devices are necessary, and a 
few simple connections are suf- 
ficient to put the system on 
the air. 

All commands are entered via 
the 63-key keyboard. In addition 
to the usual alphanumeric keys, 
there are special keys like CTRL, 
KN P AR, SK, and Here Is. Press- 
ing the CTRL or shift key along 
with one of the other keys re- 
sults In a command being gen- 
erated. CTRL M, for example, 
switches the unit from the RTTY 
mode to CW- Almost all com- 
mands are entered with just two 
keys. Listing, much less describ- 
ing, all that the ACT-1 is capable 



of would take far more space 
than is available here, so we'll 
try to hit only the main points. 

There Is a dual-tone demod- 
ulator and a single-channel 
direct detector. Both demod- 
ulators can be inverted with a 
keyboard command. The dual- 
tone demodulator decodes both 
mark and space tones and has a 
keyboard-setectable high or low 
tone setting. The high-tone set* 
ting provides a standard 170- Hz 
shift with tones at 2125 and 2295 
Hz and is preceded by a sharp 
bandpass filter. The low-tone 
setting is also factory set to 170 
Hz, but tones are at 800 and 970 
Hz. No bandpass filter is provid- 
ed for this section. 

If you find yourself copying a 
lot of broadcast services, you 
can reset the low tone pair easi- 
ly to a more useful pair, like 
425-Hz shift at 2125 and 2550. 

The single-channel demod- 
ulator copies only the mark fre- 
quency and is set to decode at 
800 Hz, which corresponds nice- 
ly to the peak in many receivers' 
CW filter. It generally is used for 
copying stations which are us- 
ing a shift not programmed into 
either of the settings for the 
dual-tone demodulator. 

Ease of tuning can be a big 
factor in the amount of satisfac- 
tion a demodulator gives. We 
have grown rather accustomed 
to the meter-tuning system used 
in HAL, Macrotronics, and other 
equipment, so the single LED 
used for tuning the ACT-1 took 
us by surprise. It works very well 
and is at least as efficient as a 




meter. Best of aii T there is a re* 
generation circuit that lets the 
user hear what's being decoded. 
You simply tune the receiver un* 
til the code coming from the 
ACT-1's speaker sounds right* 

Tuning is virtually foolproof in 
either RTTY or CW modes, and 
the regeneration should be par- 
ticularly welcome to hams with 
impaired vision. Those of us 
who crave silent operation will 
be equally pleased to know that 
the monitor is easily turned off 
by flicking a switch on the front 
panel And if you still insist on 
using an oscilloscope for tun* 
ing, rest assured that outputs 
are provided for this purpose. 

Provision for transmitting 
with either AFSK or FSK is in* 
eluded. Like most manufac- 
turers, Microlog is partial to the 
AFSK method, and they advo- 
cate its use for a variety of 
reasons which you may or may 
not find compelling. For rugged 
individualists who prefer direct 
FSK keying, ample information 
on connecting the ACT-1 to a 
variety of transceivers is in- 
eluded. 

Actually, connection to 
everything is easy and very well 
documented in the instruction 
manual. Much attention has 
been patd to making the ACT-1 
compatible with virtually every 
rig available. You won T t have to 
haywire any special interfaces 
to get the ACT-1 on the air. 

CW keying is available for 
both negative- and positive- 
keyed rigs. The maximum nega- 
tive keydown rating is -150 V al 
50 mA. Positive keying is rated 
at 40 V at 300 m A. 

Rear-panel jacks also are pro- 
vided for a cassette tape re- 
corder a 40-column serial 
printer, and an external de* 
modulator. Video output is via a 
standard photo jack, but since 



there is plenty of room tor a BNC 
connector, I wonder why one 
wasn't used. 

There is true split-screen 
operation, allowing the operator 
to see what he is typing into the 
buffer while receiving text on 
the bottom half, The text buffer 
holds up to 1300 characters, 
which is certainly respectable. 
To help customize the system to 
particular needs, the split tine 
can be set anywhere from none 
at at) to 20 lines down. 

When transmitting, the ACT-1 
can be set to send as soon as a 
character has been typed or it 
can wait until a complete word 
has been typed. The latter op* 
tion Is convenient because it 
allows you to catch and correct 
errors before they go out 

To aid receiving, an ANCW 
(anti-CW) feature is included, 
which behaves like the autostart 
found on other units. When en- 
abled, ANCW inhibits display of 
non-RTTY signals and is very 
helpful when tuning across the 
band reading the mail. The 
UNOS (unshaft on space) and 
sync options also behave like 
similar features on other units. 
The UNOS shifts the ACT-1 to 
the LTRS mode on receipt of a 
Baudot word space code* which 
prevents the system from get- 
ting stuck in the FIGS mode if a 
burst of interference covers up 
the command to shift, The sync 
simply sends a blank code 
whenever the system is in the 
transmit mode, but there are no 
Characters to transmit. Both 
UNOS and sync can be switched 
off and on from the keyboard. 

Baudot speeds of 60, 66, 75* 
100* and 132 words per minute, 
ASCII at 110 and 300 baud, and 
CW at 5-199 words per minute 
are available. In the RTTY mode, 
speeds are selected by typing 
CTRL X, entering the speed 




The Microlog ACT-1. (Photo by KA1LR) 
120 73Magazine • April, 1982 



Rear view of the ACT-h (Photo by KA1LR) 



numerically, and then hitting 
any non-numeric key. This Is 
fine for operators who rarely 
change speed, but annoying if 
you are trying to discover what 
speed a station is using by try- 
ing every possibility. Perhaps an 
option could be added to allow 
stepping through the speeds by 
repeatedly pressing a key. 

Turning to features which 
some might term luxuries, there 
is a real-time clock whose dis- 
play is always visible at the top 
of the screen. The time can be 
transmitted by entering a simple 
command. The clock must, of 
course, be reset every time the 
unit is turned on, but Microlog 
says that the ACT-1 is designed 
for continuous-duty operation 
and never needs to be turned off. 

Memories 

While the ACT-1 's array of 
memories is not as extensive as 
that which certain microcom- 
puter interface combination 
systems offer, there is enough 
to satisfy most hams' needs. 
There are two ID memories 
which hold up to 19 characters 
each and ten message mem- 
ories holding up to 40 char- 
acters each. The message mem- 
ories are soft-partitioned, so you 
can program messages longer 
than 40 characters if you like. It 
is possible, for example, to 
create a single message 400 
characters long, but then there 
won't be room for any other 
messages. 

An eight-character WRU 
message allows storage of a 
short code. When the CT-1 
receives text that matches the 
code exactly, it automatically 
transmits whatever is in the ID 
memory and then returns to the 
receive mode. Two selective- 
print memories allow others to 
leave a message on your equip- 
ment while you are away from 
the shack. Upon receipt of text 
that matches the text in the first 
memory, the printer is activated 
and hard copy is produced of ev- 
erything the ACT-1 hears, as- 
suming you have a printer con- 
nected, Receipt of text that 
matches the text in the second 
memory turns the printer back 
off. Used together, the WRU and 
selective print feature represent 
a simple but effective means of 
providing unattended operation. 

While not quite as convenient 
as on-board memory, a reliable 
interface is provided which 
allows information to be stored 
on a cassette tape recorder and 




Inside the ACT-1, (Photo by KA1LR) 



played back at will. You can 
record and play back messages 
entered from the keyboard or 
copied off the air Finally, thre 
are two preprogrammed mes- 
sages. One sends an RYRY se- 
ries and the other sends every 
letter of the alphabet in "quick 
brown fox. , ." form. 

In Use 

Once you have everything 
figured out (it took us a whole 
day!), youll find that the ACT-1 
is a powerful tool You'll find 
yourself referring to the manual 
quite often, and it is herethat we 
must voice a small complaint. 
The instruction manual is one of 
the best we've seen at describ- 
ing the steps necessary for in- 
terfacing the unit to the rest of 
the station, but the organization 
of the how-to-use-it material 
couid stand some improvement. 
Even the inclusion of a prompt 
card to be kept on the operating 
tabic could make a big differ- 
ence. With so many commands 
that don't always use mnemonic 
devices to aid memory, a prompt 
card is a must. 

Some basic information for 
beginning RTTY operators also 
is needed. The manual suggests 
that beginners get one of the 
"RTTY-primer handbooks/' 
Since dealers' shelves aren't ex- 
actly overflowing with RTTY 
books, this advice isn't much 
heip to the guy who just got his 
ACT-1 and wants to put it on the 
air right away. A short section 
on RTTY operating procedures 
really is needed. 

We may complain about the 
manual, but we can't fault the 
ACT-1 's performance. Using it is 
sheer, unadulterated pleasure! 
As far as we're concerned, the 
most important aspect of a self- 
contained unit is its demod- 
ulator, and we've seen some 



pretty horrible ones. Any reser- 
vations we may have had were 
quickly put aside as we watched 
the Sanyo monitor display per- 
fect copy from an S-nothing 
signal buried under SSB splat- 
ter, CWj and a couple of other 
RTTY stations. A remarkable 
performance. We also enjoyed 
the variety of shifts that can be 
copied easily. Broadcast moni- 
toring is great sport, and if you 
have a general-coverage 
receiver, you'll want to retune 
the second filter to 425 Hz im- 
mediately. 

Operation in the RTTY mode 
was trouble-free and straightfor- 
ward, CW operation is as good 
as anything else we've 
used — perfect copy from ma- 
chine-sent code, not-so-perfect 
copy from the straight key and 
bug contingent. 

Conclusions 

Even if youVe already decid- 
ed to use a computer and inter- 
face combination for RTTY, the 
ACT-1 deserves careful con- 
sideration. The ACT-1 f which 
has a suggested price of $995, 
has everything even a serious 



operator could ask for. Because 
It Is self-contained, it takes up 
very iittle room on the operating 
desk. And even if you are plan- 
ning to get a computer, a unit 
like the ACT-1 can free it for 
more important tasks. 

For more information, con- 
tact Microlog Corporation, 4 
Professional Drive, Suite 119, 
Gaithersburg MD 20879. Reader 
Service number 485. 

Paul Grupp KA1LR/4 
Cassel berry FL 

THE MFJ-312 
VHF CONVERTER 

Most of us have wondered at 
one time or another just what 
takes place on our VHF public 
service bands. The scream of a 
squad car's siren, a black col- 
umn of smoke on the horizon, 
or a threatening weather front 
in the southwest have given 
many a ham an urge to plunk 
down hard cash for a synthe- 
sized public service band 
receiver. If the spirit is willing 
but the pocketbook is not, take 
courage. MFJ has a clever new 
converter that allows a stan- 
dard two-meter receiver to 
serve as a receiver for that 
band. 

In most installations, the 
palm-sized MFJ-312 connects 
to a 12-V-dc power source and a 
two-meter antenna and 
transceiver. The converter 
covers the 160-164-MHz and 
154-158-MHz bands, allowing 
access to police, fire, and 
NOAA weather transmissions 
in most areas. 

There are only two switches 
and an LED on the front panel. 
The left-hand switch selects 
one of the two bands. The other 
switches the box in and out of 
the antenna line and also turns 
the power on and off, 




The MFJ-312, (Photo by KA1LR) 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 



121 



To listen, you merely turn the 
converter on and tune the two- 
meter receiver as you would 
normally. In the 150-154-MHz 
band, you set the receiver to ex- 
actly 10 MHz below the desired 
frequency. Thus, 154.20 would 
be heard with the receiver set to 
144.20, and 151.335 would be 
found at 141.335 on your rig's 
dial. In the 160-164-MHz band, 
it's a little more challeng- 
ing— you must set the receiver 
16 MHz below desired range. 
Since the activity in this band is 
generally limited to a single 
NOAA weather station, there 
isn't much of a problem. 

In Use 

The MFJ-312 performs like a 
champ. Most listeners won't 
guess that a converter/receiver 
combination is being used un- 
less you tell them. The MOSFET 
mixer and rf amplifier are un- 
doubtedly responsible for the 
clean, image-free reception, As 
can be expected, there is a 
slight increase in noise level 
when the converter is switched 
on, but the level never reaches 
objectionable proportions. 

I never tried an antenna cut 
to 154 MHz, but I suspect that 
using one might result in an 
even better performance than I 
experienced using antennas 
designed for two meters. For 
most purposes, a two-meter 
mobile or base antenna will be 
more than adequate. 

I had a hard time deciding 
whether to keep the converter 
in the house or permanently in- 
stalled in my car. If you con- 
template mobile operations, 
you should be aware that some 
states and municipalities take 
a dim view of anyone in a vehi- 
cle monitoring the local gen* 
darmes. And even if such activi- 
ty is perfectly legal in your area, 
it's healthiest to mount the con- 
verter inconspicuously. Don't 
say I didn't warn you. 

Of course, to make the most 
of this converter, you need a 
synthesized transceiver. So 
much the better if you have one 
with a lot of memories. It's 
often necessary to bounce be- 
tween two frequencies to hear 
both sides of a conversation, so 
scanning is helpful, too. I used 
the converter for several 
months with a KDK transceiver 
that has two banks of five 
memories. I used one bank to 
store public service frequen- 
cies and the other for two- 
meter repeaters. Kenwood, 
Azden, Yaesu T and others also 

122 73 Magazine * April, 1982 




The MFJ-312 with top cover removed. (Photo by KA1LR) 



make transceivers whose scan- 
ning capabilities and large 
number of memories make 
them ideal for use with the 312. 

An interesting feature is the 
feedthrough of two-meter 
signals when the converter is 
switched on. Tm not sure 
whether this was really intend- 
ed or not, but MFJ makes the 
best of it and suggests that you 
program repeater frequencies 
amidst the police ones and 
listen to both even though the 
converter is switched on. Al- 
though signals in the two-meter 
band are heard with signifi- 
cantly reduced sensitivity in 
this mode, strong signals come 
through loud and clear. This Is 
especially useful for those of 
us who feel obligated to keep 
an ear open for activity on a cer- 
tain repeater but don't want to 
be switching the converter on 
and off all the time. 

This brings up the certainty 
of accidentally transmitting in- 
to the device when it's turned 
on. MFJ says that the converter 
is protected against accidental 
transmissions at power levels 
up to 25 Watts, but warns that 
this sort of abuse might be hard 
on the transmitter's finals. For 
what it's worth, we pumped 40 
Watts into the MFJ-312 for sev- 
eral seconds on many occa- 
sions, and neither the transmit- 
ter nor the converter com- 
plained. 

The purists among you are 
probably wondering what ef- 
fect if any the converter has on 
two-meter operations when it's 
not in use. Theoretically, It 
should have none, since it 
passes the signal straight 
through when it is switched 
out. We noted, however, a 
slight increase in swr and a cor- 
responding decrease in receiv- 
er sensitivity. Emphasis must 



be placed on the word slight. In 
most areas, the loss either 
coming or going might not even 
be noticed. In areas where 
signals are often less than fuH- 
quieting and you need to 
squeeze every last dB out of 
your system, you should make 
provisions for switching the 
converter out of the circuit 
when it's not in use. 

Conclusions 

The MFJ-312 greatly expands 
one's listening horizons at the 
very attractive price of $59.95. 
Using a two-meter rig as the i-f 
stage makes good sense eco- 
nomically for a ham already 
equipped with a digital wonder- 
radio. If you find you enjoy 
public service listening, the 
converter will be one of most 
useful pieces of radio equip- 
ment to be had at such a low 
price. And if you decide that it's 
really not your cup of tea after 
all, you'll have the satisfaction 
of knowing you found out with- 
out blowing a week's pay for a 
scanner! 

For more information, con- 
tact MFJ Enterprises, PO Box 
494 f Mississippi State MS 
39762. Reader Service number 
484. 

PaulGruppKA1LR/4 
Casselberry FL 

EMC GROUNDING BRAID 

The Eledric Motion Company 
of Winsted, Connecticut, has in- 
troduced a product to end hams* 
grounding woes. Their flexible 
copper braid is equivalent to #6 
AWG(!) and is well-tinned to 
reduce corrosion. It appears to 
provide about 2.5 times the con- 
ductor area of RG-8/U braid 
traditionally used for grounding. 
Best of all, it is supplied in 25- 
and 50-foot coils, banishing 



forever the dubious privilege of 
stripping braid from coax. 

In Use 

We have had the opportunity 
to install EMCs product in 
several shacks and in each case 
were impressed with the ma- 
terial. The braid should be 
brought into the shack from a 
good grounding point, with at- 
tention paid to keeping its 
length as short as possible. The 
braid can be run either behind 
the equipment desk, with sep- 
arate pieces attached to each 
piece of gear, or to a central 
grounding point to which all 
equipment is connected. Both 
methods seem to work satisfac- 
torily. Care should be taken to 
ground everything in your sys- 
tem: keyer, clock, amplifiers, 
low-pass filters, power supplies, 
the works. We used short pieces 
of braid for this purpose and 
were pieased with how easy it is 
to cut and handle. 

We encountered some prob- 
lems in making connections to 
the braid due to its formidable 
size and the poor connnection 
points provided on many pieces 
of radio equipment. One high- 
power amplifier from a promi- 
nent manufacturer appears to 
have no ground point at all! A 
low-pass filter we use also has 
no ground connection point, 
although the instruction sheet 
supplied with it emphasizes the 
importance of providing it with a 
good ground. Some manufactur- 
ers provide their gear with the 
so-called five-way binding post, 
which is suitable only for rela- 
tively small-diameter wire (inad- 
equate for rf grounding). In 
these and similar cases (assum- 
ing the chassis is supposed to 
be at ground), you should drill a 
hole in the chassis and fit it out 
with a hefty connection point 
and a couple of large washers. 

Because of the braid's size, 
soldering to it can be difficult. It 
serves as a very long heat sink! 
Our 300-Watt iron clearly was 
not equal to the task, You'll 
either need to make purely me- 
chanical connections using 
nuts and bolts or round up a 
more formidable source of heat 
than the one we tried! 

Conclusions 

While there undoubtedly has 
been suitable braid commercial- 
ly available somewhere before, 
it is encouraging to see a manu- 
facturer making it available 
directly to the amateur market. 



For those who insist on having a 
shack that they know is set up 
properly, the EMC braid is a 
must. There is simply no longer 
any excuse for rf burns or TVI 
caused by poor connection to 
ground! The material should 
also be useful for bonding auto- 
mobile body and chassis com- 
ponents together to reduce RFI. 
For more information, con- 
tact the Electric Motion Com- 
pany, tnc. t 100 Whiting Street, 
PO Box 626, Winsted CT 06098. 
Reader Service number 483. 

PaulGrupp KA1LR/4 
Casselberry FL 

TALK MAN C900 
PORTABLE TRANSCEIVER 

Exasperated! ft's easy to feel 
that way when confronted with 
some of the gadgets produced 
in the name of progress by the 
personal communications in- 
dustry. From glow-in-the-dark 
CB antennas (you don't have 
one, do you?) to Bone Fones, 
there have been some real 
weirdos. Maybe this helps to ex- 
plain why I took such delight in 
the Talkman Model C900, the 
latest In communications gad- 
getry from Standard Communi- 
cations. At Fast! A gadget that's 
really worthwhile! 

The Talkman is a portable FM 
transceiver which anyone may 
operate without a license. Most 
of the circuitry is contained in a 
small belt pack measuring just 
4" x 2.5" x. 75" and weighing a 
mere 9 ounces. An ultralight 
headset holds a tiny electric 
mike t earphone, and whip anten- 
na. Despite its diminutive size, 
however, the Talkman is not a 
toy, especially at its suggested 
$129.95 price tag. The Talkman 
operates on one of several chan* 
nels available in the 49.830- 
49.890 MHz range. Since the rig 
is sold singly, not in pairs, 
buyers who hope to do any conv 
municating must be careful to 




Standard's Talkman. 



obtain units on the same chan- 
nel. A letter designation on the 
back of the belt pack indicates 
the channel. 

Technical Features 

Most notably, transmit-re- 

ceive switching is accomplished 
using VOX circuitry. This makes 
operating the Talkman a totally 
hands-free proposition— a real 
convenience in many situations. 
Is this use of VOX a first for a 
communications device intend- 
ed for the general public? 

A straightforward assem- 
blage of 15 transistors and 4 ICs 
composes the circuitry of the 
Talkman. The mode is narrow* 
band FM and, in compliance 
with Part 15 of the FCC regula- 
tions, the transmitter output 
power is less than 100 mW. On 
receive, a 0.25-uV signal will 
break the non-adjustable 
squelch, and a 0,5-uV signal 
gives 20 dB of quieting. An ordi- 
nary 9-V battery powers the unit. 



Current drain Is 13.5 mA 
squelched, 70 mA while receiv* 
ing, and 80 mA in transmit. 

Controls on the Talkman are 
minima], to say the least, with a 
pair of three-position slide 
switches doing it all One switch 
turns on the unit and allows se* 
lection of low or high earphone 
volume. The second switch is for 
VOX sensitivity: low, medium, or 
high. The higher the setting of 
this control, the more softly you 
can speak and still trip the VOX. 
On the other hand, a lower set* 
ting helps to prevent ambient 
noise from actuating the trans- 
mitter. 

Does It Work? 

Yes, it does. In actual use, the 
Talkman meets or exceeds the 
claims made by Standard. With 
the whip antenna completely de- 
ployed, the full 1/4-mile range 
between units is achieved, al- 
though signals are not full quiet* 
mg. Audio quality is on a par 



with most amateur hand-helds— 
not high fidelity, but perfectly 
OK for spoken communications. 
The headset is extremely light- 
weight and a pleasure to use, 
although the placement of the 
microphone is extremely impor- 
tant for reliable VOX action. My 
best results were obtained with 
the foam windscreen almost 
touching my lips. One complaint 
about the headset: The mike 
boom is a little too short for 
some adults. 

Possibilities 

Of course, the proximity of 
the Talkman's operating fre- 
quency to our six-meter ham 
band led immediately to 
thoughts of a conversion to 50 
MHz. Unfortunately, the Talk- 
mans I tested were not my own, 
so I was not at liberty to tamper 
with the innards. A schematic Is 
included with each Talkman. 
and it appears that altering the 
operating frequency would not 
be too difficult, I'm sure it won't 
be long before we see a few of 
these little gems on six meters. 

In Conclusion 

I'd be the last to claim that the 
Talkman represents any sort of 
communications breakthrough. 
Still, for many uses— keeping 
track of buddies at a hamfest or 
talking to earthbound helpers 
from the top of your tower, for ex- 
ample—the Talkman may prove 
far handier than your handie- 
talkie. Perhaps we'll begin to see 
Standard's very convenient 
headset concept spreading soon 
to our portable ham rigs, It can't 
happen too soon for me. 

For further information, con- 
tact Standard Communications, 
PO Box 92157, Los Angeles CA 
90009, Reader Service number 
486. 

Jeff Defray WBSBTH 
73 Magazine Staff 




THE UK SCENE 

Last year, my family and I en- 
joyed a holiday in Florida. We 
tramped most of the usual 
tourist paths including the Sea- 
quarium. the Kennedy Space 
Center, the beaches, the fast 
food stores (still something of a 



novelty in England), and, of 
course, Disney World. 

Obtaining a reciprocal license 
was the easiest of aif the jobs 
necessary in planning my USA 
visit. A photocopy of my current 
license together with an official 
letter confirming that it was still 



active sent to the FCC brought 
the necessary document within 
a few weeks. 

When I received the recipro- 
cal license, I realized that the on- 
ly way I could get some HF 
operating {not being really in- 
terested in VHF) was to visit a 
local ham. I mentioned to Fred 
Van Aalst WD4RAF, who lives In 
Fort Lauderdale, that I was 
planning a visit to Florida and 
he kindly invited me to meet 
with him. 

While my family and Fred's 



XYL, Pearl, did some shopping, I 
activitated G4EJA/W4. Need* 
less to say, it was on a day when 
the HF bands were in poor 
shape and I was unable to make 
any contact with Europe. I 
called M CQ DX n on 15 and was 
answered by a WG. It was a mo- 
ment before that I realized I was 
probably as far from him then as 
I would be at home. There is lit- 
tle point in me describing 
operating in the US (that would 
be taking coals to Newcastle, to 
quote a quaint English proverb). 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 123 





Jeff Maynard G4EJA operating at the desk of Fred Van Aalst 
WD4RAF in Ft, Lauderdale, Florida. 



The shack of G4EJA showing the RTTYgear with WfK QSi cards in 
the background. 



What might be of interest, 
however, is the view from 
this side. 

There is no equivalent of the 
FCC in the United Kingdom. The 
regulatory body for amateur 
radio (and for all other aspects 
of radio) is the Home Office. 
This is a government body, 
headed by a Minister (Secretary 
of State), which looks after, 
among other things, the police 
and the maintenance of law and 
order. The main instrument of 
control is the Wireless Tel- 
egraph Act of 1944 which em- 
powers the Secretary of State to 
do just about anything. The 
Home Office Is assisted by the 
Post Office (now known as 
British Telecom) in such matters 
as interference suppression and 
equipment testing. 

The first requirement for a 
license is to pass the Radio 
Amateur's Examination* known 
by everyone as the RAE. Sittings 
for the RAE are heid twice each 
year, usually in May and 
December, with the results be- 
ing announced about three 
months later in each case. The 



examination paper, which is set 
by the City and Guilds of London 
Institute on behalf of the Home 
Office, is divided into two parts. 

Part One deals with licensing 
conditions and Part Two covers 
elementary radio theory and 
operating procedures appro- 
priate to the Radio Amateur Ser- 
vice, For a candidate to be suc- 
cessful, 55% or more of the 
multiple choice questions must 
be answered correctly* 

An RAE pass slip is all that 
is required for a ll B" license 
permitting operation at 144 
MHz and above (all modes ex- 
cept CW). The "A" or full li- 
cense for operation on all bands 
and all modes requires a GW 
test in addition to passing the 
theory exam. 

The Morse test, which is ad- 
ministered informally by the 
British Telecom, requires the ap- 
plicant to send and receive plain 
text and figure groups at twelve 
words per minute. Punctuation 
and procedure signals are not 
part of the test. 

With the iicense comes a 
callsign. A particular tetter 36- 



OBTAtNING A UK RECIPROCAL LICENSE 

Citizens of the US intending to visit the United Kingdom 
may obtain a reciprocal G5 license providing they hold a 
General, Extra, or Advanced US license (holders of Novice and 
Technician licenses cannot apply even for a UK B-type 
license). 

Applications, on the appropriate form together with a 
photocopy of the applicant's current license, should be sent 
to: Amateur Radio Regulatory DepL, The Home Office, 
Waterloo Bridge House. Waterloo Road, London SE1 SUA. 

If a permanent address in the UK can be given, a license for 
6 months will be issued; otherwise, a two-month mobile 
license is given. The current fee is £8. (US $16) for either of 
these. The callsign will be in the series G50-. 



quence can be asked for and will 
be given if not already allocated; 
however, the applicant must 
wait until that special sequence 
is ready for issue. The UK call- 
sign system Ls based on Civil 
Service logic and is therefore im- 
possible to understand. How- 
ever, this story would not be 
complete without a description, 
so here goes! 

The callsign consists of four 
parts: country identifier, class of 
license indicator, unique li- 
censee sequence, and optional 
suffix. 

The country identifier is one 
or two letters at the beginning of 
the call that indicates that part 
of the United Kingdom from 
which the station is currently 
operating. The prefixes are 
G— England, GM — Scotland, 
Gl — Northern Ireland, GW— 
Wales, GD— Isle of Man, GJ — 
Jersey, and GU— Guernsey. 

The country identifier 
changes when the station 
moves. Thus if I drive about 25 
miles south Into the principality 
of Wales, my callsign becomes 
GW4EJAM This highlights the 
major difference between UK 
and USA calisigns: in the UK, 
the combination of figure and 
letter sequence (e.g., 4EJA) is 
unique. 

The figure following the coun- 
try identifier indicates the class 
of license (except as noted be- 
low) as follows: 2,3,4,— A (full) 
license; 8.8— B (VHF) license- 
Some hams from the early 
days still hold G8 and G€ plus 
two <e*g. p G8AB, G6JM) calls: 
these are full type-A license 
holders and are the only way to 
work these prefixes on HF. 

A callsign with a 5 indicates 
the holder of a reciprocal 



license. 

If I operate from a car, the 
usual /M is added. The suffix /P 
is added when operating from a 
"temporary location" or as a 
pedestrian. Operating from tern* 
porary premises requires the 
use of the suffix /A (presumed to 
represent "alternative"). 

If you understand this all so 
far, the picture is completed 
with the GB prefix used for 
special event stations. Two par- 
ticular GB callsigns to look out 
for are GB2RS, the news bulletin 
station of the Radio Society of 
Great Britain, and GB2ATG, the 
RTTY news bulletin station of 
the British Amateur Radio 
Teleprinter Group (BARTG), 

Having crossed the various 
bridges to date and obtained a 
full (A) license, the road is by no 
means as smooth as it might be. 
The Wireless Telegraphy Act 
already mentioned is fraught 
with problems for the unwary. It 
is a requirement of the UK 
amateur license that a licensee 
must be able to verify that his 
transmissions are within the 
authorized frequency band. 

It is not permitted in the UK to 
listen to transmissions other 
than from authorized broadcast 
stations and radio amateurs. 

The final damping factor is a 
feature of UK local goverment; it 
is necessary to obtain "planning 
permission" for any permanent 
structure over 10 feet in height- 1 
spent two years battling with my 
local authority before being 
allowed (somewhat reluctantly) 
to erect a tower. Even then the 
permission was only for a tilt- 
over and included the rider that 
it "should be erected for no 



124 73 Magazine * April,1982 



more than 15 daylight hours per 
week," 

So tfaafs a quick look at the 
UK amateur radio scene. I hope 
it will contribute something to 
more and better QSOs across 



the pond. Any reader lacking a 

QSO with England is welcome 
to a sked (write or telex to 
62881 1 » on CW, SSB, or RTTY (or 
even SSTV with some notice), 
and if you hear me, J am still 



chasing counties for QCA and I 
need Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, 
Montana, Idaho, and Nebraska 

for WAS? 

Finally, thanks again to Fred 
WD4RAF for his help in in- 



troducing me to stateside 

operating. Any US hams travel- 
ing this way are welcome to call. 

Jeff Maynard G4EJA 
Cheshire, England 



FUN! 





John Edwards KI2U 
78-56 86th Street 
Glendate NY 11385 



CLANDESTINE RADIO 

This month's column is devoted to clandestine radio. Recent 
events have once again proved to us that the right of operating free 
and open radio stations is something we should never take too light- 
ly. Over the years, both amateurs and non-amateurs have suffered 
when the privilege of unhindered radio communication has been 
yanked away by autocratic regimes. This month we pay tribute to 
those brave individuals and groups who have put the public's right 
to know above Iheir own personal safety- 

ELEMENT 1 -CROSSWORD PUZZLE 

lustration 1) 



10) Iranian religion 

11) Cuban station— digit 
14)3,1416 

15) Bury or understand 



Across 

1) Underground user's gear Is 

usually this 
7) Attack feared by resistance 

groups 



17) Morse, Baudot, etc. 

18) Direction 



equipment 
21) Where the generals stay 
24) A communication device us- 
ing the sun's rays: 
graph 

Down 

2) An interference (abbr.) 

3) Audio-visual (abbrj 

4) A banished citizen 

5) Prison QTH 

6) Favorite Soviet radio activity 

7) Commie color 

8) Clandestine operators often 
face this 

9) What you are 

12) Action of 24 across 



26) Martial law country's prefix 
28) US propaganda station (2 
words) 






13) WWII radio invention 

15) Opposite of don't 

16) Identification (abbr.) 

17) Secret code 
19) Press station 

20} Opposite of stereo 

22) Energy (abbr,) 

23) Baudot medium (abbr.) 
25) It goes with every pot 
27) English tavern 






ELEMENT 2— MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1) Which nation runs "Radio Peace and Progress"? 

1) Soviet Union 

2) Panama 

3) United States 

4) Japan 

2) Which of the following is not a US military station? 

1)WAR 

2) WIN 

3) NAV 

4) AIR 

3) An American underground TV station? Well, it happened in 
Syracuse, New York, in the fall of 1977. What sort of programming 
did "Lucky 7" provide its surprised viewers? 

1) Cartoons 

2) Pornographic movies 








Illustration t 



Wustration 2. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 125 



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If lustration 7 A 



Illustration 2 A. 



3) Revolutionary propaganda 

4) Game shows 

4) One of the oldest active clandestine broadcast stations is "Radio 
Espana Independient." It began operation in: 

1)1920 

2) 1941 

3) 1954 

4) 1975 

5) Back in the 1960s, the CIA ran a propaganda station on an 
obscure Caribbean Island. What was this island's name? 

1)Swan Island 

2) Hammarfund Island 

3) Johnson Island 

4) Hallicrafters Island 

ELEMENT 3- ALPHABET GAME 

Complete the names of the five clandestine broadcast stations 
listed below by placing letters of the alphabet on every dash. Use 
each letter only once. The letters J, K, W, X s and Z are not used. 

ABCDEFGHILMNOPQRSTUVY 

1) VOICE/ORNA_IB_A 

2) VOICE/OF/_A^E__TI_E 

3) VOICe/OFLRE_/_ANAR_JlSL_N_S 

4) VOlCE/OFfT_E/_AS_UE/_NDER_R_UND 

5) VOICE/OF/THE/E_t_REA/RE_OLUTION 

ELEMENT 4— H AMAZE 
(Illustration 2) 

Here's a new type of maze specif icaiiy geared to hams. The object 
is to start at the circle and trace your way to the square by filling in 
the answers to the clues given below. To help you on the way, we've 
already given you the first and last clue answers. All words read 
either vertically downward or from left to right. Each new word is on 
a perpendicular angle to the previous word. Words join on a common 
letter. Good luck. 



14) Nuts 

15) One who is chicken 

16) Victor 



17) Self-respect 

18) Hurry 

19) One who plays 



1) Organized aggression 

2) Stumble speak 

3) To hide 

4) An organization that may 
run a clandestine station: 
group 

5) Discreditable revelation 

6) From that place 

12$ 73Magazine * April, 1982 



7) A path 

8) Disembarks 

9) To view 

10) Energy often in short supply 
to underground stations 

11) Secret watcher 

12) Aerials 

13) 1960s Soviet invasion place 



THE ANSWERS 



Element 1: 

See Illustration 1A. 



Element 2: 

1_1 Peacefully progressing toward what? It's the USSR's answer 

to Radio Free Europe. (They couldn't call it "Radio Enslaved 

Europe," could they?) 
2—2 WIN was a button. 
3—2 Pass the popcorn. 
4—2 Patience is a virtue. 
5—1 How about "Kenwood island"? 

El&ment 3: 

1—VOICE OF NAMIBIA, 2— VOICE OF PALESTINE. 3-VOICE OF 
FREE CANARY ISLANDS, 4-VOICE OF THE BASQUE UNDER- 
GROUND, 5— VOICE OF THE ERITREA REVOLUTION. 

Element 4: 

See Illustration 2A. 



SCORING 

Element 1: 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle, or 1/2 point for each 

question correctly answered. 

Element 2: 

Five points for each correct answer. 

Element 3: 

Five points for each correct answer. 

Element 4: 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle, or one point for each 

word solved. 

How'd ya do? 

1-20 points— "Is the VOA clandestine?" 
21-40 points— Once heard Radio Peking, 
41-60 points— Scans the band— but hears nothing. 
61-80 points—Single agent. 
81-100+ points— Double agent. 



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FOR 
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CONT 





rf . «»ESS SEHHCES 



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The 79 



Test Equipment 
Library 



mow 




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M. Noll W3FOJ\ This Js the first collection of virtually 
every type of wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes 
dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction 
data for 73 different antenna types. Appendices 
describe ine construction of noise bridges, line tuners, 
and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, and swr SKi0 16 S5.50." 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS <2nd odl 
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TTL COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. Explains wfil 
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digital voltmeter and a digital tachometer. 
SK1063S9.50* 

CMOS COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster, Details the 
application of CMOS, the low power logic family 
suitable for most applications presently dominated by 
TTL. Required reading for every serious digital ex- 
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TVT COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaaler. Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a micropro- 
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BK1064S9 95." 




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• HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— 9K1201 — by Bruce F. Bogner and James R. Bodnar, a lawyer 
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THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO— by JefrolO Swank W8HXR 
t>egins w»|h a brief history of amateur radio and of Jerry & 
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What's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the 
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best way to go about getting an FCC license. A Guide to 
Ham Radio is an Ideal introduction to a hobby enjoyed 
by people around the world $4.95 " BK7321 

WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1982. 25TH EDITION 
—This book Is the bible of internal iqnal broadcasters, 
providing the only authoritative source of exact inform a- 
I ton aboul broadcasting and TV stations world wide 
This 1981 edition is completely revised, giving com- 
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560 pages of vita! aspects of world listening 
S16.50. 9K11A* 




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systems, CP/M, the 0OBQrBOB67ZBO chips, the ASR43 Wr- 
minal. Data base management, word processing, text 
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techniques and hardcore hardware construction prot- 
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TVTs are also nctudeo in this Earge format. 200 p-lus 
page edition. $10,95." 

• 40 COMPUTER GAMES— BK7381 — Forty games in all 
in nine different categories. Games for large and small 
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• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS— BK7340— This 

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COMPUTERS— BK73S2— A valuable addition to your 
computing library Thts two-part test includes she best 
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Microcomputing magazines on the hardware and soft 
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and wet i- structured text helps the reader get mvofved. 
$10,95* 

HOW TO 8UILD A MICROCOMPUTER -AND REALLY 
UNDERSTAND IT— by Sam Creason. The electronics 
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the design, construction, testing, and debugging of a 
complete microcomputer system. Must reading for 
anyone desiring a true understanding of small computer 
systems $9.95," BK7352 

HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HEREIIf you want to come 
up to spaed on how computers work— hardware and 
software—this rs an excellent book. It starts with fun- 
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projects. ASCII. Baudot, etc. This book has the highest 
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R.S. No, 



329 

114 
MS 
440 

20 



331 

7 

334 

97 

71 
121 



469 
11 

26 
430 



12 

32 

1D2 

321 

89 

■ 

28 
382 



A E A/ Advanced Electronic Applica- 
uons ii i - r , ■**£*■■•■«! ■-■ ■-■ ■ - ■ *iw 
A. R. Technical Products 31 

A5 ATV Magazine, ♦ 156 

Advanced Communications inter 

national * . * . ....... . 31 

Al I Elect ron IcS. ..*..«* » 33 

Alpha Delta Comm. r , . . . 99 

Alpha Delta Carom. — 133 

Amateur Electronic Supply 

Amateur Wholesale Electronics- - 21 
American Crystal Supply 154 

Amidon Associates ^97 

Amenna Bank. , * 71 

Applied Invention . .., 63 

ARCO Solar, inc. . .. .35 

Associated RadkX ..... ... 74 

As! ron Corp . . . * » 4 . . .......47 

Aute* Research, , 101 

BG Cart Electronics- .,*»,, ,,„,. 65 

Barker & Williamson , . 149 

Bash Educational Services. 148 
Benjamin Michael Industries, , . 106 
Brllts Two-Way ftadto. . . , 107 

3 uC Ks ffOCK . .................. OQ 

Bullet Electronics,... .,155 

C a A Roberts 113 

Ceco Communications, Inc. ,91 



R.S 

307 
17 



Page 



I ■ - m 



425 



..173 
...49 



453 

483 

447 
62 



Centurion International 

Certified International ., 

Outterfree Modular Consoles. 
Code Quick. 

Communications Center. NE. . . 
Communications Concepts, Inc. 



■»■ i b V H 



.97 
166 
117 
111 
170 

153 



377 Communications Electronics 



15 
444 

106 
120 



110 



Communications Specialists. 

Computer Plus 

Crown Micro Producta, t . . . „ 

%rf lyl%3 I iV-1 u ' I . . , ■ |HMIli1H4 

Custom Circuit Design 

Dayton Mamvenlion '82 55 

Dakota Microwave, , ,....,, . , . , . 86 
Dabco Elect ron lea/Home Ckmena 

.,...,....,. . . . Or 



176 

154 
153 
.47 
.64 



No, 

Debco Electronics 

Dielectric Comm^ ..... 
Derrick Electronics, Inc. 
Digital Research Paris, 

Dapple r Systems 

R. L Drake Company 

.9.113,132,148,149 

DXpeditions International. ...... 91 

80 Microcomputing. 150 

Electric Motion Co ♦ 122 

Electronic Equipment Bank, 71 

Electronic Hobby Innovations. . - . 7H 

Electronic Recyclers oi MA 154 

Electronic Specialists. ....,..- 133 

Eiectronictown. Inc. 99 

Engineering Consulting 154 

Ben Franklin Electronics, 154 

323 Fo*-Taj*go Corp. , 153 

23 Fleshes Corp,,. 27 

Ftiedsham TV Hardware. 63 

G b. K Amateur Supply 52 

Global Electronics, .58 

Gotham Antenna. . . . 101 

Grove Enterprises. 99 

H h R Communications- ........ 58 

Hal Communications. 15, 41. 92 

Ham Radio Center, 

Ham Radio Outlet .. 

Hamtronics, NY. 

Handi-Teh.... 

Hastings Antenna. 

Heath Company 

Heil, Ltd .............. 

higain Electronics. ...... t 

Hoosier Electronics, 

Hy-Gain Div. of Telex 

Hy-Gain Div. of Telex — 

ICOM ., Cov ll r 43, 1 18, 119 

MX Equipment. . 152 

iRL. i - 39 

independent Crystal Supply Co. 

■ . # ■ TOO 

Info-Tech . . . 97 

Instant Software 

Amateur Radio Programs, , . . ♦ , 147 

Iscan Engineering, ............ 1 52 



R.S, 

25 

38 

* 

91 

122 



No. 

JJT Distributing 



119 
400 
85 
439 



116 
101 

417 

* 

86 

345 

31 



33 

460 

18 

303 

479 

72 

320 

316 

481 

■ 

474 

78 

35 
445 

27 



452 

■ 

53 

47 

480 

484 

48 

477 

77 

44 



Page 

152 

Jameco Electronics. . . - - 175 

Johnson Commercial Services. . 154 

KDK Distributing 23 

KW Con t rol. .....,...,.■-, ....,48 

Kantronlcs. >. , ... 48, 105, 133 

Kenwood. *+ • Gov IV, 7 

Lacue Communications Electronics 

114 

Lewis Construction Co.. 96 

Live Via Satellite. Inc ..,.63 



R.S. No. 

105 Radios Unlimited. 

62 Ramsey EJect/onics. 

54 Robot Research.... 

418 

96 

37fi 

65 

111 



Page 

I'M 

189. 172 
..73 



i r I ■ 



■ ■■rib 



Luly Associates 
MFJ Enterprises — 
MFJ Entef prises, . . . 
MFJ Enterprises,... 
MHz Electronic*. - . . 
MLM Associates. . . 



a ■ m W 

,80,81 

■ ■ M I J fc 

121 
.......156^167 

132 



i 4 * ■ # * ' 



M Squared Engineering. . 93 

Mac 'dromes, inc. , , — 100 

Madison Electronic* Supply 49 

..... wj 
,...100 



........ 



45 

46 Maggiore Electronics. . 

139 Memphis Amateur Radio 



.......... 



52 

...157 
.3.105 
...171 
, . . 156 
.....61 

13 

..,.132 

.....Of 

.60 
,53 
132 



49 

51 

485 

50 

52 

308 



318 
412 
107 



'*■«¥#-»■ 



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83 

i ■ ■■ * ■ *m* 

120 
...117 
...112 



Micro Control Specialties 

Microiog...... 

Microlog. 

Microcrat! Corp.. . . 

Mid-Corn Electronics. 

J. W, Miller Dtv /Bell Industries 

11 is 

ii**t*-i*iif vi t( f««t#if 4#t *tt vl| vM 

HnifSQB ■ ....■■»-------- lui 

National Comm, Group. , . . 112, 148 

Nemai Elecironics. 82 

N on h Coast M icro wave, ..*...,. SB 

* Orbit Magaxine. ,,........ 116 

* P. C. Electronics. 35, 114 

113 Pacific One Corporation 39 

Paiomar Engineers 4, 133. 134 

P B Radio Service. .63 

Phillips Tech Electronics 154 

Pipo Communications 156 

Power Gain Systems. , , , . . . 91 

459 ORG Engineering , , , + . . , . 153 

60 Quasi Electronics 168 



404 
421 
300 

96 



Distributors. ....,.., 48 

S- G. Roscoe. .......*....,••... 3j 

SF Amateur Radio Service, 116 

Sceptor Comm.. Inc„ 58 

* 73 Magazine 
Books 

. . 46, 1Z7-129. 146, 150. 151. ,52 

Dealers Ad- 151 

Subscriptions..- 116, 152 

University Microfilms 152 

333 Sentry Mfg. Co.. ,..,..114 

Snerwood Engineering. . 
112 Sintec Co 

Skylane Products. 
4jo oKyiec .........,., r ..., — - 

309 Spacecoast Research Corp 

* Spectronlcs. Inc„ 149. 174 

68 Spectrum Communications 79 

436 Spectrum International, Inc- ... 116 

486 Standard Communications. 123 

30 Strux Corp.. 152 

69 Surplus Electronics Corp.. 154 

316 Telex Communications, Inc.. — 53 

481 Telex Communications. Inc . 

109 Tennessee Electronics. 

328 Texas Micromanics 

118 The Blacksburg Group, . , 

449 The Ham Shack. , 

57 The Tuned Antenna Co.. . 
76 Trac Electronics. 

104 Trionyx Industries, Inc 

08 Tufts Electronics. . . 

Universal Communications 



155 
156 
149 
156 



w m r t. v r 



.63 
....149 

17 

107,116 

67 

.67 

.... 26 

68,89 

59, 107 



1 Van Gordon Engineering 

478 Valor 

31 1 Vanguard Labs 

90 VoCom Products Corp. 



«■--»- 



117 

21 

315 

61 

397 

454 



RSE Ham&hack. 

R.W T D., Inc 

Radio Activity , 

Radio Amateur Callbook 1 Inc. 

Radio World. 

Radlokit. 



mm w ¥ H 4 ft + 



.., . M» It+^i'l.l**' 



■ ■■i«ft>il«hll + *l 



» i r r * 



113 
111 
.90 
117 
117 
116 



■ IB, J*» 

...133 
j * * 156 

302 W-S Engineering , 117, 148 

79 Wacom Products. 1 55 

103 Wahl Clipper Corp , 99 

We&sex Publishing Co 153 

108 Xitek Corp,. , , . . 148 

83 Yaesu Electronics Co.. . . Coy ill. 1 78 



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G£*4EFAL UCENSE STUDY GUIDE I 6 95 
GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO 

ANTENNAS . %M 94 

A GUIDE TO HAM RADtO. J 4 % 

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[ 



130 73 Magazine * April, 1982 




A fresh idea! 



Our new crop of tone equipment is the freshes! thing growing in the encoder/decoder 
field today. All fones are instantly programmable by setting a dip switch; no counter 
is required. Frequency accuracy is astonishing ±.1 Hz over all temperature extremes. 
Multiple tone frequency operation is a snap since the dip switch may be remoted. 
Our TS-32 encoder /decoder may be programmed for any of the 32 CTCSS tones. 
The SS-32 encode only model may be programmed for all 32 CTCSS tones plus 
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COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

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SS-32 $29.95, TS-32 $59.95 



— 



NEIV 



PRODUCTS ] 



DRAKE'S NEW TRANSCEIVER 
AND RECEIVER 

The R. L. Drake Company has 
announced new models of Us 
TR7 communications transceiv- 
er and R7 receiver. Features new 
to the TR7A include standard 
9-kHz receive selectivity for AM 
reception, 500-Hz crystal filter 
for CW reception, built-in noise 
blanker, improved lightning pro- 
tection, and a new phone-patch 
audio input. 

The new R7A receiver fea- 
tures a noise blanker, 500-Hz 
CW crystal filter, and 9-kHz AM 
selectivity. These units also in- 
terconnect to make a "twins" 
system, offering complete fre- 
quency flexibility and dual si- 
multaneous receive. The TR7A 
has a suggested price of $1699 
and the R7A lists for $1649. 

For more information, con- 
tact ft L Drake Company, 540 
Rtchard Street, Miamisburg OH 
45342; (51 3)-S6fr2421. 



SEVEN ELEMENT TRIBANOER 

A new tribander, the TH7DX, 
is now available from Hy-Gain. 
The TH7DX features a dual- 
driven element system that 
maintains a vswrof less than 2:1 
on ail bands including the entire 
10-meter band. The driven ele- 
ments utilize Hy-Gain's Hy-Q 
traps capable of handling power 
levels well in excess of the legal 
limit. These traps allow element 
lengths of 0.225 wavelength on 
10 meters, 0.203 wavelength on 
15 meters, and 0,185 wavelength 
on 20 meters. The dual-driven el- 
ements are fed directly with Hy- 
Gain's 50-Ohm BN-86 balun. 

Tests show average front-to- 
back ratios of 22 dB on 20 and 15 
meters, and 17 dB on 10 meters. 
The average half-power beam- 
width varies from 66 degrees on 
20 meters to 63 degrees on 10 
meters. With a turning radius of 
20 feet and the longest element 




31 feet, the antenna is no larger 
than the Hy-Gain TH6DXX. The 
TH7DX weighs 75 lbs +1 has 9.4 
square feet of wind surface 
area, and wind loading of 240 
lbs. at 80 mph. The TH7DX t com- 
plete with stainless steel hard- 
ware, balun, and boom-to-mast 
clamp, is priced at $499.95. 

Hy-Gain also has announced 
that kit model 392S is available 
to convert the older TH6DXX to a 
TH7DX configuration for a sug- 
gested net of $199.95. 

For more information on 
these products, contact Hy- 
Gain Division, Tefex Commune 
cations, 9600 Aidrich Ave, So. f 
Minneapolis MN 55420; (612)- 
884-4051. Reader Service num- 
ber 481 . 

INDUCTIVE MODEM 

MFJ Enterprises has in- 
troduced their new MFJ-1230 
originate/answer modem. The 
1230 uses an inductive coupling 
technique for receiving. This 
gives reliable data transfer by 
eliminating errors caused by 
room noise, vibration, and other 
acoustic-coupling problems. 

This Bell 103-compatible 
modem operates from to 300 
baud, features half- and full-du- 
plex operation, and is crystal- 
controlled for high stability. An 
Apple version that plugs into 
the game port (MFJ^1231) is 
also available, complete with 
software. 

The MFJ-1230 and MFJ-1231 
inductive-coupled modems are 
available for $129.95 and 
$139.95 respectively. 

For more information, con- 
tact MFJ Enterprises, 921 
Louisville Rd., Starkvilfe MS 
39759; (601)323-5869. Reader 
Service number 480. 



H-8 AND H/Z-89 PROGRAM 

MLM Associates now offers a 
Morse code transceiver pro- 
gram for Heath/Zenith H-8 and 
H/Z-89 owners interested in digi- 
tal communications. MLM 
Morse converts International 
Morse code from a receiver into 
an alphanumeric video display 
and changes characters typed 
at a terminal into the form 
needed to activate a transmitter 
or code-practice oscillator. Fea- 
tures include fast break-in CW 
operation, automatic switching 
between transmit and receive, 
and a split-screen display. 

The instruction manual gives 
details for building a CW-to- 
computer interface or you can 
use a RTTY modem. MLM also 
offers the MFJ-1200 computer 
interface. The software package 
sells for $29.95. A complete 
package including software, in- 
terface, and power supply is 

To order, or for more informa- 
tion, contact William S. Hafi, 
MLM Associates, 5621 Maple 
Heights Court, Pittsburgh PA 
15232; (412)-683-4742< Reader 
Service number 477, 

MICROPHONE EQUALIZER 

The first in a series of new 
products from Heil, Ltd., is their 
EG 200 Microphone Equalizer 
for speech applications with 
SSB and FM transmitters. The 
EQ 200 allows you to equalize 
your amateur station in a man- 
ner similar to the technique 
used by broadcast stations and 
recording studios. 

This battery-powered device 
measures 4" x 4 fT x 1-1/2' 1 and 
plugs into the microphone line. 
The three controls, mike gain, 
low-frequency adjust, and high- 
frequency adjust are set with 





The Drake TR7A transceiver (fop) and R7 receiver. 
132 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



The MFJ inductive-coupled modem. 



the aid of a second receiver or 
another station. Distortion level 
is 0.09%. Microphones of any 
impedance will work, but low- 
impedance microphones are 
recommended since they usual- 
ly offer better RFI protection. 
The EQ 200 costs $49.95. 

For more information, con- 
tact He//, Ltd., #2 Heii Dr,< 
Manssa IL 62257. Reader Ser- 
vice number 479, 

SURGE PROTECTORS 

Alpha Delta Communica- 
tions' Transi-Trap Surge Protec- 
tors are gas surge arresters de- 
signed to protect sensitive elec- 
tronic equipment from damage 
due to excessive voltages or cur 
rents generated by transient 
phenomena. The elements in 
the Arc-Plug™ cartridge are 
constructed of two metal elec- 
trodes hermetically sealed in a 
gas-filled ceramic cylinder. They 
perform as voltage-dependent 
switches which can reliably and 
repeatedly carry large currents 
for brief periods of time. 

Alpha Delta Transi-Trap Pro- 
tectors are designed for indoor 
installation at the rear of the 
equipment. If outdoor use is 
planned, it will be necessary to 
coat afl surfaces thoroughly 
with a good sealer. The Model 
R-T low-level protector is de- 
signed for use with solid-state 
receivers, transceivers, or 
transmitters that run up to 200 
Watts into 50 Ohms. It costs 
$29.95. The Model HV high- 
voltage protector is for use with 
linear amplifiers running up to 
two kW into 50 Ohms and sells 
for $32,95. 

For more details, contact 
Alpha Delta Communications, 
116A North Main St, Oenterviiie 
OH 45459; (513H35-4772. 
Reader Service number 476. 



CWTORTTY CONVERTER 

Kantronics is Introducing a 
RTTY send/receive device that 
converts CW from any keyer or 
keyboard into standard AFSK 
two-tone RTTY or two-tone CW 
ID. Mtcro-RTTY sends and 
receives at 60, 67, 75 T and 100 
wpm, plus 110-baud ASCIL 

Features include special CW 
characters for sending a line- 
return/carriage-feed character 
and a print attachment. Micro- 
RTTY receives any shift of RTTY 
and dispfays the message on a 
ten-character, 3/8"-high vac- 
uum-tube fluorescent display. 
The 2-1/2" x 5" x 5-1/2 T5 
package comes with a 9-volt dc 
power supply and has a sug- 
gested price of $299.95, 

For more details, contact 
Kantronics, 1202 E. 23rd Si, 
Lawrence KS 66044; (913h 
842-7745. 



POWER LINE INTERRUPTER 

Electronic Specialists now of- 
fers an automatic-reset ac 
power line interrupter. Should 
the ac line voltage be disrupted 
or exceed preset safety limits, 
the power interrupter discon- 
nects ac power from controlled 
apparatus. A 4-minute timer 
delay, followed by automatic 
reset, helps avoid wide voltage 
fluctuations. 

Intended to operate unattend- 
ed for long periods, the self- 
reset power interrupter also 
offers an optional voltage moni- 
tor. Connecting to the ac line 
with a standard 3-prong plug, 
the power interrupter can ac- 
commodate a 15-Ampere resis- 
tive load or a 10-Ampere induc- 
tive load. The Model PJ^SR^IS 
interrupter costs $185.95; the 
voltage monitor option costs 
$20.00 extra. 









Electronic Specialists' power line interrupter. 



For more information, con^ 
tact Electronic Specialists, 171 
South Main St., Natick MA 
01769; (617)655-1532. Reader 
Service number 482. 

MIKE STAND 

Your mobile microphone can 
now be turned into a base sta- 
tion unit with Valor Enterprises' 
new Big Ben mike stand. The 
Model 221 features a black 
finish and costs $5,90. A chrome 



version, Model 221C, is also 
available for $7.90. 

To order, or for more informa- 
tion, write to Valor Enterprises, 
West Milton OH 45383; 
(513)6984195. Reader Service 
number 478. 



COMPACT ANTENNA BALUNS 

Palomar Engineers is intro- 
ducing a new series of baluns. 
The Model PB series will match 



■V-T-- | .■ •:■■••■ 












Transi-Trap gas surge protectors, 



The Big Ben mike stand. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 13a 




Patomar Engineers* antenna batun. 



50-Ohm coaxial cable to 5G-, 75- f 
1«K 150*, 20CK 250*. 300*. 375-, 
450-, 600% or SOD-Ohm balanced 
antennas. They also can be 
used as matching transformers 
for various purposes. 

The Model PB series work at 
power levels to 350 Watts PEP 
and are 1-1/2" x 3/4" x 3/4" in 



size. They operate from 1.7 to 30 
MHz, are fully encapsulated, 
and have stainless steel hard- 
ware. The PB baluns sell for 
$14.95, 

For further information, con- 
tact Patomar Engineers, 1924*F 
W, Mission Rd. t Escondido CA 
92025; f7t4)-747-3343. 




Patomar Engineers' VLF converter. 



VLF CONVERTERS 

Palomar Engineers is in- 
troducing two new converters 
for the 10-500-kHz band. They 
add reception of weather, ship- 
to-shore CW traffic, RTTY T 
WWVB t navigation beacons. 
1750-meter no-license band, and 
European low-frequency broad- 
cast stations. 

Model VLF-A converts to 
3510-4000 kHz for use with ham 
receivers and transceivers. 
Model VLF-S converts to 



4010-4500 kHz for general- 
coverage shortwave receivers. 
With digital readout, the last 
three digits read frequency. 

The new converters feature 
antenna bypass when turned 
off, LED power indicator, and 
low-current, nine-volt dc opera- 
tion. The VLF-A and VLF-5 sell 
for $79.95. 

For further information, con- 
tact Patomar Engineers, 1924-F 
W. Mission Rd. f Escondido CA 
92025; (714^747-3343 



LETTERS 



ATV GOES MONTHLY 

Amateur Television Magazine 
has expanded publication to 12 
issues per year beginning with 
the March, 1982 t issue. Now in 
its 15th year of service to 
specialized communications 
operators, Amateur Television 
Magazine covers all modes of 
amateur television such as 
FSTV T NBTV t MSTV, and SSTV 
as well as coverage of FAX, 
RTTY, microwave, EME t 
satellites, CATV, and com- 
puters. 

it was Henry 8. Ruh KB9FO t 
former publisher of ATV, who 
petitioned the FCC to allow 
SSTV operation in the HF 
General Class phone segments. 
This proposal was adopted and 
is expected to become effective 
sometime in early 1982, giving a 
tremendous boost to SSTV ac- 
tivity. 

Mike Stone WBOQCD 
Publisher, ATV Magazine 

PO Box H 
Lowden IA 52255 

134 73 Magazine * April, 1962 



CHARLIE IS BORN 



] 



I just read ''Messages From 
Station Charlie/' which ap- 
peared In the January, 1982, 
issue of 73. It was well written 
and brought back many mem* 
ories, some pleasant and others 
Vd rather forget. Perhaps other 
readers may be interested in the 
genesis of "Charlie Tf — sta- 
tion 53a 

In September, 1942, I was 

assigned to the Office of 
Strategic Services <QSS), 
Washington DC. After indoc- 
trination, I was sent to London 
to confer with [Major General Sir 
GolinJ Gubbins and [Brigadier F. 
W\] Nichols of the British 
Special Operations Executive 
(SOE) with respect to the es- 
tablishment of an American sta- 
lion to supplement British sta- 
tions 53A and 53B. The original 
concept was that we would han^ 
die the agent circuits into Nor- 
way. The British would arrange 
for us to get the land required 



and would furnish Ministry of 
Works personnel to do the con- 
struction, and we would provide 
the equipment and manpower 

The first thing I did was to 
drive out London's Great West 
Road with a receiver, stopping 
here and there at likely-looking 
spots to check reception condi- 
tions. I saw a road leading up a 
hill and found myself In a farm 
worked by Italian prisoners. 
They doffed their caps and 
opened gates so I could reach 
the top of the hill where I found a 
very large flat area f with low 
noise level and good reception. 

Since throughout England all 
place-name signs had been re- 
moved from roads and railroad 
stations and buildings, I 
mapped my route from London 
to the site with the names of 
pubs (e.g„ Compleat Angler) so 
that I could identify where I had 
been when I got back to London! 

I am envious of the author's 
good fortune in meeting those 
former agents aboard the Grips- 
hotm, In my case, t met only one 
after the war, His name was 
Robert, and I spent a lovely 
evening with him and his mother 
at their home in Paris. 

G. L. Graveson K4JI 

COR, US NR (Ret) 
Plantation FL 



BINARY STIMULATION 



] 



I never write to editors, but 
had to make an exception in 
order to respond to your com- 
ments concerning CW In your 
January editorial, The concept 
of high-speed, computer-based 
radio communication is de- 
finitely an intriguing one, 
but I must observe that nothing 
matches Morse code for ver- 
satility or CW for simple rf 
communication. 

The average human mind, 
trained in the use of the code, 
can interpret the variations in a 
binary-state stimulus, deriving 
through that process the infor- 
mation being encoded by the 
sender. The sender can encode 
the vast range of human 
thought that has been or can be 
reduced to words of human lan- 
guage. I believe the develop- 
ment of the code to be one of 
mankind's most magnificent 
achievements. 

What do you suggest replac- 
ing it with? I know next to 
nothing about BASIC or other 
computer languages, but I do 
know enough to doubt that 
anyone can communicate with 
it using an rf oscillator keyed by 
touching a couple wires to* 



gather, as many hams have 
done at one time or another As 
an example of versatility of the 
type of binary system used for 
transmission, consider the feat 
of surreptitious communication 
pulled off by Jeremiah Denton 
when "interviewed" by his North 
Vietnamese captors: Using the 
code, he spelled out the word 
TORTURE using eyeblinks as 
the binary system. What com- 
puter language would offer such 
a possibility? 

I'm not sure that these com- 
ments constitute sufficient 
reason for the code to be re- 
tained as one of the hallmarks 
of the radio amateur, but radio 
amateurs are usually people 
who are intrigued by the notion 
of action at a distance. The idea 
of communication over vast dis- 
tances via an insensible me- 
dium is one of the things that 
"hooks" us on this hobby, and 
the code makes the medium 
useful with the teast moving 
parts, which I interpret as being 
efficient. I sincerely believe that 
it should not be replaced by a 
system which requires complex 
contrivances to access that 
medium. 

R.O. Barnum, D.M.D. 
Tahlequah OK 

Hi f Ray — it's good to hear from 
one of the "let's go back to 
smoke signals" crowd. I don't 
know what band you operate, 
Ray, but on most of the CW 
bands I listen to i do not hear a 
vast range of human though t be 
ing expressed, just the usual 
garbage of name, location, 
signal strength, my rig Is. . . and 
73. Ad infinitum. The code is 
merely a way to send char- 
acters, not thoughts- The 
characters . . . the same ones 
we use on our typewriters and 
that more and more hams are 
using for code generation (if 
you've noticed the ads for code- 
typing systems) . . . can be used 
to communicate words. The 
words eventually, in some 
cases, can be used to com- 
municate thought. No one 
wants to change that. But it was 
not my suggestion that 
amateurs stop using CW; that's 
a straw man of your construc- 
tion, I've suggested that we stop 
making newcomers hateCW by 
jamming it down their throats. 
/Ve tried to point out that 
anyone who thinks that the code 
test is keeping out undesir- 
ables is blind to what has hap- 
pened. — Wayne. 



TEETHING ON CW 



The first thing I turn to when 
73 Magazine arrives each month 
is "Never Say Die." In spite of 
your caustic comments about 
the FCC and QST, it makes good 
reading. 

Over the past few months 
you've bored me somewhat, 
talking about your business 
acumen, your contact with the 
avant-garde of amateurs, your 
DX operations, plus mis- 
cellaneous other achievements. 
Oh, and your dislike of CW. 

Wayne, I cut my teeth on CW 
in the early thirties when that 
band was only CW + I've con- 
tinued in my devotion to CW. 
Man, it's a language; you have to 
talk it to retain your ability. 1 was 
a Navy Radioman on CW during 
all of WWII. Early in my ham 
career I made one 75-meter 
phone contact. I had mike fright 
so bad that it wasn't until the 
early fifties that I got on phone 
again. Now I spend about 50% 
of my operating time on SSB. 

Being something of an under- 
achiever ham, I sincerely ap- 
preciate your fighting spirit, 
Wayne. As you requested, here 
are some thoughts about our 
hobby's social events, 

A repeater group has a 
monthly get-together with wives 
and children at a local 
restaurant. For each ham, it's an 
ego trip. And there are picture- 
takers and practical jokers. 
Some are neat; others are slobs. 
Some act educated; some don't. 
It's a strange cross-section of 
humanity, all united by the bond 
of amateur radio. This group 
conducts no business. The 
members simply accept the 
pleasure of each other's com- 
pany. The wife and I go as often 
as we can, 

I have been a member of my 
local club, the Shawnee 
Amateur Radio Club, for several 
years- The part of the meeting I 
always enjoy is the free discus- 
sion prior to the business 
meeting. This is the time t meet 
and enjoy personal contacts 
with the local hams. Business 
meetings are a drag. I'd prefer 
the nitty-gritty to be handled by 
the officers at another time. 

After the business session 
comes an "enlightening" talk by 
an uninformed member— or a 
slightly-askew slide presenta- 
tion that I fervently wish I had 
not stayed for. I stayed for one 
movie, obtained at considerable 



effort, which proved to be about 
15 or 20 years behind the times, 
Your suggestion for the "Show 
and Tell" presentation sounds 
like a real winner. I hope to see 
more of this. 

Another social event is the 
hamfest. Except for the horrible 
crush of Dayton, i always end up 
with good vibes from hamfests. 

About 25 years ago, I joined 
the Quarter Century Wireless 
Association and went to an out- 
ing at Greenfield Village near 
Detroit. My immediate reaction 
was claustrophobia. I had been 
captured in time many years 
hence. I wasn't ready for this. I 
am now a life member of QCWA. 
My wife and I attend occasional 
dinner meetings in Indianapolis, 
Another ego trip, but fun. 

Speaking of fun, the real fun 
of amateur radio is building <or 
buying) and getting on the air 
with what you have to com- 
municate with others of like per- 
suasion, talking with other 
hams, making new friends, and 
keeping in touch with old 
friends, on SSB, FM, CW, RTTY, 
ASCII, SSTV t ATV, OSCAR, or 
whatever comes down the pike. 
Long live ham radio! 

73 from ex~W9IDP, -W8HXA, 
-W5JYE, -W0QBF, W9MTR, and 
-W9LNX. 

Paul L Schmidt W9HD 
Bloomfield IN 

Paul, we ail had to cut our teeth 
on CW. There is nothing to be 
proud of for that; we had no 
other choice. If we can stop try- 
ing to use CW as a weapon to 
ward off peopie who want to be 
hams and value it as an art, as 
the real spirit of amateur radio, 
perhaps we can be proud of if 
then. Right now f'm ashamed of 
CW, for it has failed us utterly in 
keeping out the trash. I'm pro- 
CW for fun and keeping up the 
spirit of amateur radio . . . just 
let's stop turning prospective 
hams off it by using it as a 
weapon against them. You're 
right about business meetings 
being a drag , . . keep 'em out 
and let the club/executive com- 
mittee waste its hours on that 
bunk, — Wayne. 



CLIMB ON! 

After reading all the latest 
about the League, the plain 
language debate, and other 
such discouraging Issues, it 
was most refreshing to read the 
wonderful article by Scott 



Nelson W7KUF about their 
Mount McKinley expedition. It is 
really uplifting to read about the 
true functions of amateur radio 
in action. If not anything else, it 
will drive me to re-up with 13 to 
keep informed, join one of the 
many clubs around here, and 
volunteer for some of the ac- 
tivities for which the hobby used 
to be noted, Wayne, I know that 
throughout the years you have 
always championed the good 
cause, and sometimes I wonder 
where you get all the energy for 
all the work you do. Be assured 
that many of ham radio's "silent 
majority" are behind you 100% 
and your continued rallying will 
drag us out of the woodwork, 
like me. Have a great year! 

David R. Waters WA6AWZ 

San Jose CA 

/ feel better already. — Wayne, 



HOME-BREWING 



] 



Let me congratulate you on 
the "Home-Brew Contest," 
which is an excellent idea! The 
current economic woes of this 
country have made it all but im- 
possible for amateurs like my- 
self, who have a family to sup- 
port, to upgrade a station with 
new equipment. Kits and good 
used equipment also seem out 
of the question. The home-brew 
route provides an alternative to 
this problem. I would be able to 
purchase the components as I 
could afford them and learn a lot 
more about the state-of-the-art 
of amateur radio as well. 

I might add that your idea 
underscores what I feel is a 
growing indifference at the 
ARRL to the basic needs of the 
amateur While I will continue to 
remain a member of this orga- 
nization, I am not at all happy 
with the direction they are go- 
ing. An amateur who can barely 
afford to get on the low bands or 
two meters doesn't need arti- 
cles on how to track the moon, 
build a QRP rig in a sardine can, 
or build expensive accessories. 
Granted, they do publish an arti- 
cle on receiver construction or 
the like from time to time. And, 
granted, there are construction 
projects in the Handbook, but I 
find the construction details 
sketchy. This, coupled with the 
cost of the components, tends 
to scare me off. This leads me to 
a suggestion. 

As you publish home-brew 
projects, please consider the 
possibility of providing detailed 

73Magazine ■ April, 1982 135 



construction plans. By this. I 
mean a checklist construction 
guide simitar to the method 
used by the Heath Company. It 
would certainly give someone 
like me, who isn't much beyond 
the code-oscillator stage, the 
confidence to tackle something 
like building a receiver. 

Right now your business 
mind is probably rejecting this 
idea, figuring the cost in money 
and man hours that would be re- 
quired to write step* by* step in- 
structions, create illustrations, 
templates, etc. I agree that this 
would not be cheap. However, 
consider the possibility of pub- 
lishing the construction details 
a section at a time over several 
issues of the magazine. Such a 
continuing series would certain- 
ly encourage newsstand sales 
and subscriptions. The same 
artwork for the magazine series 
could also be adapted to your 
line of amateur publications. 

The bottom line, Mr, Green, is 
that you have an excellent op- 
portunity to make a lasting con- 
tribution to the needs of am- 
ateur radio, I would encourage 
you to weigh the possibilities of 
this idea as you make your 
publication plans for this con- 
test. 

A Shy W09 

First-rate idea. — Wayne. 

FUN, CHEAP, AND 



After reading all the "crank" 
letters in the January, 1982, 73, 1 
decided to write one of my own. 
First, I'd like to take issue with 
people who write in and say that 
amateur radio is a rich man's 
hobby. That's a silly statement. 



Today people pay $500 to $700 
for a color TV, $10 to $30 a 
month for cable charges, $25 for 
tickets to a bowl game or con- 
cert. Amateur radio is cheap 
entertainment when compared 
to these other diversions. A 
state-of-the-art transceiver can 
be bought for around $500, With 
a little care* those solid-state 
beauties will easily last ten 
years. If an amateur buys one of 
these rigs, operates twice a 
week, and brews a pot of coffee 
each night he operates, at the 
end of ten years he has spent 
more on the coffee than the rig. 
Even then, he could recover a 
good fraction of his investment 
by selling the used rig. (For ex- 
ample, check the prices for a 
used Heath HW-101 compared 
to the price for a new kit seven 
or eight years ago. That almost 
amounts to free entertainment J 

Next, I'd like to console the 
old-time tinkerers. Tubes are 
still available. They're cheap. 
They're functional. If you want 
to build old-time gear, do it, I've 
built a few tubeCW transmitters 
and have enjoyed the construc- 
tion and operation- Please do 
not yell about others using in* 
tegrated circuits and tran- 
sistors. The old-timers were 
working with state-of-the-art in 
1929, and in 1929 tubes were as 
mysterious as integrated cir- 
cuits are now (to anyone refus^ 
ing to learn), This is a hobby* 
after all. Relax. Read a little, 
learn a little, and enjoy a lot. 

Jim Owens 1 letter especially 
bothered me when he said that 
newcomers in amateur radio 
must mortgage their homes to 
buy gear Jim f take a new guy to 
a hamfest Some nice Novice 



HAM HELP 



I am a Novice who is in search 
of a working Heathkit RX-1 re- 
ceiver to complete my station. 
My income is limited so the 
price must be very reasonable. 

Fred Erickson KA1GGN 

106 G. St 
Turners Falls MA 01376 

] need help in obtaining a 
schematic diagram and manual 
for a Jackson Model CRO-2 os- 
cilloscope, manufactured by 

Jackson Electrical Instrument 
Co,, Dayton, Ohio. I would be 



happy to pay for duplication 
or I will copy and return your 
original. 

Adam J. Patarcity WB3LIQ 
47 Bald Cypress La. 
Levittown PA 19054 

I had a great response to my 
request for information on the 
Hallicrafters HT 41, published 
in the December, 1981, Ham 
Hetp, Thank you. 

Glenn Churchill KA2IOI 
Glens Falls NY 



gear (e.g., Heath's HW-16 with 
vfo, 90 Watts, and full break-in) 
can be had for less than $100. 
He doesn't have to sell his 
home, just carpooi for a month 
and save a few bucks. Jim could 
even buy such a rig as a spare 
and loan it to the truly destitute. 
When the beginner upgrades to 
a Technician license, he can 
pick up a rockbound two-meter 
rig for a similar price. By the 
time he makes General, he is no 
longer a newcomer. 

Lastly, I'd like to address the 
people who claim that they are 
technically oriented and that 
amateur radio magazines don't 
publish enough projects- Great! 
The next time you build a proj- 
ect, take notes, take pictures, 
write it up, and send it to 73. 
Share your ideas with other am- 
ateurs, and it will improve the 
journal you are criticizing. 

Amateur radio is fun, cheap, 
and exciting. If you don't think 
so, contribute your ideas and 
improve it. If you can't be 
bothered to improve or enjoy 
amateur radio, go to the Y and 
swim a few laps in the pool. It 
will be better tor your heart and 
for amateur radio. 

Bradley G. Mauger KB5QZ 
Greenbelt MO 



QSL VIA 



I am QSL Manager for the 
newly-licensed station VQ9JB 
on Diego Garcia. The operator. 
Jay Befort, will be there eight 
months and I will be handling all 
of his QSLs, Send your cards to 
477 Mose Drive, Biloxi MS 39532. 

Shari Runyan WD5BHP 

Biloxi MS 



LEGITIMATE? 



■■ 



] 



This is in reference to the 
remarks by Tim Daniel N6RK on 
cable TV radiation (Letters. 
January issue of 73). I am most 
interested, since I have a foot in 
each camp. 

As a CATV engineer. I resent 
his shotgun statement, 
"\ . . many CATV companies are 
reluctant to upset the apple 
cart, much less spend any 
money that would result in a 
reduction of short-term profits/' 
How many companies? Which 
ones? How do you know? What 
do you know about the CATV 
company's short-term profit? 

He says, "The idea of a 
legitimate amateur repeater 



shifting its frequency to accom- 
modate CATV does not appeal 
to me." I remind him that the 
CATV operation is also 'le- 
gitimate/' The idea, however, is 
to work together to find a solu- 
tion, not to hurl tenuously- 
founded accusations. What he 
fails to see (or chooses not to 
recognize) is an old ham prob- 
lem from way back; The CATV 
system can be well within FCC 
specs, i.e. T 20 uWrn at 144.25 
MHz, and still be copied by a 
good grade of ham receiver 
when the antenna is near the 
cable. Hams have been fighting 
this forever— talking into a 
neighbor's hi-fi, although their 
transmitters are well within FCC 
specs. The aim is to work with 
the neighbor to resolve the dif- 
ficulty. 

His final paragraph ", . .per- 
haps some high-power trans* 
missions on or about 145,25 
MHz will prompt action/' makes 
me cringe. Lynching would also 
prompt action, but that, too, is 
unworthy of the ham fraternity, 
From his letter, I see N8RK as an 
"I don't like it, so I'll jam it" men- 
tality. As a new ham, t must say 
he has a vastfy different attitude 
from the many Elmers who have 
helped me. 

Fred Stone KA5MBB 
San Angela TX 

Fred, you seem to have read on- 
iy part of my response, t urged 
everyone to be "firm but tact fur' 
when trying to solve the prob- 
lem. A cable system that meets 
the 20-uV/m rule is not "legit* 
imate" if it violates 76.613b: 
"The operator of a cable televi- 
sion system that causes in- 
terference shall promptly take 
appropriate measures to 
eliminate the harmful in- 
terference. "-N8RK. 



SK 



After 16 years as the W2 QSL 
Bureau Manager, I have decided 
to call it quits. The new bureau's 
address is North Jersey DX As- 
sociation, ARRL 2nd District 
QSL Bureau, PO Box 599 t Morris 
Plains NJ 07950. 

Joseph Painter W2BHM is the 
new manager effective January 
1, 1982. The card sorting will be 
supervised by Ron Levey K2AIO. 

The reason for giving up the 
job? I just celebrated my 81st 
birthday. 

Victor "Digger" Ulrich WA2DIG 

Haledon NJ 



136 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



RTTY LOOP 



Marc L Leavey, Af D, WA3AJR 
4006 Win lee Road 
Randattstown MD 21133 

Wayne is not overly fond of 
M April Fool' '-type articles. I men- 
tion this now because as I get in- 
to this months topic some of 
you are going to begin to wonder 
if this rs for real. 

What would you say to the 
following situation, which might 
be observed in my ham shack? I 
am sitting at the desk, tuning 
the receiver, looking for sta- 
tions. The speaker calls out with 
a male voice, "CQ CQ CO DE 
N3BRB." So far not very exciting 
sounding, is it? But what if I tell 
you that the station is transmit- 
ting on 3620 kHz and is on 
RTTY? Now I've got you I 

What is it that makes this 
possibte? A rather remarkable 
new device which turns plain 
text into speech. Unlike speech 
synthesizers which use pre- 
packaged vocabularies, this 
unit's abilities are not con- 
strained by such predetermi- 
nation. 

The unit is the Votrax Type *N 
Talk (TNT). Based on the Votrax 
SC-01 chip, this is probably the 
most capable speech syn- 
thesizer on the market. Let's 
take a look at this rather 
remarkable device and then con- 
sider how the RTTY-voice is 
possible. 

The Type *N Talk is a small, 
two-pound box that may be con* 

DATA IN 



IfiPtJT > 



I 



SUFFER 



TEXT TO 

SPEECH 

XlATE 



PSEND — — +ril 



OUTPUT 
QUEUE 



SPEECH 

tw*P 



AMPLIFIER 



nected to any computer or 
related device through an RS* 
232C link. Text to be spoken is 
sent to it in plain ASCII, using, 
for the most part, common spell- 
ing. The Type N Tafk contains a 
text-to-speech translation 
system that allows pronuncia- 
tion "by the rules" for normal 
English speech. 

The synthesizer is connected 
to the host computer {similarly 
to a modem or serial printer) 
through an RS-232C interface. A 
switch located on the rear panel 
allows selection of baud rates in 
the 75- to 960Obaud range. The 
"clear to send" (CTS) and "ready 
to send" (RTS) lines are used to 
inhibit transfer of data to the 
Type 'N Talk when the internal 
buffer is full However, users of 
systems which do not support 
these functions of the RS-232C 
interface may alter the feeding 
software to allow for sufficient 
delays to provide for buffer emp- 
tying. Speech is generated at a 
rate roughly equivalent to a 
110-baud ASCII transmission. 

Data sent to the Type 'N Talk 
is stored in an input buffer of 750 
characters. This is roughly one 
minute of speech. The need for 
utilization of the CTS-RTS lines 
becomes obvious when one 
realizes that at a data transfer 
rate of 1200 baud, this buffer will 
be filled in less than seven 
seconds, or under one second at 
9600 baud. 



}- 



1 ,__- »ECHO 



->DATA OUT 



son WARE 

COftTROLLEQ 

SWITCHES 



<l 



'HELLO' 



The contents of the input buf- 
fer are then submitted to an in- 
ternal text-to-speech translator 
which generates the phoneme 
equivalents of the text input. 
These phonemes may be re- 
covered from the Type 'N Talk 
for storage or further process- 
ing as ASCII character strings. 
Normally, the output of the 
translator is held in a 126-byte 
output queue, from which it 
passes to the SC-01 speech chip 
for processing. 

An internal amplifier is provid- 
ed which is capabfe of driving an 
8-Ohm speaker to an acceptable 
volume- Of course, the audio 
may also be recorded, sent over 
the telephone, or otherwise 
manipulated. 

All of this is remarkable 
enough, but the Type N Talk 
does not stop there. Software 
switches are provided, toggled 
with escape sequences, that 
allow the Type + N Talk to provide 
a variety of functions. For exam- 
ple, data sent to the Type *N Talk 
may be processed by the unit, 
passed down the line to the next 
RS-232G device in a chain, or 
both. The ASCII output may be 
either an echo of the input or a 
phonetic representation of it 
And the Type *N Talk can be 
disabled but rendered "trans- 
parent/" so that it can share an 
RS-232C line with a printer or 
other serial device. 

Several modes of operation 
also are provided for In the nor- 
mal mode, the character group 
"MARC," for example, is pro- 
nounced as my name. Unfor- 
tunately, sending "WA3AJR" 
results in a strange sound. 



ATTTf 111 




something like "wah thre hajr/' 
In order to allow pronunciation 
of letter groups, a CAPS mode is 
available. Here, groups of cap- 
ital letters, as a callsign. are 
spelled out, and lowercase text 
is pronounced. This allows a 
great deaJ of flexibility in han- 
dling the type of text we frequent- 
ly see in RTTY (see. there's one 
of those groups!}. 

The diagram in Fig, 1 is an at- 
tempt to show many of these 
functions and switches in a 
schematic form. It should be ob- 
vious that this is not a simple 
device, but through its complex- 
ity it makes operation straight- 
forward. 

But how about that RTTY pro- 
gram, I hear you asking? What I 
did was take a routine that 
receives Murray code and 
modify it to output not only to 
the screen but also to the Type 
'N Talk connected to the com- 
puter. I have also provided 
keyboard commands to switch 
from the CAPS ON mode to the 
CAPS OFF, so that the CQ is 
easily identified but the text in a 
message is pronounced rather 
than spelled. 

Fig. 2 is a flowchart for the 
program; the full source listing 
for 6800 computer will be here in 
RTTY Loop next month. 

Turning to the mailbox, we 
find a note from Don McAllister 
N7AVJ, in Cedar City UT, who is 
looking for RTTY programs to 
run on the new VIC-20 computer. 
This new entry from Com- 
modore, the folks who brought 
you the PET, uses the same 6502 
CPU that the Appleand KIM use. 
I suspect, therefore, that some- 





C C " T ) 



COHVf n T 
TO 
ASCII 



/PV7 PVT / 



/put out / 

[£ZJ 



Fig. t Block diagram of the Votrax Type W Talk. 



Fig. 2. Flowchart for voice RTTY software. 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 137 



one handy with 6502 code could 
adapt one of the many pub- 
lished RTTY programs originally 
designed for one of those to run 
on the VIC. 

Don also would like to try to 
put his Sinclair ZX-80 on RTTY, 
Now, there's a toughy! While 
this little gem uses a Z-SO t my 
sources tell me that external in- 
terfacing may be a bear. I don't 
have any ieady solutions for 
these problems, Don, If any 



readers do pass it along, we will 
share it with all of you, 

It* s not only the newer 
systems which keep us on our 
toes, though, Eiston Swanson 
W3PEE, in Locust Valley NY, 
has a CP/M-based system— I 
presume based on an 8080 
CPU— that he would like to put 
on the air on Murray code. 
Although he has modem drivers 
for ASCII work, he would like to 
have a similar Murray routine to 
allow file transfers and the like. 



There have been many RTTY 
programs published for various 
8080- and 2-80-based systems, 
Elston, and we included a list of 
the most recent ones in this col* 
umn a few months back. I sug- 
gest you look over some of 
those programs to see if you 
could not build a Murray driver 
into your modem program. That 
might give you the flexibility you 
desire without having to rein- 
vent the wheel. 

Of course, any readers who 



are running a GPfM-based Mur* 
ray system are encouraged to 
share the information with us 
all. I never cease to be amazed 
at the diversity of equipment be- 
ing used to communicate on 
this one common mode, RTTY, 
We started getting pretty 
diverse right here this month, 
what with a voice output for 
RTTY and all. The program and 
such will be next month's 
highlight, along with more sur- 
prises, all here in RTTY Loop. 



CONTESTS 




Robert Baker WB2GFB 
15 Windsor Dr. 
At co NJ 08004 

CW& RTTY WORLD 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 

CW Event: 0000 to 2400 GMT, 

April 3 

Phone Event: 0000 to 2400 GMT, 

April 4 

Sponsored jointly by ?3Mag& 
zine and the RTTY Journal. Use 
all bands, 10 through 80 meters, 
on the specified mode. Cross- 
mode contacts do not count. 
The same station may be worked 
once per mode. 

Operator classes are: a) 
single operalor. single trans- 
mitter, non-computerized; b) 
single operator, single transmit- 
ter, computerized; c) multi-oper- 
ator, single transmitter, non- 
computerized; and d) muliboper 
ator, single transmitter, comput- 
erized. Single operator stations 
may work 18 hours maximum 
per mode, while multi-operator 
stations may operate the entire 
24-hour period. Off times are no 
less than 30 minutes each and 
must be noted in logs. To be el* 
igible for the computerized 
class, your station must be in- 
terfaced with a microprocessor- 
controlled RTTY and/or CW op- 
erating system such as the 
TRS-80, Heath/Zenith. Apple, 
PET, OSI, Hal, etc. Utilizing a 

138 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



memory keyer for CW does not 
constitute a computerized 
station. 

Entry categories are: a) CW 
only, b) RTTY only, and c) CW 
and RTTY both. 

EXCHANGE: 

Stations within the 48 contig- 
uous United States and Canada 
must send RST and state, prov- 
ince, or territory. All others will 
send RST and a consecutive 
contact number. If your station 
is computerized r add the letter 
"C 1 ' to the end of your exchange. 

SCORING: 

Count 1 QSO point for each 
valid contact, An additional 
bonus point ts earned if the sta- 
tion worked is computerized and 
sent a "C 1 " at the end of his 
exchange. Count 1 multiplier 
point for each of the 48 contigu- 
ous United States and each 
Canadian provincetterritory and 
DX country (outside the contigu- 
ous US and Canada). The total 
claimed score is the total QSO 
points times the total multiplier 
points. 

AWARDS: 

Contest awards will be issued 
in each entry category and oper- 
ator class in each of the US call 
districts and Canadian provinc- 
es and territories, as well as in 
each DX country represented. 
Other awards may be issued at 
the discretion of the awards 
committee. A minimum of 5 
hours and 50 QSOs must be 
worked on a mode to be eligible 
for awards. 

ENTRIES: 

Entries must include a 
separate log for each event en- 



CALENDAR 



Apr 3-4 
Apr 1 0-1 1 
Apr 1M8 
Apr 24-25 
May 1*2 
May 15-17 
Jun 12-13 
Jun 12-13 
Jun 26-27 
Jul 10*11 
Jul 17 18 
Aug 7*8 
Aug 14-15 
Sep 11 12 
Sep 11 12 
Oct 1817 
Nov 6-7 
Nov 13-14 
Nov 20-21 
Dec 4*5 
Dec 11-12 



CW & RTTY World Championships 

CARF Phone Commonwealth Contest 

ARC1 QRP Spring QSO Party 

YL ISSB QSO Party- Phone 

County Hunters SSB Contest 

Michigan QSO Party 

ARRLVHF QSO Party 

Worldwide South America CW Contest 

ARRL Field Day 

IARU Radiosport 

International QRP Contest 

ARRL UHF Contest 

European DX Contest— CW 

ARRLVHF QSO Party 

European DX Contest— Phone 

ARC! QRP CW QSO Party 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

European DX Contest— RTTY 

ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 

ARRL 160-Meter Contest 

ARRL 10 Meter Contest 



tered, a dupe sheet, a summary 
sheet, a multiplier check list, 
and a list of equipment used for 
each mode of operation. Con- 
testants are asked to send an 
SASE to the contest address for 
official forms! 

Omission of the required en- 
try forms, operating in excess of 
legal power, manipulating scores 
or times to achieve a score ad- 
vantage, or failure to omit 
duplicate contacts which would 
reduce the overall score more 
than 2% are all grounds for im- 
mediate disqualification. 

Entries must be postmarked 
no later than May 10th and sent 
to: CW and RTTY Champion- 
ships, c/o The RTTY Journal, PO 
Box RY, Cardiff CA 92007. 



VS6 ACTIVITY DAYS 

Starts: 0001 GMT April 3 
Ends: 1700 GMT April 4 

As many VS6s as possible will 
be active during this time period 
with the sole purpose of giving 



as many QSOs as possible to 
other amateurs worldwide. This 
activity is not meant to be a con- 
test, but rather a weekend set 
aside to give DXers and awards 
chasers a chance at working rel* 
atively rare Hong Kong. The 
Hong Kong Amateur Radio 
Transmitting Society offers two 
very attractive awards, with the 
income from the awards helping 
to finance the VS6 QSL Bureau. 

The Nine Dragons Award: 
One QSO with a country in each 
of the following 9 zones— 18, 19. 
24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, and 30. The 
zone 24 QSO must be with a VS6 
station. Stations within the 9 
zones require 2 QSOs in each 
zone and 2 VS6s. QSOs after 
January 1, 1979, are accepted. 
Award fee is S3 US or 25 IRCs. 
Certified log extracts should be 
sent; please do not send QSLs 

Firecracker Award: Six QSOs 
with different VS6s. QSOs must 
be after January 1, 1964. Award 
fee is $2 US or 15 IRCs. Send 
certified log extracts. 



Applications for either award 
should be addressed to the 
Hong Kong Amateur Radio 
Transmitting Society (HARTS) f 
PO Box 541. Hong Kong. As 
many of their members have 
QSL managers, you are urged to 
QSL via the managers and not 
through the VS6 bureau if at ail 
possible! 

CARF PHONE 
COMMONWEALTH CONTEST 

Starts: 1200 GMT April 10 
Ends: 1200 GMT April 11 

All entrants may use the full 
24-hour contest period. All radio 
amateurs licensed to operate 
within the Commonwealth or 
British Mandated Territories are 
eligible to enter. Use SSB only 
on the 80- through 1 0-meter 
bands, Only one contact may be 
claimed with a specific station 
on any one band, and dupli- 
cate contacts must be clearly 
marked as such without claim 
for points. Contacts may be 
made with any station using a 
Commonwealth callsign except 
those within the entrant's own 
call area. UK stations may not 
work each other for points. 

EXCHANGE: 

A contact consists of an ex- 
change and acknowledgement 
of an RS report and a three- 
figure serial number starting at 
001 and increasing by one for 
each successive contact 
throughout the contest period. 
Do not send a separate series of 
serial numbers on each band. 

FREQUENCIES: 

3600* 3780, 7080, 14180, 
21200, 28480. 

SCORING: 

Each completed contact will 
score 5 points, In addition, a 
bonus of 20 points may be 
claimed for the first, second. 
and third contacts with each 
Commonwealth call area on 
each band. 

AWARDS: 

The CARF Phone Common- 
wealth Contest Plaque will be 
awarded to the top scoring entry 
in the multi-band class. Certifi- 
cates will be awarded to top 
scoring entrants in each class in 
each Commonwealth call area. 

ENTRIES: 

Separate logs are required for 
each band. Each band log 
should be separately totaled 
and should include a checklist 



ARIZONA 



W70N 




GEORGE ANDERSO 

12301 V, 68 PLACI 

SC0T7SDALE, AR 
85254 tf.S 



MARICOPA CO 




QSL OF THE MONTH: W70N 

W70N believes the best QSL is the simple QSL that instantly communicates a great deal about your 
station's location. The green saguaro cactus is the symbol of his Arizona QTH; it stands against a desert 
sand brown wood grain of desert pine. His cad fetters and address were chosen to be in a brown western 
font and placed off center to balance the image. The backside is filled out using brown ink to further the 
desert, dry, barren idea. 

If you would like to enter our contest, put your QSL card in an envelope and mail it, along with your 
choice of a book from 73's Radio Bookshop, to 73 Magazine, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 03458. Atten- 
tion: QSL of the Month. Entries which do not use an envelope (the Postal Service does occasionally 
damage cards) and do not specify a book will not be considered. 



of call areas worked on that 
band. Logs should include, for 
each contact: time in GMT T 
callsign of station worked, ex- 
change sent and received, 
points claimed. Separate band 
totals should be added together 
and total claimed score entered 
on a summary sheet. 

Entries may be multi-band or 
single-band. Single-band entries 
should show contacts for one 
band only. Only single-operator 
entries will be accepted. Single- 
operator entries are manned by 
one operator only who receives 
no assistance whatever during 
the contest period. Multi-band 
entries are not eligible for 
single-band awards. Each entry 
will consist of the separate band 
logs, call area checklists, a sum- 
mary sheet and dupe sheets. 
Entries should be addressed to; 
CARF Contests & Awards Com- 
mittee, PO Box 2172, Station D, 
Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 5W4 
Canada. Under no circum- 
stances should entries for the 
CARF Phone Commonwealth 
Contest be sent via the RSGB, 
nor should entries for RSGB's 
CW Contest be sent via CARF. 
The closing date for entries will 
be June 1st. Official summary 
sheets are available for an 
SASE, 



QRP ARCI SSB QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1200 GMT April 17 
Ends: 2400 GMT April 18 

Participants may operate a 
maximum of 24 hours during the 
contest period. Stations may be 
worked once per band for QSO 
and multiplier credits. 

EXCHANGE: 

Members— RS, state/prov- 
ince/country. and QRP number. 

Non-members— RST, state/ 
province/country, and power 
input. 

SCORING: 

Each member OSO counts 5 
points regardless of location. 
Each non-member US or Cana- 
dian contact counts 2 points. 
Non-members outside VWVE 
count 4 points. Multipliers are 
as follows: 8-10 Watts pep out- 
put— x 2, 6-8 Watts— x 4, 4-6 
Watts— x 6, 2-4 Watts— x 8, 
and less than 2 Watts— x 10. 

Stations running on more 
than 10 Watts pep output will 
count as check logs only. Bonus 
multiplier is x 2 if 100% natural 
power (solar, wind, etc.) with no 
storage or x 1.5 if 100% battery 
power. Final score is total QSO 
points times total number of 
states/provincesfcountries per 



band times the power multiplier 
times the bonus multiplier (if 
any). 

FREQUENCIES: 

1810, 3985, 7285 f 14285, 
21385, 28885, 50385, All plus or 
minus to clear interference. 
VHF/UHF contacts must be di- 
rect and not through a repeater. 

AWARDS: 

Certificates to the highest 
scoring station in each state, 
province, or country with two or 
more entries. Entries are auto- 
matically considered for annual 
Triple Crowns of QRP Award. 

LOGS& ENTRIES: 

Send large SASE to contest 

chairman for scoring summary 
sheet in advance of contest. 
Separate log sheets are sug- 
gested for each band for ease in 
scoring. Send full log data plus 
separate work sheet showing 
details and time(s) off air No log 
copies will be returned. All en- 
trants desiring results and 
scores please include a no.10 
envelope with enough US post- 
age for one ounce or an IRC. It is 
a condition of entry that the 
decision of the contest chair- 
man of QRP ARCI is final in case 

73 Magazine ■ April, 1982 139 




* ****** lf * 

***** ^Sitf* 3 

"*ii C*i***s^ &** 



QC* 



NEWSLETTER CONTEST WINNER 

This month's winner is published by the Metroplex Amateur 
Communications Association, a large repeater-oriented 
group based in northern New Jersey. Editor WA20VG is a 
commercial designer, and his influence clearly shows, The 
Metroptex newsletter is beautifully designed, with excellent 
layout and classy typography, A newsletter that looks good 
not only attracts readers, but also catches the eye of poten- 
tial advertisers, With over a page and a haJf of advertising in a 
six-page issue, Metroplex is able to cover a large percentage 
of the cost of the newsletter without undue drain on the club's 
treasury. 

The moral of the month Is: Utilize the talents of your 
members. If you have a printer, commercial artist, journalist, 
or photographer in your club, try to convince him to donate 
some of his time and talent to the cause. A club's greatest 
asset is its members— don't let their talents go to waste. 



of dispute. Logs must be re- 
ceived by May 20th. Logs re- 
ceived after that date or missing 
information will be used as 
check togs. Send logs and scor* 
ing information to: QHP ARC) 
Contest Chairman, William W. 
Dickerson WA2JOC, 352 Cramp- 
ton Drive* Monroe Ml 48161. 

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION 

Starts: 2400 GMT April 23 
Ends: 0600 GMT April 26 

A special events station will 
be operating from the Nebraska 
State Arbor Lodge, former home 
of J. Sterling Morton, founder of 
Arbor Day, in Nebraska City, 
Nebraska, during the annual Ar- 
bor Day Celebration. This sta- 
tion, in addition to other club 
member stations, will be 
operating m the General portion 
of the phone and CW bands on 
80 through 10 meters. All 
amateurs contacting this sta- 
tion or any other club member 
station during this time will be 
eligible to receive an Arbor Day 
commemorative certificate from 
the Nebraska City Amateur 
Radio Club. Please send one 
dollar and a business-size self- 
addressed envelope tor John A. 
Royal W0GRB, PO Box 146, 
Nehawka NE 68413. 

YL ISSB QSO PARTY— PHONE 

Starts: 0001 GMT April 24 
Ends: 2359 GMT April 25 

Two six^hour rest periods are 
required. Operating categories 
include: single operator, DX/WK 
teams, and YUOM teams. All 
bands will be used and the same 
station may be contacted on dif- 

140 73 Magazine ■ April. 1982 



ferent bands for contact points 
but not as country multipliers. 
Two meters may be used, but 
contacts must be direct and not 
through repeaters. 

EXCHANGE: 

Name, RS t SSBer number, 
country, state, and partner's 
call If no partner, leave blank 
If non-member T send "NO 
NUMBER/ 

SCORING: 

i 

Score five points for each 
member contacted on any con- 
tinent, Non-member contacts 
count one point. Only member 
station contacts count for multi- 
pliers. Multipliers are each 
state, country, and province, 
and also each team contacted, 
but only once for each team. 
When DX/WK partners contact 
each other, it counts as a double 
multiplier. Final score is sum of 
QSO points times the total 
multiplier. 

ENTRIES: 

Logs must show date/time 
(GMT), RS, SSBer number, part* 
ner's call t mode of operation, 
band, and period of rest time. 
Summary sheets show number 
of states, Canadian provinces, 
countries, YUOM teams, DX/WK 
teams, and partner contacts. 
Send logs, summary sheets, and 
completed YL ISSB QSO Party 
applications to Minnie Connolly 
KA0ALX, Star Rt. #1, Crocker 
MO 65452. Anyone needing 
blank forms or additional infor- 
mation, send an SASE to the 
above address. 



RESULTS 

RESULTS OF THE 

1981 CARF PHONE 

COMMONWEALTH CONTEST 



Class 


Callsign 


Score 


QSOs 


Bonus 


Place 


A 


VE1ASJ 


6360 


ryuk 


182 


1 


A 


G3FXB 


5740 


448 


175 


2 


■T^ 


VE5RA 


5730 


482 


166 


3 


A 


VE3GCO 


5180 


396 


160 


4 


A 


VP2VGR 


4130 


390 


109 


5 


A 


VE5BBD 


2915 


227 


89 


6 


A 


G4APL 


2465 


129 


9T 


7 


A 


VE2ZP 


2395 


139 


85 


6 


A 


VK7BC 


2245 


113 


84 


9 


A 


VK6FS 


2160 


136 


79 


10 


A 


VE3UD 


1685 


117 


55 


11 


A 


VE4RP 


1375 


103 


43 


12 


A 


G3ZRL 


815 


59 


26 


13 


A 


VE3KFZ 

(op. VE3HWS) 


605 


30 


23 


14 


A 


VE3GWM 


305 


13 


12 


15 


14 


VE3KKB 


1440 


96 


48 


1 


14 


GW3MPB 


390 


18 


15 


2 



How the leaders made their scores: OSOs versus bonus point 
QSOs broken down by band. 



Band 



3.5 



14 



21 



26 MHz 



VE1ASJ 


13/12 


26/14 


83/47 


110/41 


312/68 


G3FXB 


4/4 


16/12 


155/61 


140/51 


133/47 


VE5RA 


1/1 


30/25 


120/52 


80/29 


251/59 


VE3GGO 


7/6 


15/15 


195/67 


54/25 


125/47 


VP2VGR 


— fi 


— 


115/39 


53/28 


222/42 



COUNTY HUNTERS 
SSB CONTEST 

Contest Periods: 

0001 to 0800 GMT May 1 

1200 GMT May 1 to 

0600 GMT May 2 

1200 to 2400 GMT May 2 

Please note the two 4-hour 
rest periods. 

Mobiles may be worked each 
time they change counties or 
bands, Mobiles that are worked 
again from the same county on 
a different band count for point 
credit only; Mobiles that are 
contacted on a county line 
count as one contact but 2 mul- 
tipliers. Fixed stations may be 
worked by other fixed stations 
only once during the contest. 
Repeat QSOs between fixed sta* 
tions on other bands are not per- 
mitted. Fixed stations may be 
worked by mobiles each time 
they change counties or bands. 
Repeat contacts between mo- 
biles are permitted provided 
they are on a different band or 
county. Mixed mode contacts 
are permitted provided that one 
station is on SSB, Contacts 



made on net frequencies will not 
be allowed for scoring in this 
year's contest. 

EXCHANGE: 

Signal report, county, and 
state or country. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Suggested frequencies are as 
follows: 3920-3940, 7220-7240, 
14275-14295, 21375-21395. 
28625-28650. 

There will be a "Mobile Win- 
dow" of 10 kHz on the following 
frequencies: 3925-3935, 7225- 
7235. 14280-14290. Mobiles will 
be in this 10-kHz segment and 
fixed stations are asked to 
refrain from calling M CQ CON- 
TEST' in the mobile window. 
After working mobiles in the 
window t fixed stations are re- 
quested to QSY outside the win- 
dow to work fixed stations in the 
contest. This will allow the 
mobiles running lower power a 
chance to be heard and worked 
in the contest. There wilt be a 
special effort to work DX on 
28.636 by mobiles. 



SCORING: 

Contact with a fixed US or 
Canadian station = 1 point. 
Contact with a DX station (KL7 
and KH6 count as DX) = 5 
points. Mobile contacts = 15 
points. MuJliplier = total US 
counties + Canadian stations. 
Score = multiplier x total QSO 
points. 



AWARDS; 

MARAC plaques to the 
highest scoring fixed US or 
Canadian station, DX station, 
and 2 top-scoring mobile sta- 
tions. Certificates to the top 10 
fixed and mobile stations in the 
US and Canada and to the 
highest scoring station in each 
DX country. 



ENTRIES: 

Logs must show date and 
time, station worked, reports ex- 
changed, county, state, band t 
claimed QSO points (1,5, or 15), 
and each new multiplier must be 
numbered. Logs and summary 
sheets are free for a #10 SASE or 
SAE and appropriate IRCs. 
Write to: John Ferguson 



W0QW3, 3820 Stonewall Ct, ln^ 
dependence MO 64055. 

All entries must be received 
by June 15th to be eligible for 
awards. DX entries should use 
air maiL Winners will be an- 
nounced at the 1982 Indepen- 
dent County Hunters Conven- 
tion during July and in the 
MARAC Newsletter. 



AWARDS 




Biff Gosney KE7C 
Micro-80, inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 96277 

NOVICES TO NOVICE 

Novices* take heart — here is a 
mini-expedition for you! Begin- 
ning April 17th at 1800 Zulu and 
continuing until 1800 Zulu on 
the 18th, the North Texas Hfgh- 
Frequency Association will be 
operating the Novice bands 
from Novice, Texas. Look for the 
mini-expedition about the cen- 
ter of the Novice bands, signing 
the call KC5YN (Young Novice). 
Operators will work your calling 
speed (if you're not too fast), so 
don't worry about calling. A 
commemorative QSL will be 
issued to all stations worked 
who send a legal-sized SASE. 

The NTH FA is the same group 
that brought you "Phone From 
Telephone, Texas/' the ''Alter- 
nate Olympics" from Moscow, 
Texas, and the annual mini- 
expedition from the decks of the 
Battleship Texas, moored in the 
Houston ship channel 

We look forward to working 
you, Novice or not, from Novice, 
Texas; remember to "Keep Call- 
ing Five Young Novices." 

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND 
TELETYPE GROUP AWARD 

This award is open to all 
transmitting and listening 
amateurs. Australian amateurs 
must score 5 points; overseas 
amateurs must score 3 points. 

To qualify, a station must, 
where possible, copy the official 
station of the South East 
Queensland Teletype Group, 
VK4TTY, during a news broad- 
cast, and, in the case of a 
transmitting amateur, par- 
ticipate in the call-back {2 
points). A portion of the printout 
of the news broadcast together 



with the date, time, frequency, 
and broadcast number are to ac- 
company the request for the 
award. 

Additionally, a transmitting 
amateur must work three 
member stations of the SEQTG 
on RTTY (1 point each). Log ex^ 
tracts and/or printouts are to be 
included with the award applica- 
tion, and each member station 
may be counted only once to* 
wards the award. 

Listening amateurs should, in 
lieu of (b), forward log extracts 
and/or printouts of three con- 
tacts involving different 
member stations of the SEQTQ 
(1 point each). 

Applicants for the award 
should forward the above infor- 
mation together with one dollar 
Australian or 5 IRCs to cover 
postage and printing costs, to: 



the Secretary, SEQTG, PO Box 
184, Fortitude Valley, QLD 4006, 
Australia. 

MARCCO AWARDS 

The Mobile Amateur Radio 
Club of Colorado (MARCCO) is 
an organization of licensed 
amateur radio operators who 
engage in HF mobile opera- 
tions. Meetings are held at noon 
on the first Friday of every 
month at Wyatfs Cafeteria, 
Cherry Creek Shopping Center, 
Denver. Visiting rnobilers are in- 
vited to attend the monthly 
meetings whenever they are in 
Denver. 

Current MARCCO officers are 
J.D. Jones WB0BNP t president, 
Rich High WQHEP, vice presi- 
dent and awards chairman, Paul 
R Hultquist WB0SEQ, secre- 
tary/treasurer, and John S. 
Seale, Jr. KD0U, nominating 
committee chairman. 

MARCCO has established 
several awards effective 
January 1, 1981. Among them 
are: 

• WACCO Award— Worked mo- 
biles in all Colorado counties. 



• Borderto-Border and Coast- 
to-Coast Awards — Worked mo- 
biles in an unbroken string of 
counties from Canada to Mex- 
ico or from the At I antic Ocean to 
the Pacific Ocean. Any string 
must contain at least three Col- 
orado counties. 

• WAMTZ Award— Worked mo- 
biles in all counties in the Moun- 
tain Time Zone. 

As a gesture of respect and 
affection for the late Bing Miller 
W0GV T a charter member of 
MARCCO, the club will continue 
the Worked All Bingo award he 
established for working in all 
Colorado counties. It will be call- 
ed the WQGV Memorial Award 
and will be given for working the 
same mobile in each of the 63 
Colorado counties. Persons 
who already have worked Bing 
in one or more Colorado coun- 
ties, regardless of date, may 
combine these contacts with 
those obtained from any other 
single mobile In the remaining 
counties to qualify for the 
award. 

Log information is sufficient 
for all MARCCO awards. 



E3 



9N&l£.' DOUBLE 









netful cannot 



The South 



GARAGE 



iletym .Group 




El 

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1 

Li) 

a 
p 

73 Magazine • April, 1982 141 



RMELE„ 



*ftt^ STOP K t C K AM1.W3 



KEVBGdftD 



For more information con- 
ceming awards, contact Rich 
High W0HEP T MARCCO Awards 
Chairman, 451 East 58th Avenue 
239B, Denver CO 80216; 
telephone (303^-595-9286. 

WORKED ITALIAN 
ISLANDS AWARD 

The WHA t formerly issued by 
the DX Old Timers Club 
(DXOTG), was discontinued 
when the club ceased its activi- 
ty. The award has now been 
resumed by ARL The new award 
series will start with num- 
ber 101. 

Scope: The award is issued in 
order to promote activity from 
islands belonging to Italy and. 
especially, from minor islands. 

Mode: The award will be 
issued for 2xCW, 2xSSB, and 



2xRTTY. No cross modes or 
mixed modes are allowed. The 
award is also available for SWL 
with no mode restrictions. 

Bands: Contacts (or heards) 
can be made on any band be- 
tween 3,5 and 29.7 MHz, in- 
cluding those allocated by 
WARC 79 as soon as they are 
officially allowed in Italy. 

Validity: Contacts (or heards) 
made on January 1, 1982, or 
after will count for this award. 

Contacts: The award will be 
issued for contacts (or heards) 
with not fewer than 10 islands or 
island groups according to the 
following list: Tuscan Ar- 
chipelago IAS* Ponziane Islands 
IBd t Neapolitan Archipelago 
IC8, Eolie (or Lipari) Islands ID9, 
Island of Ustica IE9 t Egadi 
Islands IF9 t Pelagic Islands 



(Lampedusa, etc.) IG9, Island of 
Pantelleria IH9 f Cheradi Islands 
IJ7 T Tremiti Islands IL7 t Minor 
Islands surrounding the Island 
of Sardinia IMQ, Sardinia Island 
ISO, Sicily Island IT9. for a total 
of 13. A special endorsement 
will be mentioned in the award if 
all 13 islands are contacted (or 
heard). 

In order to be credited for the 
award, contacts (or heards) 
shall be made with stations per- 
manently located on an island 
or island group. Credit also will 
be given for contacts (or heards) 
made with stations operating 
temporarily from such loca- 
tions. These stations shall iden- 
tify themselves by using their 
regular call followed by the 
prefix assigned to that specific 
island or island group. 



Application: Applications 
shall include all data regarding 
contacts (or heards) made. Ap- 
plicant's name and address 
should be in block letters and 
should be forwarded with OSLs 
or other type of written con- 
firmation of the contacts (or 
heards) made together with 3 US 
dollars or 10 IRCs to: ARl Award 
Manager. G. Nucciotti 18KDB. 
Via Francanzano 31, 80127 
Napoli, Italy. 

GCR will not be accepted. 

PONY EXPRESS DAY 

The Missouri Valley Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its third an- 
nual Pony Express Day on April 
10, 1982, from 1000 to 1900 GST. 
The event commemorates the 
original running of the Pony Ex- 



97 WD60FN 
100 N6BDI 
103 K9GHP 
106 WBHTM 
109 K3STM 
112 ZS6ABA 

115 VElACK 

116 HC2RG 



154 WD6FDN 
157 K8BDI 

160 WA2WRD 
163 W7HAZ 
166 WA9AMZ 
169 KG9Q 
172 WB0CHS 
175 AL70 
178 VE3MAM 

161 AG7P 
184 N6ATS 
187 N3ALL 
190 OE22Q7101 
193 N3AKQ 
196 AK0G 

199 wevuz 

202 KA2MIM 
206 PY3BTR 
208 KA5BOM 
211 VK2NHV 



73 MAG AZ tHE AWARDS PROGRAM 

Wort the World Award 

98 KN4F 
101 WBSNOV 
104 W0YBV 
107 N6ATS 
110 9G1RT 
113 VKZHO 
116 PY2BTR 
119 WA9IVU 

North American Award 

155 KOUKO 
158 K3WUR 
161 KN4F 
164 WB4PHW 
167 WB9NOV 
170 K9GHP 
173 KA7GIN 
176 DFH-1000742 
179 WA1UDH 
182 WA8KMK 
185 WD4JEQ 
188 WNBGUE 
191 KABJHD 
194 9G1HT 
197 OK-DR1239 
200 VK2HD 
203 VE3JPJ 
206 VE1ACK 
209 KBSWJ 
212 KC3W 



99 WA2WRD 
102 KA3DBN 
106 KA7GIN 
108 KC5TK 
111 WA2LYF 
114 VE3LVN 
117 VE3JPJ 
120 VK2NHV 



166 W8UMP 
159 WB8PRK 
162 KA3FUU 
16S WA9IVU 
168 AK5G 
171 WB7WQS 
174 W8HTM 
177 KB2WH 
180 KA1UA 
183 K9IML 
186 K3STM 
189 0A1AS 
192 WD9IBM 
195 KL7IS0 
198 ZS6ABA 
201 HC2RG 
204 SV1QJ 
207 VE3LVN 
210 WD0EPV 



115 K8BDI 
118 KA308N 
121 W*YBV 
124 AI70 
127 K3STM 
130 VK2KEW 
133 WA2LYF 
136 WA9IVU 
139 HC2RG 



120 WD6FDN 
123 K3WUR 
126 DFH 1000742 
129 WB9NQV 
132 OE2-207181 
135 W8HTM 
138 KA1UA 
141 K3STM 
144 N3ALL 
147 OK-DR1239 
150 VK2HD 
153 VE3JPJ 
156 VE1ACK 
159 VK2NHV 



176 OE2207161 
179 KA9ENM 
182 K3WUR 
185 WA2WRD 
188 W7HAZ 
191 W9NTU 
194 W99NOV 
197 WB7WOB 



116 K&GHP 
119 W7HAZ 
122 W8HT1W 
125 N6ATS 
T28 W&VUZ 
131 OKDR1239 
134 VE3LVN 
137 PY2BTR 
140 VK2H0 

African Award 

121 N8SDI 
124 WA2WRD 
127 KA3FUU 
130 K9GHP 
133 KC5TK 
136 K9IML 
139 N6ATS 
142 OE6CTG 
145 WA6KMK 
148 ZS6ABA 
151 HC2RG 
154 PY2BTR 
157 VE3LVN 



European Award 

177 WD6DFN 
1B0 W8UMP 
183 WB8PRK 
1B6 KN4F 
1B9 WB9PMW 
192 WA9IVU 
1 95 AK5G 
198 W9CC 



117 WB9NOV 
120 KA3FUU 
123KA7GIN 
126 KCSTK 
129 ZSGABA 
132 9G1RT 
135 VE1ACK 
138 VE3JPJ 
141 VK2NHV 



122 W1SIX 
125 KN4F 
128 WA9IVU 
131 WB3BVL 
134 KA7GIN 
137 WQYBV 
140 WD4JEQ 
143 PY2RHL 
146 9G1RT 
149 W8VUZ 
152 8P60V 
155 KB2WH 
158 KC4YY 



178 OFH-10QO742 
181 NBBOI 
184 WB9KUV 
187 KA3FUU 
190 W9NTU 
193 KA6EBE 
196 K9GHP 
199 KB2WH 





South American Award 




200 KL7NX 


201 A!70 


202 VE7ADA 


137 WD6DFN 


138 KN4F 


139 WA2WRD 


203 KG90 


204 KA7GIN 


205 W&HTM 


140 W&8PRK 


141 K3WUR 


142 N8BDI 


206 WA1U0H 


207 KA1UA 


208 KA2JDP 


143 WB7WOB 


144 K9GHP 


145 AK5G 


209 PY10WM 


210 AG7P 


211 WA8KMK 


146 WB9NOV 


147 WA9IVU 


148 W7HAZ 


212 OZ5EOR 


213 WD9INF 


214 KH60RT 


149 KA3FUU 


150 W8HTM 


151 KA7GIN 


215 PY3CJS 


216 N6ATS 


217 4Z4VG 


152 KG90 


153 WD4JEO 


154 N6ATS 


218 N8CJF 


219 WD4JEQ 


220 rOSTM 


155 K9IML 


156 WA8KMK 


157 AG7P 


221 N3ALL 


222 PY2RAN 


223 PY2RHL 


158 PY1DWM 


159 WA1UDH 


160 N3AKQ 


224 PY2JTO 


225 PY2DJC 


226 DAI AS 


161 KAflJHD 


162 PY2TTV 


163 PY2RHL 


227 KA2JJK 


228 DU1CPL 


229 PY2TTV 


164 N3ALL 


165 K3STM 


166 W09IBM 


230 KABJHD 


231 W09I&M 


232 9G1RT 


167 W8VU2 


168 ZS6ABA 


169 AK0G 


233 PY1EWN 


234 KL71SO 


235 AK9G 


170 KL71SO 


171 9G1RT 


172 VE3LVN 


236 OKOR1239 


237 VK2KEW 


238 2S6ABA 


173 VE1ACK 


174 AL70 


175 KB2WH 


239 W8VU2 


240 VK2HD 


241 HC2RG 


176 PY2BTR 


177 RY2AJK 


178 SV1GJ 


242 KA2MIM 


243 PY1BVY 


244 VE3JPJ 


179 VE3JPJ 


180 KA2MJM 


181 HC2RG 


245 PY2AJK 


246 PY2BTH 


247 VE1ACK 


182 VK2H0 


183 KC3W 


184 WDtAVG 


248 VE3LVN 


249 KC3W 


250 VK3NHV 


185 VK2NHV 








Oceanic Award 






Allan Award 




108 W06F0N 


109 KN4F 


110 WA2WRO 


109 W06F0N 


110 OE2 207181 


111 DFH-1000742 


111 N8BDI 


112 AK1H 


113 K9GHP 


112 KMF 


113 WA2WRD 


114 K3WUR 


114 AK5G 


115 WB9NQV 


116 DF9ZP 



142 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



press from St. Joseph, Missouri, 
to Sacramento, California. This 
year the Club also will help the 
City of St Joseph celebrate the 
100th anniversary of the death 
of the outlaw Jesse James. This 
will be accomplished by offering 
along with the Pony Express cer- 
tificate a wanted poster of Jesse 
James. 

Anyone making contact with 
the Club station, WQNH, is eligi- 
ble to receive both certificates. 
The operating frequencies will 
be 10 kHz from the bottom of the 
Genera J phone bands on 15, 20, 
40, and 75 meters. On 10 meters, 
the frequency will be 28.575. The 
CW bands will be 28.150 on 10 
meters, 21 .1 50 on 1 5 meters, and 
7,125 on 40 meters. 

All that is necessary to 
receive both certificates is to 



send two first class postage 
stamps and a QSL card to the 
Missouri Valley Amateur Radio 
Club, 401 N. 12th Street, St. 
Joseph MO 64501. 

ALGOA BRANCH AWARD 

This award is available free of 
charge to amateurs throughout 
the world. 

Amateurs outside zone 38 
must make at least ten contacts 
with Algoa Branch members on 
at least three different bands. 
Only one contact per branch 
member per band will count. A 
sticker for each extra band will 
be supplied on application, with 
proof of contact All contacts 
must be made subsequent to 
the formation of the Algoa 
Branch on April 14, 1979. 



A copy of the log or full details 
of contacts must accompany 
the application to: The Awards 
Manager t Algoa Branch Award, 
PO Box 10050 T Port Elizabeth 
6015, Republic of South Africa. 

Algoa Branch members are 
as follows; those with the 
asterisk are members known to 
be active on the DX bands. 



ZS2AP 


•ZS2JS 


*ZS2RB 


2S2AR 


ZS2KU 


ZS2RG 


ZS2BE 


ZS2LM 


ZS2RH 


•2S2BS 


ZS2LN 


•ZS2RN 


*2S2C 


ZS2MD 


ZS2RR 


ZS2CC 


ZS2MF 


*ZS2SI 


*ZS2DJ 


•ZS2MG 


*ZS2SP 


'ZS2DK 


'ZS2NC 


*ZS2U 


VS2EK 


ZS2NH 


ZS2UI 


*ZS2HU 


ZS20C 


ZS2W 


ZS2JC 


ZS20D 


'ZS2WG 


ZS2JE 







U.S.S. NORTH CAROLINA 

The Azalea Coast Amateur 
Radio Club will be operating 
from the battleship U.S.S. North 
Carolina, Wilmington NC, on 
April 17 and 18 from 0630 to 1800 
EST. The operating frequencies 
will be 25 kHz up from the lower 
edge of the General class phone 
band. 

Please OSL to the Azalea 
Coast Amateur Radio Club 
(W040RA), PO Box 4044, Wil- 
mington NC 28406, and include 
an SASE. 

ALAMO DXPEDITION 

The Border Amateur Radio 
Society and the Uvalde Radio 
Club will hold their annual 
Alamo Village DXpeditfon on the 
weekend of April 17>18. W5LFG 
will be working all bands on 






117 KA3DBN 
T20 KA7GIN 
t23 AL70 
126 WA9VU 
129 KH6DRT 
132 K3STM 
135 KL7ISO 
138 VE1ACK 
141 WB6SZZ 
144 VK2KHV 



75 W06FDN 
78 KN4F('80) 
61 K9IWL 
04 N6ATS 
87 VK2HD(79) 
90 9G1RT 
93 VK2NHV 



1 AA8Z 
4 WDSMAS 
7 W82FFY 
10 WB9UIA 
13 VE1ACK 



12 WA2SRM 

15 VK6YL 

IB N6ATS 
21 SV1GJ 



1 WB4WRE/M 
4 WOtAVQ 
7 WDSJRO 
10 WB9WFZ 



1T8 W7HAZ 
12! W0Y0V 
124 KC5TK 
127 N6ATS 
130 AG7P 
133 2SCA6A 
136 9G1RT 
139 PY2BTR 
142 HC2RG 



DX Country Club Award 

2 x SS& 
76 SP60V 
79 WA9IVU 
B2 AG7P 
85 KE7C 
88 VK2HD 180} 
91 SVtGJ 
94 CT2CQ 

2xGW 

2 W7ULC 

5 WB7PKD 

8 WB3BVL 
11 VE1BWP 
T4 KC3W 

OX Capitals of Iht World 

13 WA2YEX 
1G OE8MOK 
19 VK2HD 
22 VE1ACK 

10- Met or DX Decade Award 

2 AC3Q 
5 DA2AL 
S WA4ZLZ 
11 W8AKS/6 

Specialty Communications Award 
Class A— Work Ait States 



1 WA6VGS (Via OSCAR 8 Satellite) 

2 KE7C (Via RTTY) 



Class At— Over 70 DX Countries 



1 W20DA 


{RTTY) 


2 WBflQCD 


(SSTV) 


3 WB7BFK 


{RTTY) 


4 WBflQCD 


(RTTY) 


5 WD9QPI 


(RTTY) 


8 WB6CDM 


(RTTY) 


7 N3AKO 


(RTTY} 


8 DU1EFZ 


{RTTY) 


9 K3WUR 


(RTTY) 


10 WB2VTD 


(RTTY) 


11 PY3CJS 


(RTTY) 


12 KE7C 


(RTTYJ 


13 AL70 


(RTTY) 


14 PY1EWN 


(RTTYI 


15 OE1P6A 


(RTTY) 







119 W8HTM 
122 K9IML 
126 W04JEQ 
128 KH6JJC 
131 OE2-20718! 
134 VK3KEW 
137 VE3LVN 
140 VE3JPJ 
143 VK2HD 



77 KN4F(79) 
00 W7HA2 
83 KA1UA 
86 KA3FUU 
89 VK2HDC81) 
92 WA8KMK 
95 HC2RG 



3 SM5AKT 
6 W&YBV 
9 WB9LMA 
12 KA2EAO 



14 DF70Q 
17 BP60V 
2D ZS6ABA 



3 W5TJQ 

8 WS4TZA 

9 WB8LSV 
12 KA3FUU 







Worked All USA Award 










Mixed Band 






54 N7CPE 




55 KA3GSN 




56 KA3FUU 


57 KA4VNS 




58 AG7P 




59 NSCJF 


60 KA5EEZ 




61 KA7JNP 




62 WA9IVU 


63 6P60V 




64 KA7CP2 




66 AK0G 


66 VE3JPJ 




67 HC2RG 




68 KAfcTTT 


69 KA2MIM 




6 Meters 






1 WB0ZKG 




2 K6PHE 




3 N4BJJ 


4 KA5QDE 




5 WB5SND 




6 K3MFV 


7 N4QH 




8 N5DDB 
TO Meters 






1 KL7IEN 




2 W5ZKJ 




3 VE1BVO 


4 JH8DSC 




5 VK7NBT 




6 VE1BWP 


7 N4QH 




15 Meters 






1 WD5DRB 




Z WA&CEL 




3 KA6AC0 


4 W86CDM 




5 KA4IFF 




6 WB9UKS 


7 N4QH 




8 W87VBQ 
20 Meters 






6 WB9UKS 




7 VK6YL 




8 N8BDI 


9 N4QH 




10 KAflBOS 




3 KA5AOP 


4 KS4B 




5 W89UKS 




6 KB5FN 


7 WAiRVK 




8 N4QH 

1 60 Meters 
1 KC8P 

District Endurance Award 




3 W4PCK 


5 WA4ZLZ 


(54 min ) 


6 GI4KCE 


(aa 


min.) 


7 WA2MCE 


(54 min.) 


8 XE1TIS 


(49 min | 


9 K0WNY 


(52 min.) 


10 KE7C 


(14 


min, J 


11 KA3FUU 


(50 mtn.) 


12 SV1GJ 

Century CI He* Award 


(42 


min.) 




Wor* 100 Cities m 50 US States 






23 KC9CA 




24 M8CJF 




25 KE7C 


26 AKdG 




27 WS7VBVO 
OS Award of Excellence 






61 N7CPE 




62 N89DI 




63 KA7EII 


64 W8UPD 




65 KA2I0J 




66 WB9KUV 


67 KA5KKZ 




60 KA9ENM 




69 PY2UGS 


70 KA3FUR 




71 KA6JQB 




72 KA7CPZ 


73 KA1DJB 




74 KA3GSN 




75 WB9HPR 


76 W4PCK 




77 KA4LSJ 




78 KA4LSJ 


79 KA3FUU 




80 N1BDB 




81 KP4FCK 


82 KA2MIM 




83 WlDWA 




84 KA2MMM 


85 KA7JNP 




86 WA2AKX 




87 KP4ERH 


88 KA8CUS 




89 KA4VNS 




90 NSCJF 


91 WD«EPV 




92 KB8WJ 




93 KAflJTT 


94 KA5KOS 














73 Magazine • April. 1982 143 



^^^^^ 



phone and CW. There will be cer- 
tificates given to amateurs who 
work them and send an SASE 
PTxIff' mailer). We promise 
100% QSL to those meeting 
these requirements. 

Alamo Village, a complete 
reconstructed western town 
open to tourists and located a 
few miles outside of Brackett- 
ville, is the movie-making capital 
of Texas. It was the site of the 
filming of The Alamo with John 
Wayne and Bandeiero with 
Dean Martin, as well as many 
others. The local amateurs will 
be working out of such sites as 
the Cantina, Jailhouse, and 
even a construction of the 
Alamo itself. 

FIRST BRIDGE OVER 
THE MISSISSIPPI 

The Quad Cities Amateur 
Radio Club, Rock Island, Illinois, 
will operate special events sta- 
tions in commemoration of the 
first bridge across the Mis- 
sissippi River, which was a 
significant development in the 
opening up of the western 
United States. 

W9YCR will be on the air from 
1800 hours UCT (noon CST) Sat- 
urday, April 17, through 1800 
hours UCT, Sunday, April 18, on 
the 80- through 10-meter bands 
on the following frequencies: in 
the middle of the Novice CW 
portion of each Novice class 
band, as low in frequency as 
possible in the General CW por- 



tion of each band and 30 kHz up 
from the lower edge of the 
General SSB portion of each 
band. 

QSL via Denny Spurgeon 
N9BKY. 41323rd Avenue. Moline 
IL 61265— and please enclose a 
business-size SASE for a com- 
memorative certificate. 

The Quad Cities is a three- 
county area surrounding Rock 
Island and Moline, Illinois, and 
Davenport and Bettendorf, 
Iowa, It Is the farm implement 
manufacturing capital of the 
world, the largest metropolitan 
area in Iowa and Illinois outside 
of Chicago, and boasts over 
1,000 amateur radio operators. 

SUNDAY 

The Indian River Amateur Ra- 
dio Club <IRARC) will participate 
in a "Sun-Day" exercise in con- 
Junction with the Florida Solar 
Energy Center at Cape 
Canaveral, Florida, on Friday, 
May 7, and Saturday, May 8> 
1982. 

The IRARC station will be us- 
ing the Club call, W4NLX/4, and 
at that time will be operating 
completely on solar power. 

The hours, frequencies, and 
mode of operation on both days 
are as follows: 

• 1300 to 1400 GMT, 40 meters, 
7 r 250 to 7,275 kHz, SSB. 

• 1400 to 2000 GMT, 15 meters. 
21,350*0 21,3751^336, 

A certificate confirming con- 



tact or reception will be issued 
free to each station or short 
wave listener who sends a QSL 
and an SASE (foreign— 1 IRC) to: 
Florida Solar Energy Center, At- 
tention; "Sun-Day/* 300 State 
Route 401, Cape Canaveral FL 
32920. 

ARMED FORCES DAY 

This year's observance of 
Armed Forces Day marks the 
33rd anniversary of communica- 
tions tests between the amateur 
radio fraternity and military 
communications systems. The 
proceedings will include opera- 
tions on CW, SSB, RTTY, and 
SSTV. 

Special commemorative QSL 
cards will be awarded to 
amateurs achieving a verified 
two-way radio contact with any 
of the participating military 
radio stations. Those who re- 
ceive and accurately copy the 
Armed Forces Day CW andfor 
RTTY message from the Sec- 
retary of Defense will receive a 
special commemorative cer- 
tificate. 

Mttitary-to-amateur cross- 
band operations will be con- 
ducted from 1300 UTC May 15 to 
0245 UTC May 16- Military sta- 
tions will transmit on selected 
military frequencies and listen 
for stations on a particular 
amateur frequency specified by 
the military operator. 

Transcriptions of the CW or 
RTTY receiving tests should be 



submitted "as received/' Sub- 
missions should include time, 
frequency, and the call letters of 
the military station copied as 
well as the receiving station's 
name, callsign, and address on 
the submitted copy- 
Entries must be postmarked 
no later than May 22, 1982, and 
be submitted to the appropriate 
command: NAM, NPG, or NAV 
entries go to Armed Forces Day 
Test, Navy-Marine Corps MARS, 
4401 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 
Washington DC 20390. Send 
WAR submissions to Armed 
Forces Day Test, Commander 
7th Signal Command, ATTN; 
CCN^PO-OR N Fort Ritchie MD 
21719. Send AIR entries to 
Armed Forces Day Test, 2045th 
CG/DONJM. Andrews AFB DC 
20331. 

SMALLEST QTH? 

Neffs Area Amateurs (Bel- 
mont County) will operate 
WB8TQG, the smallest ham 
radio shack In Neffs, Ohio, and 
perhaps in the world* Work us 
and let us know if you have a 
smaller one! 

Times: 16002 May 29 to 2200Z 
May 30, 

Frequencies; Phone— 146.46, 
28.610,21.410, 14.340,7,265, and 
3.965; CW-28,120, 21,120, 
7,120, and 3.720. 

Certificate for QSL card and 
business SASE to Floyd 
WB8TQG, PO Box E, Neffs OH 
43940. 





We are happy to provide Ham 
Help listings free, on a space- 

avaifabte basis. We are not hap- 
py when we have to take time 
away from other duties to deci- 
pher cryptic notes scrawled il- 
legibly on dog-eared post cards 
and odd-sized scraps of paper. 
Please type or print (neatly!), 
double spaced, your request on 
an8Vi"x 11" sheet of paper and 
use upper- and lowercase tetters 
where appropriate. Also, please 
make a ,J T" look like a "1 t " not 
an % M which could be an "el" or 
an "eye,*' and so on, Hard as it 
may be to believe, we are not fa- 
miliar with every ptece of equip- 
ment manufactured on Earth for 
the last 50 years* Thanks for 
your cooperation, 

144 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



I will pay up to $25 each, in- 
cluding postage, for an original 
or a copy of an instruction man- 
ual and schematic for a Gertsch 
Model FM-3 frequency meter 
and an RCA type 710 UHF signal 
generator. 

D. S. Toomb N6AFO 

841 W. Tenth St. 

Claremont CA 91711 

I need service manuals for 
RCA mobile 450-470 MH2 trans- 
ceiver models CLUE BT2 FH and 
CMUE BT2 FH. Costs for copy- 
ing or other costs will be reim- 
bursed promptly. 

John S. Hoff KA6HRK 

155G0-A Williams St. 

Tustin CA 92680 



I would like to obtain an oper- 
ating manual and schematic di- 
agram tor a National NC300 re- 
ceiver. I wilt pay any copying 
costs. 

Tom Race 

2104 Claremont Terrace 

Utica NY 13501 

I am in need of a schematic 
and instruction manual for a 
Sorensen ac voltage regulator, 
Model 1000-S. 

Mike Pellock NA6J 

4955 School House Rd. 

Catheys Valley C A 95306 

Does anyone have informa- 
tion about a Teletype oscillo- 
scope (Model OS-1 1/FGC-5) or a 
Collins military receiver/trans 
mitter (Model RT-44irTRC-68) for 
the 225400-MHz band? 

Daniel S- Durgin KA1 AFJ/8 

121 Lake St. 

Uhrichsville OH 44683 



\ need manuals and schemat- 
ics for Tektronix Model 532 and 
545 oscilloscopes, as well as 
the associated plug-m ampli- 
fiers. I will pay !or postage and 
copying. 

Larry Bead WA5TUG 
1333 Edge wood 
Luf kin TX 75901 

I am looking for six-meter con- 
version information for a 
General Electric transmitter- 
receiver unit MT«16u t issue O, 
option AT2 t serial AL 4129. 

Noel P, Larson WftCXR 

Star Rt. Box 489A 

Merrifield MN 56465 

Does anyone have an interest 
in or experience with using 
microwave oven magnetrons for 
service in the 2300- MHz amateur 
band? 

Phil Chadwick W3GMK 

Route 2 
New Hope PA 13938 



CORRECTIONS 



C [LONGER LEAD! 




CUT 
OFF 



(TOP VtEWI 




(OOTiS 
C COLLECTOR! 



CUT 



Fig. 1, Pinout diagram for 
"Amateur Television's Strip- 
per." 



"Amateur Television's Strip- 
per" (March, 1982) uses an 
MRF901 transistor. Several 
varieties are available, and the 
accompanying pinout diagram 
(Fig. 1} may be helpful to readers 
attempting to duplicate this 
project. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 

73 Magazine Staff 



I made hesitation controls for 
Ford ? Chrysler, and Toyota 
automobiles. After I sent you my 
article ("The Hesitator: A Wind- 



shield Wiper Control/' January, 
1982, 73, page 40), I made one for 
a friend who owns a General 
Motors car and ran into a little 
difficulty. General Motors has a 
different wiring philosophy for 
windshield wipers which makes 
a simpler wiring job to get into It. 
Instead of the hesitation control 
unit momentarily connecting 12 
volts to the wiper motor as ex- 
plained in my article, the GM 
cars momentarily connect the 
motor to ground to start a park 
cycle; see Fig. 2* 

The wiring at the motor has a 
three-pin connector. Determine 
which pin has 12 V when the ig- 
nition switch is on. The pin next 
to ft with two leads is the pin 
.needed for the parking cycle 
start. 

The relay contacts in the hes- 



itation control wiff have to be 
wired differently; see Fig. 3. 

Henry Edwell N4UH 
Cleveland NO 



HESITATION 

CONTROL 

UMlT 




iGNirroN 

SWITCH 



Fig. 2. 



—\ CASE GROUND OF 
/fT HESHflTlON UNIT 



f/OTOfc 



ftELAT NOT 
EMERGED 



FOfi GM CARS 

Fig. 3. 




MM HELP 



I am looking for information 
about a R-19 military 100-156- 
MHz receiver (similar to R-28but 
with a different front end), 
Sperry Gyrocompass repeater 
Mark XXIV, model 0, Central 
Electrics model MM-1 multi- 
phase rf analyzer, and model 10 
(A or B) single sideband exciter, 
military test receiver, type 
CPR-60 AAB, Bendlx Aircraft 
radio model DA, Millivac In- 
struments type MV-17C vacuum 
tube f volt ohm-miiliammeter, 
and a Servonics Instruments 
electronic digital voltmeter, 
model EDR-C. I can make photo- 
copies or will pay a reasonable 
amount for them. 

John White WB6BLV 

PM2 33204 

560 N. Indiana St. 

Porterville CA 93257 



I am in need of a schematic 

and instruction manual for a 
Drake R-4B, I will copy and re- 
turn or pay for a photocopy. 

William Bohnenberger 

18 E 199 St. 

Bronx NY 10468 



Does anyone have informa- 
tion on an AM-6154/GRT-21 
VHF-UHF amplifier that uses an 
8930 in a tuned cavity? 

Kent Britain WA5VJB 

5809 Stageline 

Arlington TX 76017 



I need someone to repair my 
VHF Engineering 2-meter syn- 
thesizer. I got it quite a while ago 
new and factory-wired. VHF En- 
gineering is no longer in busi- 
ness. I've tried severaf places, 
The Syn 1 1 has never worked with 
my VHF Engineering 2-meter 
transceiver, which is OK. I may 
only be making the wrong con- 
nections between the two. 

I would appreciate hearing 
from someone who has used the 
two together. 

Tony W. Stalnaker WA4LPJ 

2358 Old Al. Rd, 

Thomas ton GA 30266 

I am looking for an instruction 
manual and schematic for a 
Navy Model BL-2 transceiver 
free type CFN-46ABE, trans, 
type CFN-52ABE) made by 
Fa rns worth Radio and TV Corp \ 
also need a manual and sche- 
matic for a Jackson Model 
CRG-2 oscilloscope, 

Marion Bell KA9BYN 

709 West Broadway 

Logans port IN 46947 

I need any information on the 
Heathktt SB1 10A 6m transceiver 
and/or Heathkft SB500 2m trans- 
ceiver. Thank you. 

Howard Gorden W3CQH 

c/o KSI 

Suite #2 

8403 Dixon Ave. 

Silver Spring MD 20910 



I am in need of a schematic 
and manual for an All Star, Jr. P 
all-wave superhet receiver, ft is 
from the early 1930s and uses 
plug-in coils. 

R. F> Bricker K4CSV 

PO Box 295 

Fort White FL 32038 

I am looking for schematics 
and manuals for a Mercury FC-2 
tube tester, Gonset Communi- 
cator (FAA version), and a Pan- 
oramic Radio Panadaptor model 
PCA^2T-200, 

R. E. Strathkoetter, Sr. WB6SNIM 

5453 Traymore 
Covina CA 91722 

I am in need of a schematic 
for a model BC-i031-C Panoram- 
ic adaptor, t would appreciate 
any information on adapting the 
BC-1031-G for use with an 
HW-101. 

Gordon FulpWBFBH 

Rt. 3, Box 572A 

Placerville CA 95667 

I am need of a schematic and 
tune-up chart for a Haliicrafters 
SX122. 

George Hennessy WB6KJQ 

4273 V2 Fuf ton Ave. 

Sherman Oaks CA 91403 

I am trying to get in touch with 
an old friend. His name is Mike 
Nicoli WB2XNY/6. 1 last saw him 
in El Tore CA where he was at- 
tending UC at Irvine, If you have 
contacted him or know his mail- 
ing address, please contact me. 

Dennis Duckworth 

PO Box 11025 

Stanford CA 94305 



I am in need of a schematic or 
any information on a Model 30 
printer made by Litton In- 
dustries, 

Elmer Eddington 

1337 West 41st Place 

Los Angeles CA 90037 

I am in need of a manual or 
schematic for a Dumont oscillo- 
scope, model 401 -A. I will pay for 
a copy and all associated costs. 

Bernard Krull WD2AEU 

230 Brinckerhoff Court 

Englewood NJ 07631 

I would like information that 
anyone may have on FMing the 
Heath Seneca. 

Larry Campagnano K1PFD 

PO Box 171 

Guilford CT 06437 

I am in need of a three-digit 
up-down counter circuit that 
features programmable inputs, 
reset, a display driver, and digit 
multiplexer. I am counting 
pulses from an optical switch 
used for computer punch-card 
readers. This is an experimental 
project so I would like to keep 
the cost under $5.00. 

Larry Starkweather 

8231 Camino Del Oro # 3 

La Jolla CA 92037 

I would like to join a DX 
association or foundation. Can 
anyone supply me with ad- 
dresses and membership infor- 
mation? 

Karl M. Leite PS7KM 

PO Box 385 

59000 Natal 

RN, Brasil 

73 Magazine * April, 1982 145 






OSCAR ORBITS 



SYNCART 

Quietly, In California and Canada, a group of dedicated amateurs 
is making steady progress on a plan to place an amateur radio 
transponder into a geosynchronous orbit above North America. The 
project is called SYNCART (SYNChronous Amateur Radio 
Transponder) and it is a collaboration among AMSAT, Project 
OSCAR, and AMSAT Canada. U all goes weJI T the transponder could 
be in orbit as early as 19B4, 

An object in geosynchronous orbit appears to hang motionless at 
a point about 23,000 miles above the Earth's equator. Thus, 
amateurs who use the communications facilities aboard SYNCART 
could point their antennas toward the proper point in the sky and 
teave them there. Since SYNCART will not move relative to the sur- 
face of the Earth, no complex tracking mechanism will be required. 
The main disadvantage of a geosynchronous transponder, from the 
operational point of view, is that it can provide communications to 
only about one third of the Earth, At least two more such 
transponders, placed in the correct locations, would be required to 
provide global coverage. Nevertheless, SYNCART will provide 
24-hour-a-day service to most of Region 2. 

As with previous amateur space efforts, SYNCART depends upon 
the scheduled launch of a "professional" satellite for its transporta- 
tion into orbit. However, unlike other missions in which the amateur 
pay load always separated from the main satellite to assume its own 
Independent orbit, the SYNCART package wit! remain attached to 
the main satellite throughout its lifetime. This is a big advantage for 
the SYNCART planners, since the transponder need not carry its 



own stabilization and attitude control systems. SYNCART will rely 
on the main satellite for these crucial necessities, 

At present, plans call for SYNCART to carry a 1269-tcnl35*MHi 
transponder. A 245*to-435-MHz transponder is also a possibility. 
There is also an opportunity for linking to the Phase III satellites, 
since the 435-MHz downlink of SYNCART can be made to fall within 
the uplink passband of the Phase HI birds. Prototype transponders 
are presently under construction. 

It 1 s well to remember that SYNCART is at least two, and more like- 
ly three, years away. No flight hardware has yet been built. Still, 
SYNCART is an exciting prospect and represents another major 
step forward in amateur space communications. 

RSNEWS 

Refinements have become available for the robot frequencies 
given in last month's article about the Soviet Union's RS satellites 
(73 Magazine, March, 1982, page 121)- Table 1 contains the latest in- 
formation. 

The Federation of Radiosport of the USSR has set aside 
Wednesdays (UTC) for experiments on the RS satellites. All 
amateurs are asked to refrain from transmitting through the 
satellites on Wednesdays. 

RS information is courtesy of the AMSAT Satellite Report. For 
more information on the amateur space program, write to AMSAT. 
PO Box 27, Washington DC 20044. 

BEACON AND ROBOT FREQUENCIES iMHij 



Satellite 


Beacon 


Robot 


Robot 


Nam* 


Frequency 


Uplink 


Downlink 


RS-3 


29.320 


— 


w 


RS-4 


29 360 


- 


- 


RS-& 


29.450 


145.826 


29331 


R&G 


29.450 


- 


- 


RS-7 


29.500 


145.B35 


29.341 


RS-0 


29.500 


_ 


t-, 



Table h 



2SCAR 4 Orbital InforutiOfi tot Apt 11 



DSCU t Of bit*] InEoxution f«f April 



oaom 6 Orbital lafarmtiien far Hay 



0SCM S Qrcntal Information for Ray 



Orbit • 
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244»7 

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21349 

218G1 

2BHT7 

20B91 

20965 

20919 

20913 

20941 

21961 

2092 5 

20909 

21003 

2101? 

21031 

2104! 

21159 

11172 

21084 

21141 

21114 

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21142 

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0045:02 

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0027:41 



£q. CfOltif;? 

|Drqra*m tint) 

0S.4 

70,0 

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11,1 

.1 
7i,4 
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.8 
78,9 
10*1 
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2614 

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2714 

27 29 

27 44 

2759 

277 4 

2790 

2B85 

2620 

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2S51 

2&€5 

2OS0 

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002B<19 

«015il7 

■■•2:14 

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tlf5:J4 

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125.0 
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I 145.0 

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133.6 

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135.6 

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117.7 



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HAM HELP 



I need to know the name of 
the amateur magazine, with 
year and month of issue, that 
had an article describing a 
means for sorting fife cards. 
There could be one card per arti- 
cle with the appropriate holes 
punched in the bottom to allow 
sorting. The author suggested 
that a commercial version may 
be available. Any information 

146 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



regarding the article or a source 
for this Kind of file would be ap- 
preciated. 

Lester R. Lauritzen 

Box 117, RFD Route 2 

Qenterville SD 

I am looking for information 
on the Bendix RTH 27A two- 
channel FM transceivers used 
for communication with jet air- 



craft on the ground. I don't have 
the command helmets that went 
with my unils Any information 
for converting Ihese unils to six 
meters would be welcomed. 

Richard Gillespie KC8BQ 

107 Ohio Ave. 

Charlestown WV 25302 



I need a schematic of and ser- 
vice information for a Hy-Galn 
Model 628G four-channel scan- 
ner. I will pay postage and copy- 
ing costs. 

Ray Dunham 

477 East 3rd Ave. 

Chico CA 95926 



I am in need of a schematic 
and operating manuals for an 
Eico Model 315 signal 
generator, TDA-2 telegraph 
distortion analyzer, and 2M*3/U 
capacitance analyzer. I will pay 
copying costs and postage, 

H, Hutchison KA0MYH 
PSC Box 953 

APO Ml 34001 



I am in need of a Kenwood 
TR-999 transmitter. 

Wayne Hale WA6LCW 

839 Mendocino Ave, 

Berkeley CA 94707 

(415)-525-5702 




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the World! 

(and develop a world of business!) 

Expand your sales world-wide. Meet im- 
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Europe at a series of electronics/computer 
trade shows arranged for your convenience 
in Tokyo, Taipei, Hong Kong, Beijing, Canton, 
Seoul, and Munich. Join about 200 fellow 
businessmen in taking advantage of this 
worfd market for sales and buying. Despite 
tfie reasonable tour price it includes some 
fabulous meals and first class hofefs. 

Rar East Electronics Tour 
(Oct. 24-Nov. 7, 1982) 

Optional Around-the-World Tour 
Including Electronica "82 in Munich 
(Nov, 9-13, 1982) 

Call Sara collect for more information. 
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73Magazine • April, 1982 147 









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148 73 Magazine ■ April, 1982 



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73Magazine • April, 1982 149 



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From 



MAGAZINE 



THE 1982 EDITION 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy M. Daniel N8HK 

This is the complete guide to the General License. 
Learning rather than memorizing is the secret. This 
is not a question-and-answer guide that will gather 
dust when the FCC Issues a new test. Instead, this 
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ORDER yours today and talk to the world. 
SG735S $6,95 



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324 B6 



150 JSMagazine * April, 1982 




NEW from 



THE 

NEW 

WEATHER 

SATELLITE 

HANDBOOK 




BY DR, RALPH E, TAGGART 

Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the best- 
selling Weather Satellite Handbook— containing all the infor- 
mation on the most sophisticated and effective spacecraft 
now in orbit. Dr. Taggart has written this book to serve both the 
experienced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer. 
The book is an introduction to satellite watch ing, providing atl 
the information required to construct a complete and highly ef- 
fective ground station. Not just ideas, but solid hardware de- 
signs and alf the instructions necessary to operate the equip- 
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are operating stations* the book details all procedures neces- 
sary to modify their equipment for the new series of space- 
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equipment- Order BK7383 $8.95 

SAVE $2.95 



WEATHER SATELLITE 
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By Dr, Ralph E. Taggart WB8DQT Valuable information in this 
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Chapters such as "How to Build an Electric Timer for Satellite 
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ing and handling charge). 



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is See List of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 151 



Automatic 
rR-2400 Band Scanner 

for Kenwood TR-2400 stops and locks on busy, or slops 

and resumes when* carrier drops. Controlled by key 
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Assembled— $24.95 Kit-S14,95- 

R-9000 Memory Scanner 

lor Kenwood TR-9O0Q scans 5 memory channels Slops 
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Allow 4 to 6 weeks for delivery 



152 73Magazine • April, 1982 



Two-meter HT. Amplifier Kit 



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UHF& VHF 

ampfrfier kfts 



1.5 watts in— 20 out 
COR BNC in— SO 239 out 
small size: 1-3/T6 N x3"x4 1/2* 
Class C or AB1 





^459 



QRO ENGINEERING 



1 396 Edwards Ave. 

Lake wood, OH 44107 

(216) 221-9500 



APARTMENT BLUES? 

Get on the air NOW! 

with 

HANDBOOK OF APARTMENT OPERATION 

by Dan Fox, W2IQD. 

Everything you need to know about operating from these 

tough spots. Over 150 fact-filled pages cover 

every aspect of aparfmenf/condo operation. 

MONEYBACK GUARANTEE 

only $8.95 +1 .00 p&h Check, NIC, VISA (card#-date) 

to Wessex Publishing Co. Dept. B9 

POB 1 75 N. Chelmsford, MA.01 863 



FILTER CASCADING 



FT1 01 - TS520 - TS820 



Probably the most popular units ever pro- 
duced, these solidly built transceivers were 
made to LAST tf you can live without gadgetry . 
why replace your reliable time-tested rig 
with a costly new model? Especially since 
you can easily make your receiver equal in 
selectivity and ultimate rejection to any now 
on the market with an INEXPENSIVE Fox 
Tango Filter^Cascading Kit? 

CONSIDER THESE FEATURES 

• Easy installation * 30 minute average. 

• No drilling, switching, alignment. 

• 16 pole filtering yields: 

Filter Shape Factor as high as 1.15. 
Ultimate Rejection better than lOQdB 
Works wonders on SSB; improves CW. 

• Provides insertion-loss compensation. 

• Complete instructions, clear diagrams, 

• Improves RX audio; no effect on TX. 

• Fits all models of series - any fetter. 

TS520 Series: Order Kit #520K $70 

TS820 Series: Order Kit #S2QK $70 

FT- 101 Series (not ZO): Order Kit#4K $75 

Prices include shipping to US & Canada 
(elsewhere add $5 for Airmail) 

All kits include genuine 8-pole top-quality FT 
Filter, Improved cascading/mini-amp circuit 
board, all needed parts, cables, detailed 
instructions—nothing else to buy. 

In addition to the above, Fox-Tango features 
cascading kits for the FT-901/2 ($65), FR- 
101 ($55), Heathkit S8104A ($60). Also a 
wide line of SSb, CW, AM, and special filters 
for Yaesu, Kenwood, Drake R4C and 7*Line, 
Heathkit, and Collins 75S-3B/C. All Fox- 
Tango c ry stal f i It e rs a re gu a ra nte e d f or O N E 
YEAR. Beware of cheap imitations; they are 
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GO FOX-TANGO 

AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN AGENTS 
Scandinavia: MICROTEC. Makedein 26, 

3200 Sandefjord, NORWAY 
Except Seandanavta: INGOIMPEX, 

Postfach 24 29, D-8070, Ingolstadt, W. 

GERMANY. 

We welcome mail or phone orders 

and accept payment by VISA, 

MASTERCHARGE. M.O.. Check, 

Cash, or COD. (at your expense). 



FOX TANGO CORPORATION 

Since 19? J By atiri For Rad'o Amateurs 
Bo\ 159-145 W Pnlm Beach. FL 33406 



Take your favorite H.T. out 
for a drive tonight. 



VISA or MASTERCARD for 
same day shipment. 



For $69.95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fully guaranteed 35 W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operating 
your H.T. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig. The model 335A produces 35 watts 
out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with IC-2AT, TR-2400, 
Yaesu, Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs of 25W and 75W T in addition to a 100W 
amplifier kit for 430MHZ. ^382 

Communication Concepts Inc. 






2648 N. Aragon Ave . Dayton. OH 45420 
(S13) 296 1411 







RTTY/CW 




ROM-116 

RTTY/CW Operating System 

Detailed brochure available on request 



Featuring: 

1200 BAUD OPERATION. Not limited to 1 10 baud be- 
cause of timing loops. 60, 66, 75 & 100 W.P.M. 
Plus 110, 150, 300, 600 & 1200 baud operations 
possible, 

FLEXABILITY OF OPERATION. Instantly change: Baud 
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SPLIT SCREEN VIDEO. Transmit & receive data dis- 
played separately. 

REAL TIME. Automatic CW/ID without user interven- 
tion. Automatically updates ^ 
at end of month or year. 

nkroProducfs 



Other features 
include: 

• Two Serial Ports 
Fourteen Buffers 
Automatic CW fO 
Transmit Control 

• Selective Call Feature 

• Error Correction 
- Word Wrapping 

Easy To Interface 
i 30 Day Unconditional Guarantee 
> Hardware requirements: TRS-80 
Model for 3 16K 

External terminal unit. 



Phone t -305-683-9587 



^323 



606 State Street, P.O. Box 892-R* Marysville, WA 98270 • (206) 659^4279 



**See u&t of Aavertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 153 



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ICOM 



BP-3 BATTERY 
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TRANSMIT ON 
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Send your BP-3 with 
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FINALLY. . . 

A SQUARE DEAL 

ON YOUR 

ELECTRONIC 

SCRAP 



Afa>t> "hmkf!-* " piety flnf raff,-* on strap; Hit? 
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f/iatvrmi sent t<> us is i'ftiiwirfti&tly refwvd unci 
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PC Banrriji 
t ttfiittt'tfitit 
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Fhr,farthi>F information tin fa out read™ wfriiv 
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}H\ ELECTRONIC RECYCLERS 

OF MASS, INC. 

263A S. Mam Street, Box t> 

Midd /f ton . Ma bs. i 94 9 

Toll Env (8&QJ 343 830S 

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iv82 






O 

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m 

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YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER KIT 

15 minutes to in- 
stall: scan restarts 
when earner drops 
off: busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on-off: in- 
cludes module and 
instructions. 

Model AS-1.S25.00 




*Sk 



FT -207R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
IJ^S MODEL BS-1 $14.95 

'No more dead batteries due to memory back- 
up 

" 30% less power drain when sqoeiched 

'Simple to install; si ep by -step instructions 
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'A mA memory backup reduced to GOO IA. 

*45 mA receiver dram reduced to 30 mA. 

improved audio fidelity and loudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P.O. Box 3966 ^ 00 

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA B2803 



AMP LETTER 



(AM 
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t io 
?. 

The 
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[V 

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n 
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A SO 

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nd op 
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u re g 

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very 
rgani 

tor's 
terS 

h Top 

t.ure 

-LETT 



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devot 
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of pa 

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publ 

week. 

'i to f 



Amateur Ra 

the design 

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an 5 a ye ynu 

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nd informal 



ished 

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times 
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ion ■ 

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Corn c r 



t'CS * 
Artie 

ER TR 



The AMP-LETTER be 
im amp can he fun 
a^ costly as buyf 

A one year subscr 
is'; Sla.OO/year (1 
Magazine a n f5 yOU 
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ADER 

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P-LETTE5 
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You can pay more — 
But you can't get more! 




Model IH 16K 

$839 

Model ill 48K 
2 disc & RS232C 

$2100 



Color Computer 4K 

$310 

w/16KExt. Basic 

$459 



BUY DIRECT. These are just a few of aur great 
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oi Radro Shack Software. utt i e ton, mao^o 




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K" 444 



QUALITY MICROWAVE SYSTEMS 



2100 TO 2600 MHz ANTENNAS 
MINIMUM 34 db GAIN OR GREATER 

Complete System as pictured $149.95 

(6 month warranty) 
Down Converter (Probe Mntd.) 

assembled & tested $59.95 

Down Converter (Chassis Mtnd.) 

assembled & lested $59.95 

Power Supply, assembled & tested 549*95 
Down Converter PC board. 

with parts, unassembled & Data $39,95 
Data Information (Plans) $9.95 

Send cash, check 
or money order to; 

Philiips-Tech 
Electronics 

Dept. SP-73 ^421 
P.O. Box 33205 
Phoenix, 
Arizona 85067 



IkS**- 



pricing, COM. s. 
MB&tercharge, 
and VISA call: 

(602} 274-2885 



CB. TO 10 METER KITS 

AMERICA'S # I SOURCE FOR 

FM — SSB — AM 



IN STOCK— Kits for most CB. Models 

NEW— 1 0-meter FM Discriminator Board 

— fits most PLLrigs Kit — Assembled and 

tested. 

NEW AND USED— FM & SSB converted 

CB s now in stock — from $90 

LOW COST— Prices range from $10 

to $50. 

ORDER BY PHONE— (6 17} 77 1-4634 

VISA «. MASTERCARD— accepted 

FREE CATALOG— write or call today! 



AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 
P.O. BOX 638 

WEST YARMOUTH. MA. 02673 
(617)771*4634 ^ 



RED HOT SPECIALS!! 



AZDEN PCS-3000 

2-meter Transceiver $283.00 
AZDEN PSC-300 

Handheld Transceiver 288.00 

KDK2025A MK It w/TT mike 265.00 

JAlMELQSA^2-meter Preamp 36,50 

BEARCAT 20-20 Scanner 269.00 
KANTRONICS FIELD DAY II 

Codereader 360.00 
All MFJ 12% off list price 

TEN-TEC Argosy HF Transceiver 465.00 

TEN-TEC Delta HF Transceiver 73B.O0 

TEN-TEC Omni C HF Transceiver 1040,00 
New SANTEC 144 2-meter Handheld 297.00 

New SANTEC 440 Handheld 327.00 

AEA MORSEMATIC Keyer 167.00 
KANTRONICS 

MINI CODEREADER SET 249.00 

KANTRONICS M1CRO-RTTY 255.00 



Ben Franklin Electronics 

115 Ya N Main Hillsboro KS 67063 
316-947-2269 



,^439 



mm 



CB. SPECIAL 

(Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 

10 METER FM 

New Hy-Gain 40 channel primed circuu 
Coard5 a^sertitjly (Sq^eu-.h pot. volume 
control and Channel switch nol mcludeni 
Boards sold as is Dimension B"xe" 

1-9 pes S7.5Q ea. 
10-49 pes $8.50 ««. 

{While quantities last) 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL CB, 

Remoles nave a melal frame Speaker, 
plastic case, and control mic nol included 
Sold as is $14,95 «a 

CB, BARGAIN 
CB, boards missing, parts c damaged 
Can oe used (or spare parts Buy several 1 ' 

S3, 50 ea 

Order mformatjon Please add '14 00 for 
S^H via UFS COD 's accepted for Q r de r s 
lotalmg S50 00 or more Elonda residents 
add *% sales tax. Mrnimum order S 15.00 
foreign orders US fgndS.Onlv add 20% for 
S/H MASTER CARD and VISA accepled 

Surplus Electronics Corp. 

7294 NW 54th St. 

Miami FL 33166 ^ 69 

P.HJ 305-887 822B 



154 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



WACO IV! 




OUR NEW BANDPASS- 
REJECT DUPLEXERS WITH EXCLUSIVE 

B p B r CIRCUIT FILTERS® 

provide? superior performance, 
especially at close Freemen cv spacing. 

Models available for all commercial and ham bands. 
Special prices for amateur repeator clubs. 



UJ* 




P.O. BOX 7127 • WACO, TEXAS 76710 
817/848-4435 



BILLET ELECTB9IICS 



I 

1 

i 

i 

7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $6.95 
! 



P.O. BOX 401 2ME 6AWJWID. T* 75040 214/278-3553 



.' '■! 



\ 



SHALL SIMPLE r+VBftiD IC AND COMf OfJf *t?S FlT OH 12 
■ J PC 90ARD i!WCLUO€Dj RUN$ OH 1 7VDC OR EAT FOR 
ANY PROJECT THAT NEEDS AH INEXPENSIVE AMP LESS 
THAN 3 1 t TH© « 5 WATTS C0ilPATi»l,E WITH S£-W1 
SOUND KIT 

Doomsday Alarm Kit S995 

ale sJecptftg and tfou wot. 
" ad to shw* four m<wy ttwn th« koto tut 
i noway lo »cc 
, rv>wis screams r .office 

k'l Four ^eparite ' i cjnccUed 

Teoctd at • • of crazy sounds A 

- tuf* h'.t or a prBClical tJir " «ntr» 

PC board ana ail necessAf > comro«iM , ii» i«u < t* 'd* e i 
L;I ZBOEHDA-0? 



Sound Effects Kit 

$18.50 

Th* «.0> Sound EffeOt K>H hll . ' rQu 

. :. j . ", . : i : • , ■ ■. ■• •- . •-.--.-. 

■>atfM«t ttacftpi * nmrr »nd tpmmmm 0**n 



* * ■; ■ DnM 




T** 



V- 



jTZ Time Zone Clock Kit 



Microprocessor POM ^)i5fhoiir 

tOtTTIflrt] and ? waMd 1 ii-' i. ,1 h i n ■iirruli ^jFge 

fi" ORANGE rOBdrinh in mm I! - I. •. I I AM- Camos 

complete wuh a'tracli^e |il-i -i i as« nni wsJiplug XFMR 

• £ tligiS iflfj 'nin , • Q n i * 1 ' ■ i 



• ' 


K\m> 


i 


■ fan- ■ 




* . . 


IWllCtlBS 




nil P' ■ .. 


■ -jntti fl*- • 


.. i, 


SS4 40 






Overvoltage Protection Kit S*-95 

■Mi e**i«*iiii*e mjinpiTienl l«om o> 

*ork* tnirh any 
tuwd DC powtrt sciutce nptt 



• tounde, « tw 
TI7447T iWiOKU *»**^"fc«f ^i?\et»a«=a 
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i Suit im ™ l»o (not* 

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>?C&04'i3lLv44 04lt#'f 3v*>i I 
J64T7 Ch*p tt -r*uflfd 



ELECTRONIC MUSIC MAKER 



THIS UNIQUE KIT CONTAINS A 

mCAOPHOC€S£QM CM* WIT++ flOU. 

IT HAS SEEN PROGRAMMED TO Ft AY 

the first « ro ro worrs of the 

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r/OH JS $WPiLt7 d WORKS WITH any a 

OH 1Q OHM SPKR [WOr mCLVQEQ}. 

TH£ K1T WILL OPERATE ON 

mvoc on f^imc with optional 

TAAHSfOttMEn, (CONVERTB TO 

1 17V AC). Alt COMPONENTS 4 BOARD 
Cctn pl<1e K H S 1 G .95 Trftttil ur me r £ 1 .35 

Tuihi Tarmdu' ' *illnm Thll ' MnH»lii|ni Clii'm 
&'mi Sii-nifll^ii H nni.*« " V^ik«f- EIi-iiiHv " ArnrJiuji 
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UH1*nil*tl* Q%Q*r Via %m*\* I Mftt ' IhtlM'IIU* 

djnuiH * atmii tn* i>t *#ri*«Mi4»< £**"«*■ _ 



i 



CA30M TRANS DND AMP W 

TLO-K DUAL BIFET AMP &B 

CD4566CMOS - W60CKTTR 90 

MC3301 QUADOPAMPlMSE t) 44 

FPT500 PHOTO TRANSISTOR 44 

tip 1 io nph DARL za ic ea 

TEMP CONTROLLED HOTPLATE 
5' * 10" TEMPERED GLASS IIQ'F 
tolfiO'F 1.U 

3d50iFS) MICRO P CHIP tM 

t0103 SENSmVE GATE SCR 3/.M 



Vf«rr f/ip nnf twr right- , - thr Miring iray. F 
DUAL PHOTO RESISTOR 1 SM4 

AT 2 • 891D SOUND EFF ECTS 1 1 m 

m PAGE MANUAL FOR ABQVE 2 B8 

JUItBO RFD LED ASS T STALES 20 T 38 



Regulator Card 
Kit $14.95 




3 jjintL i £ixvti.i»* ]p«i* k ,i*» cm "** 



114,95 



REOgLATOH CARD v > r 

Mh3« CUFtflEMT FARTS 

f 1 - TMJ71 « 2i* i 

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t*V*C Oul« l>» 



THE SUPER MUSIC MAKER KIT 
fl£VI5IOW2-$2A0i 

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COMPAKY 






ELECTRO SPACE PRINTED 
CIRCUIT CARD EJECTORS 

| ■! 1 I ft thick n:HrrfA | 07? Eil-Dtl 

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I1tl!i0 While 5 2S S.31 t IS 

11411 Mpfl ?S 31 ^9 



pt, D m O_ t0 » , ^ k> ^S-&9< 



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4401T 
4401B 
44030 
44033 
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44040 



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-140 S1 

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44040 



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4407 5 
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RCA C MOS 

"CAHO 

CB4O04K 1 

CO4O014AF 

CO*M?UflE 
CD40MBE 
COA0T*ySE 
C04D13BE 
C04O15BE 
COAOtftBF 
C0401TBE 
CD40TBBF 
CD403DBE 
C04O33BE 
CD4G34SE 
CO40J5BE 
C04037BE 
C04030BE 
C 04040 BE 
COAOAftBE 
C04049BE 
CCMOSdBE 
f.D4ar.iBE 
C040S3BE 
C040&3BE 
CD4014BE 
C 04050 BE 
C04OAOHF 
C04005BE 
CDAOftBUBE 
CD4O70BE 
CD4071BE 
CD4075BE 
CD40S1BE 
C 040*3 B£ 
CD404B8E 
CD4U3BE 
CD4511BE 
CD4520BE 
CD23100E 
CO*0TO3Sf 
C04Ti 4 «-pr 



RCA POWER 
ftiWTEC OCAHa 



I 34 35^43 



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430S3 
43T03 
42270 
43053 

43054 

43053 '1 

430S3-2 

4 U31J 

43440 

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437T2 

43773 

44030 



C123D 

T33330 

T3JOOO 

T3BOGB 

T2BO0O 

T2ftSOO 

TIP39 

TiB^SftA 

t.p r A 

npiji 

npus. 

Mi? 955 

HCA30S5 

IN J 103 

2 HI I/O 

2M30S3 

.-«•- i 

IN 305 5 

JNLiO-iriHOM 

3M3A39 

3N3440 

3N3T71 

i N 3 J J 3 

2N.-IJ7S 

IHMKl 



51 33 

1 4ft 

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4541 B 
43754 
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2Nftl03 
2N6107 
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AND 



T( STATIC RAMS, EPROMS. 

Sltich Nti Tl Hq. Oe^cnplion 

4 7625 TM5:;0d45JL 1 « K6 EPROM 450 H5 

47530 TWS3MB~4aJL 2KX& EPROW450H5 

47535 TIAS2M345JL 4«.XH EFROM 450N5 

47540 TMS?1144S«L 1**4 SRAM450NS 

47645 TMS40L44-45NL4K)(l SRAM 450 W5 

47ftSO TUB4llft70hlL 1BK DRAV 20QN5 



DYNAMIC RAMS 

1 24 25'Up 

i 9 so i a. 75 

15 45 14 25 

23 BO 22 DO 

Q 50 B.7S 

1 1 90 1 1 DO 
ft ftO 



1 5 



■wrm 

13835 
13836 
13B27 
13B2B 
13329 
13430 



WTYFE 
I3B31 
11532 
13433 

I 36 34 
13635 
13336 



ELPAC POWER SUPPLIES DC DC CONVERTERS 



Cunm 
(S1A| 
0K3S 
0-34 
0-30 
0-30 
0-10 
O-ID 



125 

125 
100 

1 :c 

50 

so 



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3 O 7 O 

3 or o 
3 0-7 
3 0-7 
3 0-7 
3-0-7 



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4 0-7 
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4 0-7 

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4 0-7 



V<yiM* 

itfDCi 
13tO# 
13^0i* 
IScD T 
IS;© 7 
2B=0 7 
2ft iO 7 



1330 5 
1 3*0 ft 
15TO.T 
15^0 7 
3Btt 4 



mine ha> 
4ft* 51*3 05 
46i 5»*3 OS 
48..51.3 05 
48 ■ SlijLOS 
4fii 5U3 0S 
4Bi 51 »3 OS 



651 ii 3>1 77 
451 it 2il 77 
651x1 211 77 
65l*i i.i 77 
45J»1 3» 
451*1 2*1.77 



Floppy Dlie" power tuppiy 'or B dr^e. jt\ buiH by Sftugart CDC. Winqo. 
elc.lhreenurpLLiii ' ;.v -J/4V 5V1 Ouipulcu^refilma* f2 5A 3 OA,-3.4A 
PH., O SA3 atoth. hlo IJB01 HQflOO 



MO PUT EC 

■ VOLT-OMM Mllli*mmi*lin IHRU h 74o, 13725f . . 

Ra rs ot-j. Te itti 1 Par itrn 1 1 bn1 Io Mrt* 1 rum t . 35V io 4. SV f Slock N o. 1 37 33) 
- Ulnidamp AC Vull-Ammelar 



5700 
7 OO 

roe 

7 00 
TOO 
700 



2300 
3300 
3300 
33 00 
3300 
3300 



$34 75 
SI 3 95 



Stock Ho 


AC Ampere.! 
Rip-pet 


Pflie 


13730 
13731 
13732 


0-3 5A 
OSOA 
0-1 00 A 


S39 50 
» 50 

39 SO 



2 35 

I BS 

BO 



IC Insertion Extraction Kit, mc^ao-i oipic **t'*\etorA m^a m*+n**% 

lft KGOmoftAI* #ll IC * from 1 4 \tt 40 p-*ii, •_ WG5 U'e 



Sleuth Ma 13 30* 



934 95 



- LINE SPUTTER « J iLn*t T*»< ft eccurale 
T«*4liri04 01 AC power coniurrtpllofi 
iStoefc "13r. ■ ft <*»5 

- vOMhWULTlTf STfR Ve'uuie ttrtOtvm 
V.n.*nir««»r|Si«» "I3729J SI 3 95 



Bow Rosin Core Soldier 
(flO/40 Alloy) 

Langlh WetQihl 

StptLWo Die. |f»eti |On Pf*te 

50075 06 1 i 5 S3 28 

5O0T6 062 25 4 4 38 

5DOTT Oft 2 50 B 4 03 

50O7B 032 33 1 S 4 OB 

SOD7B 033 99 4 5 It 

5O0BO 032 17ft B B 83 



*^Se* Liitot Aavertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 155 



QUADS TOWERS. 
TOWERS QUADS 

2, 3, 4 ELEMENT QUADS AND 
ALSO THE "Special 1 ' 40. pre 
tuned, with bamboo or ftber* 
glass spreaders. Our references 
are any amateur who owns a 
Skylane. Priced at $121,00 and 
up, WARC frequencies easily 
added. Enclose 50$ for details 
and treatise on quads. 

TOWERS. 

Steel or Aluminum, Crank down 
and tilt over, from $360, less 
liberal discount. Dollar bill for 
complete information on both 
towers/quads, 

SKYLANE PRODUCTS 



W4YM 



406 Bon Aire Ave 
Temple Terrace, Fia 3J417 
Phone 1 ST3 9SB 4213 




sample issue 

only $2 50 

PP0 

OUR r5TM \t\H 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 



MAGAZINE 



** H5 



-FCTC THE STECUUZtDCOMMUNltATTaH RaDKD MtATilQT 



'/■ year 

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Surltcc Airmail Airmail 

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A TVSSTV-FAX-R TTY^SatetfiW^EME 
MtcrowwG nfrtcf Computers 



S 
J 
S 



Pu&ttshed J 2 times per year by Mike Stone W&QQCD 
P.O. Box H, Lowden, Iowa S2255 0408 



CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 

KITS for AM— SSB— FM 40 Channel PLL 
chassis conversions 
DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS for easy in* 
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ment 

BAND COVERAGE flexibility provides 
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PRICES Low cost prices range from 
$8.00 to $50.00 

A(( kits are in stock including 
several different FM kits. 
FREE CATALOG Write or call today. 

-to INDEPENDENT 
CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

P.O. Box 183 

Sandwich, Ma. 02663-0183 

(617)888-4302 




THE PROFESSIONAL 

TOUCH TONE 



• i 




An ultra high quality 
encoder for professional 
application, Absolute reliability and 
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application. Totally serviceable, easy to 
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catalog and information! (213) 852*1515 
or P.O. Box 3435, Hollywood, CA 90028. 



PATENTED 



*ATeVF 



^pipo^Communications 

Emphasts is on Quality & Ftetiabtftty *•* 300 







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RF Processor 

New Shurwood SE 2 mike-Hnc i[ipwh processor for any trans, 
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fTrjqufjncy response equal iiur inr iri.'unriiiini iinetliLfihihry 
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Ada S3 shipping per order $ 1 5 own* 

E u t opum : Please contact lngo«tti»*, Pbtltatfi 24 43. D4MJ70, 

1 nfloUurfT. Weft C-^rrriirry, 

Sherwood Engineering he 

1268 South Ogden St. 

Denver, Colo. 30210 

(303) 722-2257 





Satellite TV 



FOR THE HOME 
Sick of Network TV? 

Our receiver lets you get 
over 75 channels of tele- 
vision directly from earth- 
orbit mg cable TV satel- 
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f rom oft shore oil rigs, 
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41 Jft jriiuir- F tftu 



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GO MOBILE WITH YOUR H.T.! 




Model I— icewn IC 2A/T, Etc. 

Model K-1 lor TR.2S00 

— slides on bottom ot radio 



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Modal T— Simple mod for Tempo 



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Model Y — FT 207R, 
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add J1.50 Sakas Tax, 
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SIGNAL GENERATOR 



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5349,95 
plus shipping 



• Covers 100 to 1A5MH2 In 1 kHz steps with thumb- 
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low earner • RF output adjustable from 5*500 mV at 
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• Add-on Accessories avanaoie lo euuenrt treq 
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tones. AM precision 120 dB calibrated altenuator 

• Call lot details * Dealers wanted worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

19*23 Jamaica A*e . Hoilla, NY 11423 
Phona; (212)458 2720 



^311 



156 73Magazine • April, 1982 



DlAL 



YOUP 



TRADE IN 

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8340-42 Olive Blvd.* PO Box 28271 # St. Louis, MO 63132 



Most&rGard 



SEE YOU AT DAYTON 






73 Magazine • April, 1962 157 



E 



rSM^Z 



V^# electronic* 

Introducing 



(602) 242-3037 

{602)242-8916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX. ARIZONA 85015 



TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 
Satellite Receiver Boards— Now in Stock 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD $25.00 

TTiis board provides conversion from the 3.7-4.2 band first to 
900 MHz where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, 
second, to 70 MHz. The board contains both local oscillators, 
one fixed and the other variable, and the second mixer. Con- 
struction is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC amplifiers 
for the gain stages. 



SIX 47pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with dual conversion board 



. . . $6.00 



70 MHz IF BOARD .-, $25.00 

This circuit provides about 43dB gain with 50 ohm input and 
output impedance, it is designed to drive the HOWARD/ 
COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator, The on-board bandpass filter 
can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 35 MHz with a 
passband ripple of less than Va dB. Hybrid IC's are used for 
the gain stages. 



DEMODULATOR BOARD . $40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV sig- 
nals in the 1 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase 
locked loop, de-emphasizes and filters the result and ampli- 
fies the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs 
include the audio subcamer, a DC voltage proportional to the 
strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at 
about 2 volts DC. 

SINGLE AUDIO $15.00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6.8 MHz fre- 
quency. The Miller 9051 coiJs are tuned to pass the 6.8 MHz 
subcarrier and the Miller 9052 coil tunes for recovery of 
the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO. . .$25.00 

Duplicate of the single audio but also covers the 6.2 range* 



DC CONTROL 



4 - + 4 * * * 



■ ■ a * * • 



$1 5.00 



SEVEN .01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with the 70 MHz IF board, . 



$7.00 



SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS $100.00 

INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO (2 single audio boards) 



1900 to 2500 MHz MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHz approximately, and 
is intended for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled, making the I.F. range approximate- 
ly 54 to 88 MHz for standard TV set channels 2 thru 7. 

P.C. BOARD with DATA 1to5 $15.00 6 to 11 $13.00 12 to 26 $11.00 27 -up $9.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly $49.99 P.C. Board with all chip caps soldered on . . . $30.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly P.C. Board assembled & tested $69.99 

plus 2N6603 $69.99 P.C. Board assembled & tested with 2N6603$79.99 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Dish) & all Cables for installation. 180 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12- up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Yagi) & all Cables for installation. 90 Day Warranty. 

1t05 $150.00 61011 $140.00 12-up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 

1to5 $125.00 6to11 $115.00 12-up $100.00 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With PVC. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12-up $100.00 





SPECIAL NEW STOCK OF CARBIDE DRILL BITS- 


-YOUR CHOICE $1.99 




1.25mm 


1 3/64 


36 


47 


55 


63 


1.45mm 


19 


37 


48 


56 


64 


3.2mm 


20 


38 


49 


57 


65 


3.3mm 


24 


39 


50 


58 


67 


1/8 


26 


40 


51 


59 


68 


3/16 


29 


44 


52 


60 


69 


5/32 


30 


45 


53 


61 




7/32 


31 


46 


54 


62 





1 



158 73Magazine • April/1982 



Start taking calls in curious places with the 



revolutionary, new 



Cordless &&€OM° Phone 



Special Purchase— The <&«#/* Cordless Telephone! 



We are pleased to announce the Escort Mark III is now available 
at special pricing. We bought the manufacturer's entire inventory-- 

and we are passing the savings on to you! 

The Escort Mark III was originally designed to retail for $199,95. Now, we 

suggest a retail price of $169,95 to $189.95, Or, you can move them 

out at $149.95* In any event, you Ml like the profit margins. 



QUANTITY 

1 — 2 units 

3 — 5 units 

6 — 11 units 

12 — 23 units 



DEALER PRICE 

69,75 each 
64,50 each 
62.50 each 
60.75 each 



GROSS PROFIT AT $149.95 

53% 
57% 
58% 
59% 



On all orders of 12 or more, we pay the freight! This is your opportunity 
to stock up for the Christmas buying season. These are Ideal gift 

items, that will really move out! 




ESCORT MARK III SPECIFICATIONS 



VHF DUPLEXERS 

This duplexer was made for RF Harris Mobile 
Phones and Two Way Radios. These duplex- 
ers can be used in any mobile phone or two 
way radio system, along wrth having the ca- 
pabilities to be modified for UHF use. The 
physical dimensions are 3 3/5" Long, 4 2/5 n 
Wide, and 1 1/10" Deep. The approximate 
weight is 18oz./1 lb,2oz.. PRICE $74.99 









* 



& 



* v 



c^ 



I 



• Operates as a regular telephone on touch-tone or 
rotary dial systems 

• Range up to 300 feet 

• Ni-Cad rechargeable batteries included 
in telephone 

• Charger built into base transmitter 

• Simple plug-in installation! 

• High-performance antenna 

• Full duplex, answer and dial out 

• Full FCC approvaf 

Exactly As Shown 




HOW WE CUT THE CORD. 

The new Cordless Phone 
works on a simple, 
highly sophisticated principle. 
A small base station plugs into 
your regular phone jack, and 
an electrical waif outlet. The 
base station then transmits 
any in- or out-going call to the 
handheld receiver, anywhere 
up to 300 feet. 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0160 

(For orders only) 




JVI^z electroi|ic$ 






73 Magazine • April, 1082 159 



"FILTERS" 



Collins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 
455KHz at 3.2KHz Wide. 



$15.00 



Atlas Crystal Filters 

5.52-2.7/8 5.52MHz/ 2. 7KHz wide 8 pole 

5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 595MHz /.500KHz wide 4 pole CW 
5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole lower sideband 
5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5.545MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole 
9.0MHz/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-.500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/8 

9.0SB/CW 



Your Choice 

$12.99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHz at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36KC Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal Filters 
Nikko FX-07800C 
TEW FEC- 103-2 
Tyco/CD 001019880 



Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


5350C 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 



7 . 8MHz 
10.6935 

10.7MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48D84396K05 

11.7MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth (For Motorola 

Communications equipment) 



10.00 
10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



Ceramic Filters 



Murata 


BFB455B 


455KHZ 






CFM455E 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFM455D 


455KHZ +- 


7KHz 




CFR455E 


455KHz +- 


5.5KHz 




CFU455E 


455KHz +- 


1.5KHz 




CFU455G 


455KHz +- 


lKHz 




CFW455D 


455KHz +- 


lKHz 




CFW455H 


455KHZ +- 


3KHz 




SFB455D 


455KHz 






SFE10.7 


10.7MHz 






SFG10.7MA 


10.7MHz 




Clevite 


T0-01A 


455KHZ 






T0-02A 


455KHZ 




Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 


455KHz +- 


1KHZ 




LF-B6/CFU455H 


455KHz +- 


lKHz 




LF-C18 


455KHz 




Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 


455KHz +- 


2KHz 


Matsushira 


EFC-L455K 


455KHZ 




R0TR0N MUFFIN FANS Model Mar 


k 4/MU2A1 





$ 2.40 
6.65 
6.65 
8.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
4.35 
2.40 
2.67 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.80 
5.80 

10.00 
4.80 

7.00 



These fans are new factory boxed 115vac at 14watts 50/60cps. Impedance Protected-F 
CFM is 88 at 50cps and 105 at 60cps. 



S 7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC. Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Beam Dia. .75mm. Beam Dir. 2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 
lOOOvdc +-100vdc 3.7ma. TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 



Power output 1.6mw. 
68K ohm lwatt ballast 



- 



i 



160 ?3Magazine • April, 1932 



u 



AMPLIFIERS" 



AVANTFK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 



Models 

Frequency Range 

Noise Figure 

Voltage 

Ga i n 

Power Output 

Price 



UTC2-102M 


AP-20-T 


AL-45-0-1 


AK-1000H 


30 to 200MC 


200 to 400MC 


450 to 800MC 


500 to lOOOMC 


1.5dB 


6.5dB 


7dB 


2,5dB 


+I5vdc 


+24vdc 


-6vdc @ +12vdc 


+12vdc @ -12vdc 


29dB 


30dB 


30dB 


25dB 


ldB Gain +7dBm 


ldB Gain +20dBm 


ldB Gain -5dBm 


ldB Gain +8dBm 


$49.99 


$49.99 


$49.99 


$69.99 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 

Model RAY- 3 

Very High Level (+23dBm LO) 70KHz to 200MHz L0,RF s DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss,dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min. Mid. Range 

{LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 30Typ./ 

25Min. 

Price $24.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7dBm LO) . 1MHz to 400MHz L0,RF,DC to 400MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8.5Max. 

Isolation.dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 6QTyp./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 50Typ./35Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP./ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 






Hewlett Packard Linear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/35831E 

^ i — — ■ 



Collector Base Brakedown Voltage at Ic=100ua 
Collector Emitter Brakedown Voltage at Ic=500ua 
Collector Cutoff Current at Vcb=15v 
Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v Jc= 
Transducer Power Gain at Vce=18v 5 Ice-60ma 1 F=2GHz. 
Maximum Available Gain at Vce=18v 1 Ic=60ma > F=lGHz/F=2GHz 
Price $29.99 



35volts min, 

30volts min, 

lOOua max. 

15mi n ,40typ 9 125max 

3dBmin,4dBtyp 

14dB typ,8dB typ 



Motorola RF Power Amplifier Modules 



Model 


MHW612A 

146 to 147MHz 


MHW613A 

150 to 174MHz 


MHW710 

400 to 512MHz 


MHW720 


Frequency Range 


400 to 470MHz 


Voltage 


I2.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


Output Power 


20watts 


30watts 


13watts 


20watts 


Minimum Gain 


20dB 


20dB 


19.4dB 


2 ldB 


Harmonics 


-30dB 


-30dB 


40dB 


40dB 


RF Input Power 


400mw 


500mw 


250mw 


250mw 


Price 


$57.50 


$59.80 


$57.50 


$69.00 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



(fM^IJz elect rot\ic$ 



73Magazwe * April. 1982 161 



"TRANSISTORS 



55 



WATK1NS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Communication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ, 


5dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 




5.5dB Typ. 


, 6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MHz fL fR 

fl 880MHz fL fR 


SSB Noise Fiqure 




fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 




4.9dB Typ, 


, 6dB Max. fl 30 to 1125MHz fL fR 




5.5dB Typ, 


, 6.5dB Max. fl 880MHz fL fR 


Isolation 






fL at R 


30dB Min. 


40dB Typ. fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 


a at I 


25dB Hin. 


30dB Typ. fL 4.5 to 5.35GHz 




20dB Min. 


30dB Typ. fL 3.6 to 4.5GHz 




15dB Min. 


25dB Typ. fL 2.8 to 3.6GHz 


Conversion Compres 


sion IdB 1 


«lax. fR Level +2dBm 


Flatness 


.2dB 


Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GHz 


Third Order Input 


Intercept +lldBm fRl=4GHz fR2=4.0lGHz Both at -5dBm fL=4.5GHz 


Group Time Delay 


.5ns Typ. 


.75ns Max. fR3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 3480MHz 1? +13dBm 


VSWR 


L-Port 


1.25:1 Typ. 2.0:1 fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 




R-Port 


1.25:1 Typ. 2.0:1 fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 
1.4 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 




I -Port 


1.5 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 fI=100MHz 
1.3 :1 Typ. 2.0:1 fI=500MHz 
1.8 :1 Typ. 2.5:1 fI=1125MHz 


SGS/ATES RF Transistors 


Motorola RF Transistor 


Type. 


BFQ85 


BFW92 MRF901 2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 


25v 25v 25v 


Col lector Emitter 


V I5v 


15v 15v 15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 


2 . 5v 3v 3v 


Col lector Current 


40ma 


25ma 30ma 30ma 


Power Dissipation 


200mw 


190mw 375mw 400mw 


HFE 


40min, 200max. 20min. 150max. 30min, 200max. 30min. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ min. 


5GHz max. 1.6GHz Typ. 4.5GHz typ. 2GHz min. 


Noise Fiqure 


1GHz 3dB 


Max. 500MHz 4dB Typ. 1GHz 2dB Typ. 2GHz 2.9dB Typ. 


Price 


SI. 50 


$1.50 52.00 $10.00 


National Semiconductor Variable Voltage Regulator Sale !!!!!!!!! 


LM317K 


LM350K 


LM723G/L LM7805/06/08/12/15/18/24 


1.2 to 37vdc 


1.2 to 33 


vdc 2 to 37vdc 5, 6, 8,12, 15,18, 24vdc 


1 . 5Amps 


3 Amps 


150ma. lAmp 


TO-3 


T0-3 


TO-100/TO-116 T0-220/T0-3 


$4.50 


$5.75 


$1.00 $1.25 $1.17 $2.00 



P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



*May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7Amps 

20Amps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum.Heatsink with 
Silicon Grease $5.00 



(f)\f G IJz electronic* 



162 73 Magazine * April, 1962 



"MIXERS" 




WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2SC21 50 Microwave Transistor 

NF Min F=2GH2 dB 2.4 Typ. MAG F=2GHz dB 12 Typ. 

F=3GHz dB 3.4 Typ. F=3GHz dB 9 Typ. 

F=4GHz dB 4.3 Typ, F=4GHz dB 6.5 Typ. 

Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 



$5.30 



UNELCQ RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier manufactures 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 
13pf 
14pf 
20pf 



22pf 
25pf 
27pf 

27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 
62pf 
80pf 



lOOpf 
120pf 
180pf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .60* each 

820pf 11 to 50pcs. .50* each 

51 to lOOpcs. .40e each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 

Peak Pt. Current ma. Ip 

Valley Pt. Current ma. Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 

Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp Vf=Ip 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf. Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. VV 



MODEL 1S2199 

9inin. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
95Typ. 120max. 
480min. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ. 4max. 
1.7Typ. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 S7 ' 50 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
75Typ. 90max. 
440min. 520Typ. 60Qmax 
2Typ. 3max. 
5Typ, 8max. 
350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf., Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over 100MHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTORO LA RF DATA BOOK 

List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 

PRICE $7-50 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



JVI^z electronic* 






73Magazme ■ April, 1982 163 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EI MAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKllO 


Socket 


SK406 


Chimney 


SK416 


Chimney 


SK500 


Socket 


SK506 


Chimney 


SK600 


Socket 


SK602 


Socket 


SK606 


Chimney 


SK607 


Socket 


SK610 


Socket 


SK620 


Socket 


SK620A 


Socket 


JOHNSON 


TUBE SOCKETS 



124-115-2/SK620A Socket 
124-116/SK630A Socket 



S POR 
35.00 

22.00 
330.00 
47.00 
39.50 
56.00 
8.80 
43.00 
44.00 
45.00 
50.50 



$ 30.00 
40.00 



SK626 


Chimney 


SK530 


Socket 


SK636B 


Chimney 


SK640 


Socket 


SK646 


Chimney 


SK7UA 


Socket 


SK740 


Socket 


SK770 


Socket 


SK800A 


Socket 


SK806 


Chimney 


SK900 


Socket 


SK906 


Chimney 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 
(For 4-250A,4-400A,3-400Z, 
3-500Z) 



7.70 

45.00 
26.40 
27.50 
55.00 

192.50 
66.00 
66.00 

150.00 
30.80 

253.00 
44.00 



$ 10.00 

10.00 

2/S15.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

♦ 8pf 

lpf 

l.lpf 

l-4pf 
1.5pf 
1.8pf 
2.2pf 
2.7pf 
3.3pf 
3.6pf 
3.9pf 
4.7pf 
5.6pf 
6.8pf 
8.2pf 



PRICES: 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 

18pf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 
51pf 
56pf 
68pf 
82pf 

99t 

90* 

,80c 



lOOpf* 

llOpf 

120pf 

130pf 

150pf 

160pf 

180pf 

200pf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 
470pf 

510pf 
560pf 
620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOluf* 

1800pf/.0018uf 

2700pf/.0027uf 

10,000pf/.01uf 

12,000pf/.012uf 

15,000pf/,015uf 

18,000pf/.018uf 



101 to 1000 
1001 & UP 



.60<t 
.35e 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 



10 for $7.50 
100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350.00 



WATKINS JOHNSON HJ-V907 : Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4,2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nf ), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical, Residual FM, pk to pk, Max. 5KHz, pushing factor, Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current, Max. -0.1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance, Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Max. 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



(fJM^z electroi\ic$ 



164 73Magazme * April, 1982 



"TUBES" 



PRICE 



TUBES 



TUBES 

2E26 
2K28 
3B28 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z/8164 

3CX1000A/8283 

3X2500A3 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5D22 

4-400A/8438 

4-400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4CS250R 

4X150A/7034 

4X150D/7035 

4X150G 

4X250B 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/7204 

4CX250FG/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350FJ/8904 

4X500A 

4CX600J 

4CX1000A/8168 

4CX1500B/8660 

4CX3000A/8169 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX10000D/8171 

4CX15000A/8281 

4E27/A/5-123A/B 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

KT88 
DX362 
DX415 
572B/T160L 

811 

811A 

812A 

813 

4624 

4665 

5551A 

5563A 

5675 



NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



PRICE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



$ 4.69 


5721 


100.00 


5768 


5.00 


5836 


102.00 


5837 


300.00 


5861/EC55 


200. 00 


5876A 


200. 00 


5881/6L6 


45.00 


5894/A 


58.00 


5894B 


68.00 


6080 


71.00 


6083/AX9909 


80.00 


6098/ 6AK6 


300.00 


6115/A 


69.00 


6146 


30.00 


6146A 


40.00 


6146B/8298A 


50.00 


6146W 


30.00 


6159 


45.00 


6161 


45.00 


6291 


55.00 


6293 


100. 00 


6360 


69.00 


6524 


99.00 


6550 


100.00 


6562/6794A 


100.00 


6693 


100.00 


6816 


300.00 


6832 


300.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


300.00 


6884 


300.00 


6897 


400.00 


6900 


500.00 


6907 


700.00 


6939 


40.00 


7094 


100.00 


7117 


175.00 


7211 


15.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


35.00 


7360 


35.00 


7377 


44.00 


7486 


10.00 


7650 


13.00 


7843 


15,00 


7868 


38.00 


7984 


100.00 


8072 


350.00 


8121 


100.00 


8122 


77.00 


8236 


15.00 


8295/PL172 



$200.00 


8462 




$100.00 


85.00 


8505A 




73.50 


100.00 


8533W 




92.00 


100.00 


8560A 




55.00 


110.00 


8560AS 




57.00 


15.00 


ouOo 




34.00 


5.00 


8624 




67.20 


45.00 


8637 




38.00 


55.00 


8647 




123.00 


10.00 


8737/5894B 


55.10 


89.00 


8807 




1000. 00 


14.00 


8873 




260.00 


100.00 


8874 




260.00 


6.00 


8875 




260.00 


6.50 


8877 




533.00 


7.50 


8908 




12.00 


14.00 


8916 




1500.00 


11.00 


8930/X651Z 


45.00 


70.00 
125.00 


8950 




10.00 








20.00 


6BK4C 




5.00 


4.00 


6DQ5 




4.00 


53.00 


6FW5 




5.00 


7.00 


6GE5 




5.00 


25.00 


6GJ5 




5.00 


110.00 


6HS5 




5.00 


58.00 


6JB5/6HE5 


5.00 


22.00 


6JB6A 




5.00 


7.00 


6JM6 




5.00 


46.00 


6JN6 




5.00 


110.00 


6JS6B 




5.00 


35.00 


6JT6A 




5.00 


55.00 


6KD6 




5.00 


15.00 


6K66/EL505 


5.50 


75.00 


6KM6 




5.00 


17.00 


6KN6 




5.00 


60.00 


6LF6 




6.00 


34.00 


6Lq6 




6.00 


11.00 


6LU8 




5.00 


67.00 


6LX6 




5.00 


75.00 


6ME6 




5.00 


250.00 


12JB6A 




6.00 


58.00 

4.00 

12.00 


"WE ARE 


ALSO 


LOOKING FOR 


TUBES NEW/USED ECT." 


55.00 
50.00 


WE BUY 


SELL 


OR TRADE 


85.00 








30.00 








300.00 








i i i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 it 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



(SJVl^l^z elect rot\ic$ 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 165 



— — 



F 



TEKTRONIX OSCILLOSCOPES 


PRICE 


MODEL 453 Portable 50 MHz 




Dual Trace 


S1200.00 


MODEL 453A Portable 60 MHz 




Dual Trace 


S140000 


MODEL 454 Portabl* ISO MHz 




Dual Trace 


51 BOOM 


MODEL 4S4A Portable 150 MHz 




Dual Trace 


S2000DO 


MODEL 455 Portable SO MHz 




Dual Trace 


$180000 


MODEL 475 Portable 200 MHz 




Dual Trace 


$2640.00 


MODEL 475 A Portable 250 MHz 




Dual Trace 


$2940.00 


MODEL 7514 Storage Oscilloscope 




with a 7Ai5A and a 7AiSAN-n Amplifier 




and a 7B50 Time Base 


S3500.00 


MODEL S77D1 Storage Curve Tracer 




with a 1 77 adapter 


$3233.00 


MODEL 577D2 Curve Tracer 




with a 177 adapter 


$2746.00 


Tektronix Lab Cart Model 3 


$ 316.00 



MODEL 547 50 MHz Bench Scope. 

VVitti a 1 A 1 Dual Trace. 
vVilha 1A2 Dual Trace 
With a 1A4 Quad Trace 
Wilha lASDifieremtai 
Wifh a 1A6 Differential 
or with 1 of eac h above 

MODEL 545 30 MHz Bench Scope 
wil h a CA Dual Trace 

MODEL 545 A 30 MHz Bench Scope 
with aCA DualTrace 



S 722 50 
$ 637 50 
S 672 50 
$ 722.50 
$ 61250 
$1687 50 

$ 412 50 

$ 437 50 



MODEL 544 50 MHz Bench Scope 

with a CA Dual Trace $ 650,50 

MODEL 543A 33 MHz Bench Scope 

with a CA Dual Trace 

HEWLETT PACKARD OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL 180A Main Frame 

MODEL 1S0E Main Frame. 

MODEL 181 A Main Frame. 

MODEL 1 82A Main Frame. 

MODEL 183A Mam Frame. 

MODEL taO SERIES PLUG-INS 
1S01A Dual Trace 50 MHz. 
T&Q3A Differential 

1604A Quad Trace 50 MHz 

1807A Dual Tf ace 50 MHz 

1815A TDR'Sampler with a 1616A DC to 4 
GHz 

1821 A Trme Base S Delay Generator 

1822A Time Base & Delay Generator 

1B31A Direct Access 600 MHz ' 

1340 A Time Base & Delay Generator ' 

1841 a Time Base & Delay Generator ' 

'For 183AOniy !<«!!!" 

TELEQUIPMENT MODEL DB3 Oscilloscope 

Dual Trace Portable 50 MHz With a V4 and S2A Plug-In $1 200.00 

DUMONT MODEL 1062 Oscilloscope 

Dual Trace 65 MHz portable. $ 750.00 

TEKTRONIX 

MODEL RM565 Dual Beam Oscilloscope 

10 MHz with a 3A6 Dual Trace and a 3A72 Dual Trace $1107.50 

MODEL 549 Storage Oscilloscope 

Bench 50 MHz w4h a CA Dual Trace $1000.00 

MODEL S47A Oscilloscope 

Bench 100 MHz with a 10A2 Dual Trace 

a no a 1 1B2A T^me Base $1 200.00 



s 


475.50 


PRICE 


$ 


675.00 


$ 


75000 


$1000 00 


$ 


90000 


$1000.00 


s 


495,00 


$ 


775.00 


$ 


795.00 


$ 


375.00 


$1500,00 


s 


495,00 


$ 


525.00 


$ 


200,00 


$ 


450.00 


$ 


675.00 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 
DEFECTIVE MATERIAL: AM claims for defective materia! must be made within sixty (60) days after receipt of 
parcel. All claims must include the defective material (for testing purposes), our invoice number, and the date 
of purchase. All returns must be packed properly or it will void all warranties, 

DELIVERY: Orders are normally shipped within 48 hours after receipt of customer's order. If a part has to be 
backordered the customer Is notified, Our normal shipping method is via First Class Mail or UPS depending on 
size and weight of the package, On test equipment it is by Air only, FOB shipping point. 

FOREIGN ORDERS: All foreign orders must be prepaid with cashier's check or money order made out in U.S. 
Funds. We are sorry but 0*0. D. is not available to foreign countries and Letters of Credit are not an acceptable 
form of payment either. Further information is available on request. 

HOURS: Monday thru Saturday: 8:30 a,m. to 5:00 p,m. 

INSURANCE: Please include 25<t for each additional $100.00 over $100.00, United Parcel only. 

ORDER FORMS: New order forms are included with each order for your convenience. Additional forms are 
available on request. 

POSTAGE: Minimum shipping and handling in the US, Canada, and Mexico is $2.50 all other countries is $5,00. 
On foreign orders include 20% shipping and handling. 

PREPAID ORDERS: Order must be accompanied by a check. 

PRICES: Prices are subject to change without notice. 

RESTOCK CHARGE: If parts are returned to MHZ Electronics due to customer error, customer will be held 
responsible for ail extra fees, will be charged a 15% restocking fee, with the remainder in credit only. AH returns 
must have approval. 

SALES TAX: Arizona must add 5% sales tax, unless a signed Arizona resale tax card is currently on file with 
MHZ Electronics. All orders placed by persons outside of Arizona, but delivered to persons in Arizona are sub* 
ject to the 5% sales tax. 

SHORTAGE OR DAMAGE: All claims for shortages or damages must be made within 5 days after receipt of 
parcel, Claims must include our invoice number and the date of purchase. Customers which do not notify us 
within this time period will be held responsible for the entire order as we will consider the order complete, 

OUR 800 NUMBER IS STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY 
NO INFORMATION WILL BE GIVEN. 1 -800-528-01 80 k 



166 73 Magazine • April 1982 



FAIRCHILD 

95H90DC 

95H91DC 

11C90DC 

11C910C 

11C06DC 

11C05DC 

11C01FC 

82S90 



11C24DC 



11C44DC 



VHF AND UH F PRESCAL ER CHIPS 
350MC Prescaler divide by 10/1 1 
350MC Prescaler divide by 5/6 
S60MC Prescaler divide by 10M 1 
650 MC Prescaier divide by 5/6 
UHF Prescaler 750MC D Type Flip Flop 
1GHz Counter Divide by 4 
(Regular price S75.00) 
High Speed Dual 5/4 Input NO/NORGate 
Preset! able High Speed Decade/Binary 
Counter used with the 11C90791 or ihe 
95H90/91 Prescaler can divide by 100. 
(Signet icsj 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4Q24/4324 Dual TTL Voltage Control 
Multivibrator, 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4044/4344 Phase Frequency Detector, 



PRICE 

S 8,50 

8.50 

15.50 
1550 
12:30 

50.00 
15.40 



HEWLETT PACKARD 
MIXERS MODELS 
Frequency Range 

inpuNOutput Frequency L & R 



Mixer Conversion Loss {A) 

Noise Performance (SSBl (A) 

(B) 
PRICE 



10514A 

2MHz to 500MC 

200KHZ to 

500 MC 

DC to 500MC 

7dB 

9dB 

7dB 

9dB 

S49.99 PRICE 



10514S 
2MHz to 

500MC 

200KHZ to 

500MC 

DC to 500M C 

7dB 

9dB 

7dB 

9dB 

539 99 



5.00 

3.37 
3.37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. GUNN DIODE MODEL Y 2167 
Freq Gap (GHZ) 12 to 18, Output fMin.) lOOmW, Duty (%) 
CW, Typ~ Bias (Vdc) 8.0. Type. Oper. (MAdc) 550. Max. Thres. 
(mAdc) 1000. Max. Bias {Vdc) 10 0. $39.99 

VARIAN GALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX 92Q1S5 
Freq Coverage 8 to 12.4GHz. Output (Minj lOQmW. Bias 
Voltage (Max.) 14¥dc, Bias current {mAdc) Operating 550 Typ, 
750 Max , Threshold 850 Tup. 1000 Max $39-99 

VARI L Co. Inc. MODEL SS 43 AM MODULATOR 

Freq Range 60 10 150MC. Insertion Loss 13dB Nominal, 
Signal Port Imp SOohms Nominal. Siqnai Port RF Power 
+ tOdBm Max . Modulation Port BW DC to 1KHZ, Modulation 
Port Bias Ima Nominal, $24.99 



AVANTEK CASCADABLE 
MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 



Model UTO-504 UTO-51 1 



Frequency Range 


5 to 500 MHz 


5 to 500 MH* 


Gam 


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15dB 


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Power Output 


+ 17dB 




-2dB to 
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idB 




IdB 


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+ 24 




+ 15 


mA 


100 




10 




PRICE $70.00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



FREQUENCY SOURCES. INC MODEL MS-74X 

MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS-74X: Mechanically Tunable Frequency Range {MHzJ 10630 !© 

1 1230 (10 63 to 11.23GHz) Minimum Output Power (mW) 10, Overall 

Multiplier Ratio 108, Internal Crystal Osciliator Frequency Range 

(MHz) 98.4 to 104.0, Maximum Input Current (mA} 400. 

The signal source are designed for applications where high stability 
and low noise are of prime concern ihese sources uiilize fundamen- 
tal transistor oscillators with high Q coaxial cavities, followed by 
broadband stable step recovery diode multipliers. This design 
allows single screw mechanical adjustment of frequency over stan- 
dard communications bands Broadband sampling circuits are used 
to phase lock the oscillator to a high stability reference which may 
be either an internal self-contained crystal oscillator, external 
primary standard or VHF synthesizer This unique technique allows 
for optimization of both FM noise and long term stability Lis! Price 
is Si 158,00 (THESE are NEW) Our Price— $289. 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1N5712 MICROWAVE DIODE 

This diode will replace the MBO101. TN5711 T 5082-2800, 

5062 2835 ect This will work like a champ in all those 

Down Converter projects. $1.50 or 107$ 10.00 

MOTOROLA MHW1172R LOW DISTORTION 

WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE. 

Frequency Range: 40 to 300 MHz , Power Gain at 50MHz 

I6.6min. to I7.4max.. Gam Flatness ±0.1 Typ. ±0,2 

Ma*. dB., DC Supply Voltage -28vdc. RF Voltage Input 

+ 70dBmV PRICE $29.99 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 

Model #41B905HD11 G1 

Pack of 6 for 55.00 or 60 Cells, 10 Packs for $45.00 

These may be broken down to individual cells. 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

TERMS; DOMESTIC: Prepaid, C.O.D. or Credit Card 

FOREIGN: Prepaid only, U.S. Funds— money order or cashier's check only. 

C.O.D.: Acceptable by telephone or mail. Payment from customer will be by cash, money order or cashier's 
check. We are sorry but we cannot accept personal checks for C.O.D.'s. 

CONFIRMING ORDERS: We would prefer that confirming orders not be sent after a telephone order has been 
placed, If company policy necessitates a confirming order, please mark "CONFIRMING" boldJy on the order. 
If problems or duplicate shipments occur due to an order which is not properly marked, customers will be 
held responsible for any charges incurred, plus a 15% restock charge on returned parts. 

CREDIT CARDS: We are now accepting Mastercard and Visa. 

DATA SHEETS: When we have data sheets in stock on devices we do supply them with the order. 



aM'H; 



electronic* 



S*B 



(602) 242-3037 
(602)242-8916 

2111 W. CAM EL BACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 

Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



h 



i 



**$ee Ust of Advertisers on page ?30 



73 Magazine * April, 1982 167 




MC/ 



FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



ELECTRONICS 



i^60 



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LM317K 3 75 qnflfe 

.'.I-'! 1 flFl CD4C1R 

LMJMK-fl | 35 CD4GJ-3 

LH32AK-12 1 35 CD4D2I 

IP4370KO5 I 35 CD4022 

LMKD76 H5- CQ40i3 

LM52DT-fi .H& CD4Q2J 

LWHOT-IZ ,B& CQ4MS 

LM32DT-W .15 CJM026 

LM323HW 4.9S E044J27 

LM324N .69 C.0*D2S 

■:> ■.<.-■ 'j ■ ■■■ ..L i-::jv 

UMMW-1 V35 CP4K5 

LVflLMUh.-l2 1.35 CD4Q4J3 

LM34C1K.-15 1.35 CD4D42 

LM34UK.-24 1.35 CD4Q4-3 

LMH40T-5 ,75 CD4QM 

LM34JDT& .T5 HD4G4JJ 

;.M:JWT-\2 75 CD464y 

tMJWT-tS 75 CP4DM1 

I.M3*DT-1fi 75 CQ4D5I 

LM340T-2* .?s cg4QW 

LttSfin 5 5fl CD40B& 

I M377 £ a) CD4QBB 

LMHDH 1 ffij COttfiD 

I.W3BJ Mjfl ttsvain 

wm? i.eo hmwi 

LM7&9N 5fl £EMO?£ 

!"":V-N :;i CD4D7-3 

LHTD3hl B5 i:5*07.'i 

LW741* .35 CD4fl7£ 

LiflTtlN 35 C04n7S 

LM747H-W 75 CD4061 

LMM6PJ 5U CD4(HU 

lMSjAHN I 75 CD4t16 

^M'534 1 IB CD44M 

LM13D5 1.?7 CD4507 

0*1 W I IB CD4KIH 

lmi3iu its co4sin 

;Mu&n V, CP4511 

LMlfltf B.25 CD4A15 

IM1BBS 2hM CP451B 

LM£1l! 1.75 CD441A 

\U?W. 2 25 CU452C 

l^33WJ« .59 C&4527 

IMMB |.!5 CD452H 

LM3QPW 95 CCH&53 

MCt45BV 55 C&*58* 

NEffflN I 30 CCH5BA 

NEiSSV .JS C045B5 

NF556A i ; i CD4n?92 

NEifibA t DC1 74CHO 

NtSOW 3.50 7+C&4, 

NE5BTV 1 ffil' 7*5.10 

NF57DS 4 75 T*tl4 

f*LH5 .eo 7*«o 

751 HB 60 MHO 

?EM0i .*5 7iQiB 

M'ii Ug 74JC74 

7&191CN .sa MCW 

754931CN c .5 MCM 

7&494CN flft 7«C93 

Aid D CDNVERTEfli 74Q1BO 



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CD4O07 
CD400R 
CD4009 
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MMS3M *.95 

MM53M1 5.94 

PSiail S95 

■^L.i" 11 50 

9368 ■- vi 

41 00 :■ S) 

41E ?50 

TWM201B 1 6.55 

HM611B tiM 

CU&CKS 

MM-531! 4 06 

MM&J12 3.90 

MU5314 3.90 

MM53ES 1.55 

UU5B41 U.45 

MH50E$ . f .^5 

CT7010 9 95 

CT7BIS E95 

MM5375AAW 3 9° 
MM537$i&M 4.90 
J205 16.50 

TOT ?.;.o 

7203 53.95 

7209 4.95 

MFCAQPR0CES50R 
5.95 
9.50 
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■1 7E 



PflCM 

17IKA 

252? 

27W 

27;eni 

2716 5^11 

9.2716 5V:ill 

2732 

2T56 

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N&25123 
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2 95 

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5.75 

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6.75 

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2.99 

3.59 



DS95 
DA15P 
DA IBS 
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1.95 
2.19 
3J0 
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Sl^puflch Kit J6.95 
Hti\i Clack Nil 17. »5 
BHg(ti3 Cl*rt Kit 19.76 

l r ESI:1UHj ■■ -JlrV. 



lOpef tif^p 

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159.95 



'+ will 5^ j»r tvp« <Qb 

DIP SWITCHES 
: L' :;-:■!■;■- 

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IC SOCKETS 
Sfllcut Tin U/wf P»me 



PIN 

14 
16 
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20 



1UP 
13 
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PIN 

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280* BUM) 

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2KJAS16V1 

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hillf- ai^ti'ililtd 94 5B 

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Junta Rod .25 

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2 5 M44,- F-Tn Cauirttr Kl| 37.50 

30 HHi Freoj. Cnurlei Kit 4775 



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1 WHe 
2WH1 
4 MHZ 
5MWi 

10 Mm 
10 Mttt 

20 MHz 
.32 hfHl 
327W h; 

1 B432 MH.' 
3.5795 Mhi 

2 0109 MKi 
2.867152 MHr 
f.4576 MM! 
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5 LftHB MH; 
5.165 MHr 
5 '143 MH; 
6.5535 '.in; 
14 31618 MKf 
1B 432- MHI 
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4-50 
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3.90 

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1 20 
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3.95 
3.9S 
3-96 
3 95 
3.95 
395 
3 95 
3 95 
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FHAHf 

5V 600 itj &4 90 

6 3V CT 600 ma 4 60 

12V 250 mj I 95 

12.*W CT 6M ma 4 05 

12 n"Y£T J-.linp* 5 95 

12 (W ST 4" amp 6 60 

12 5YOB;liim 10 JD 

24V CT 100 ni 3.95 

24V CT 500 nu 4.9S 



WALL PUIG 
10V2amp t7.95 
12 V 250 mi 2.95 
12V ^250mi 3.76 
12V 508 m? 4 50 
1JV 1 amp 
12V 3wip 
6. 9. 12 VM 

300 m B.95 
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S.95 
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HETBUARD EHC09ERS 



AV5^17? 
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17 to 

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0R25S 3 50 

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OlSPI AV LEOS 

IWN7ZM 

DL704 

Dt707.iOL;Ci7R 

OL727.72B 

OL747.-750 

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HM4474D 
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41 1 5 200ns Dy nam ic RAM 8 S1 5 .40 



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$*5,&5. Kit (P.'W 120A) Sfifl.95. 
Interface Kits 

SERIAL-PARALLEL INTERFACE Bidirectional, 
Baud rates from 110 to t9.2K, sw selectable 
polarity of input and output strobe, 5 to 8 data 
bits, t or 2 stop bits, parity odd or even or none, 
all characters contain a start bit. +5 & -12V 
required. Bd only (P/N 101) $11.15, Kit {P/N 
101 A) $42.89. 

RS-232/TTL INTERFACE Bidirectional, re- 
quires ± 12V, Kit (P/N 232A) $9.95, 
RS~232/20mA INTERFACE Bidirectional, 2 
passive opto-tsolated circuits. Kit (P/N 7901 A) 
$14,95. 

PROM Eraser 

Will erase 25 PRGMs in 15 minutes. Ultraviolet, 
assembled. 25 PROM capacity $37.50 (with 
timer SG9.5Q). 6 PROM Capacity OSHA/UL ver- 
sion $78.50 (with timer $108,50}. 

NiCad Battery Fixer/Charger Kit 

Opens shorted celts that won't hold a charge and 
then charges irvem up. all in one kit w/lull parts 
and instructions. No PC board, $8.45 



Z80 Microcomputer 

16 bit VO t 2 MHz clock, 2K RAM, ROM Bread- 
board space. Excellent for control- Bare Board 
S2B.5D, Full Kit $9900. Monitor $20,00. Power 
Supply Kit $35.00. Tiny Basic $30.00. 

Modem Kit $60.00 

State of the art, o rig., answer. No tuning neces- 
sary. 103 compatible 300 baud, Inexpensive 
acoustic coupler plans included. Bd. only 
$17.00. Article in June ffatf/'o Etectronics. 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 

Converts digital clocks from AC line frequency to 
crystal time base. Outstanding accuracy. 

Video Modulator Kit $9.95 

Convert TV set into a high quality monitor w/o 
affecting usage. Com p. kit w/full instruc. 

Multi-volt Computer Power Supply 

8v 5 amp, ±18v .5 amp, 5v 1.5 amp. -5v 
.5 amp, 12v .5 amp, -12v option. ±5v, ±12v 
are regulated. Basic Kit $35,95, Kit with chassis 
and all hardware $51,95, Add S5.00 shipping. Kit 
of hardware $16.00. Woodgrain case $10.00. 
S1 .50 shipping 

Type-N-Talk by Votrax 

Text to speech synthesizer with unlimited vocabu- 
lary, built-in text to speech algorithm, 70 to 100 
bits per second speech synthesiser, RS232C 
interface $359.00. Speech IC $79.95. 

1802 1SK Dynamic RAM Kit $149.00 

Expandable to 64K. Hidden refresh w/clocks up to 

4 MHz w/no wart states. Addl. 16K RAW $25.00. 

5 100 4-siDt expansion $ 9.95 
Super Monitor VI. I Source listing $1500 



I 



mmmmmm 
Virargig 



RCA Cosmac 1802 
Super Elf Computer $106.95 

Toe Super Elf is a small single board computer mat 
does many big things. It's an excellent computer 
lor training and for learning programming with its 
machine language and yet it's easily expanded 
with additional memory, Full Basic, ASCII 
Keyboards, video character generation, etc. 

ROM monitor; State and Mode displays, Single 
step; Optional address dismays; Power Supply; 
Audio Amplifier and Speaker, Fully socketed for all 
IC h s; Full docomentatton. 

Trie Super EM includes a ROM monitor for pn> 
gram loading, edrting and execution with SINGLE 
STEP for p^gram debugging which is not in- 
cluded in others at the same price. With SINGLE 
STEP you can see the microprocessor chip oper- 
ating with the unique Quest address and data bus 
displays before, during and after executing in- 
structions. AJ$o = CPO mode and instruction cycle 
are decoded and displayed on S LED indicators. 

An RCA 1861 video graphics chip allows you to 

connect to your own TV with an inexpensive video 
modufcator to do graphics and games. There is a 
speaker system included for writing your own 
music or using many musio programs already 
written. The speaker amplifier may also be used to 
drive relays for control purposes. 

A 24 key HEX keyboard includes 16 HEX keys plus 
load, reset, run, wait, input, memory protect, 
monitor select and single step Large, on board 

displays provide output and optional high and low 
address. There is a 44 pin standard connector slot 



Quest Super Basic V5.0 

A new enhanced version of Super Basic now 
available. Quest was the first company worlctwrrie 
to ship a full size Basic Tor 1602 Systems. A 
complete function Super Basic by Ron Cenker 
including floating point capability with scientific 
nutation (number range +.17E 38 }, 32 bit inleger 
±2 billion; mulli dim arrays, string arrays: string 
manipulation: cassette I/O, save and load, basic, 
data and machine language programs: and over 
75 statements, functions and operations. 
New improved laster version including re- 
number and essentially unlimited variables 
Also, an exclusive user expandable comirrano 
library 

Serial and Parallel I/O routines included 
Super Basic on Cassette $55.00. 



for PC cards and a 50 pin connector slat for the 
Quest Super Expansion Board , Power supply and 
sockets for all IC's are included plus a detailed 
127 pg. instruction manual which now includes 
over 40 pgs of software info, including a series of 
lessons to help get you started and a music pro- 
gram and graphics target game. Many schools 
and universities are using the Super Elf as a 
course of study, OEM's use it for training and 
RfiD. 

Remember, other computers only offer Super Etf 
features at additional cost or not at ail. Compare 
before you buy. Super Elf Kit $106.95. High 
address option $8,95, Low address option 
$9.95. Custom Cabinet with drilled and labelled 
plexiglass front panel $24.95, All metal Expansion 
Cabinet, painted and silk screened, with room for 
5S-10D boards and power supply $57.00. NlCad 
Battery Memory Saver Kit $0.95. All kits and 
options also completely assembled and tested. 

Qoestdata, $ software publication for 1602 com- 
puter users is available by subscription tor $1 2.00 
per 12 issues, Single Issues $1.50. Issues 1-1 2 
bound $16.50. 

Moews Video Graphics $3 .50,, Games and Music 
1 3. (HI f Chip & Interpreter $5.5fl h Starship 4K cas- 
sette $14.95, Exciting and challenging space 
game. Complete manual included. 

Free 14 page brochure 

of complete Super Elf system. 



Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interlace $89.95 

This is truly an astounding value \ Trips board has gram bugs quickly, then follow with single step, tf 

been designed to allow you to decide how you you have the Super Expansion Board and Super 

want it optioned. The Super Expansion Board Monitor the monitor is up and running at the push 

comes with 4K of low power HAM fully address- of a button. 



able anywhere in 64K with built-in memory pro- 
tect and a cassette interface. Provisions have 
been made for all other options on the same board 
and it fits neatly into the hardwood cabinet 
alongside the Super Elf. The board includes slots 
for up to 6K of EPflOH [2708, 2758, 2716 orTI 
271 6) and is Hilly socketed. EPROM can be used 
for the monitor and Tiny Basic or other purposes. 



Other on board options include Parallel Input and 
Output Porls with foil handshake They allow easy 
connection of an ASCII keyboard to the input port, 
AS 232 and 20 ma Current Loop for teletype or 
other device are on board and if you need more 
memory there are two S-100 slots for static RAM 
or video boards. Also a 1K Super Monilor version 
2 with video driver for full capability display with 



A IK Super HOM Monitor $19, 95 is available as an Tiny Basic and a video interface board . Parallel 

on board option in 2708 EPROM which has been I/O Ports $9,85, RS 232 S4.50, TTY 20 ma f/F 

preprogrammed wrth a program loader/editor and $1.96, S-100 $4.50. A 50 pin connector set with 

error checking multi file cassette read/write ribbon cable is available at $19. 95 for easy con- 
software, (relocatable cassette file) another exciu- nection between the Super Elf and the Super 
sive from Quest. It Includes register save and Expansion Board, 

readout, block move capability and video graphics p,^, $ypp|» Kj | for ^ com n|ete system (see 

driver wrm blinking cursor. Break points, can be MulthvoSt Power Supply below) 
used with the register save feature to isolate pro- 



Rockwell AIM 65 Computer 

550^ based single board wrth lull ASCII keyboard 
and 20 column thermal printer. 20 char, alphanu- 
meric display ROM monitor:, fully expandable. 
$419.00. 4K version $449. DO 4K Assembler 
$35.00. BK Basic Interpreter S65.00 

Special small power supply 5V 2 A 24V ,5A 
assem in frame $59-00. Molded plastic 
enclosure to fit boih AIM 65 and power supply 
$52.50. AIM 65 1K in cahinet with power supply, 
switch, fuse, cord assem $559.00. 4K $579.00. 
A65 40-5000 AIM 65-40 W/1GK RAM and monitor 
$1295,00. RAM Board Kit (16K. $195) (32K, 
1215). VD640 Vadeo Interface Kit $119,00, A&T 
S149.00. Complete AIM 65 in thin bnetcasa with 
power supply $518.00. Special Package Price 4K 
AIM, BK Basic, power suppty, cabinet $629.00 

AIM 65/KlM/SYM/Super Elt 44 pin expansion 
board, -board with 3 connectors $22,95. 



**i ._ ** 



**Wta^. 



Mr. 



Elf II Adapter Kit $24.95 

Plugs into Elf II providing Super Elf 44 and 50 pin 
plus S-100 bus expansion. (With Super Ex- 
pansion). High and low address displays, state 
and mode LEDs optional $18.00. 



Super Color S-100 Video Kit $129.95 

Expandable to 256 x 192 high resolution color 
graph ics. 6847 with all display modes computer 
controlled. Memory mapped. 1K RAM expand- 
able to 6K. S-100 bus 1802, 8080, 8085, Z80, 
etc. Dealers: Send for excellent pricing margin 
program, 



TERMS: $5.00 min. order U.S. Funds. Calif, residents add f}% tax. p r j ces 

$10.00 min. VISA and MasterCard accepted, $1.00 insurance optional. subject 
Shipping; Add 5%; orders under $25.00—10%. to change 



FREE: Send for your copy of our NEW 1982 
QUEST CATALOG. Include 98c stamp. 



168 73 Magazine * April, 1982 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 

%m Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodses too 
good to bypass Items are limited so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

716-586-3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO- 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A super high performance FM wife- 
less mike kit' Transmits a stable 
signal up to 300 yards with excep- 
tional audio quaMy by means of its 
buill in eiectrel mike Kit includes 
case, rmke, on-off switch antenna 
battery and super rn si rue (to/is Trus 
is the finest unit available 

FM-3 Kil $14.95 

FM-3 Wired and Tested 19,95 



Color Organ 

See music come 
alive! 3 deferent 
lights flicker with 
music. One Jjght 
each for, high. 
mid-range and 
lows Each indi- 
vidually adjust- 
able and drives up 
lo 300 W runs on 
110 VAC 

Complete kit, 
ML-1 
$6:95 



Vld*d Modulilor Kil 
Cpnvffts any TV to video monitor Sup Err 
stable. tunatHQ over ch 4-6 flurit d 1 ii- 
1 5 V. accepts std video signal Besfunnon 
me marke-n Compiele kit VD-i J7.S5 



Led Slinky KH 
A t/real altentiOn Met- 
ier which alternately 
Hashes 2 jumbo LEDs 
Use tor name badges. 
buttons, warning 
panel lights, anything" 
Runs on 3 to 15 vol Is 
Complete kit. BL-i 
$295 




Super Sleuth 

A super sensitiveampJi- 
fier which will pick up a 
pin drop at 15 feet! 1 Great 
for monitoring baby's 
room or as generaf pur- 
pose amplifier Full 2 W 
rms output runs on 6 to 
15 volts uses 8-45 ohm 

speaker 
Complete kit. SN-S 

$5,95 




CPO-1 

Runs on 3-12 Vdc 1 wall out. I KHZ qood forCPO, 

Alarm Audio Oscillalor Complete ktl $2,95 



Call Your Phone Order in Today 
TERMSfc Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded. GOD. add $2.00. Minimum order 
S6.O0. Orders under $10.00 add $1.50. Add 5% 
tor postage, insurance, handling. Overseas 
add 15%. ISI.V. residents add 7% tax. 



CLOCK KITS 

Your old favorltei are here again. Over 7,000 Sold to Date, 
Be one ol the gang and order yours today! 

Try your hand at buifding rhe finest Fooking clock on the 
market Its satin finish anodized aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, while six A" LED digits provide a highly readable 
drsplay. This is a complete ktt. no extras needed and it only 
lakes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors: 
silver, gold, black (specify). 

Clock kit. 12/24 hour. DC-5 $24.95 

Clock with 10 min ID timer. 12/24 hour. DC-10 $29,95 

Alarm clock 12 hour only DC-8 $29.95 

12V DC car clock. DC-7 $29.95 

For wired and tested cfocks add S10.QG to kit price. 
SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 




FM Wireless Mike Kit 

Transmits up lo300 lo 
any FM broadcast ra- 
dio, uses any lype of 
mike Runs on 3 to 9V Type FM-2 
has added sensitive rmke preamp 
stage 

FM 1 kit $3.95 FM-2 kit $4.95 



Universal Timer Kit 

Provides (he basic parts and PC 
board required to provide a source 
ol preeiSrOin timing and puiae 
general ion Uses 555 timer fC and 
includes a range of parts for most 
liming needs 

UT-5 Kit $5.95 



Whisper Light Kit 

An Interesting kit. small mike 
picks up sounds and converts 
them to fight The louder the 
sound, the brighter the light 
Includes mike, controls up to 
300 W. runs on 170 VAC. 
Complete kit. WL-1 
$6.95 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produces LOUD ear shattering and 
aMention getting siren like sound 
Can supply up to T5 waats of 
obnoxious audio Runs on 6-15 VDC 



MB-1 Kit 



$4 95 




Tone Decoder 

A complete lone deco- 
der on a single PC 
board Features 400- 
5000 H7 adiustable 
range v<a 20 turn pot. vottage regu- 
lation 567 IC Useful ior touch- 
tone burst detection. FSK etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on 5 to 1? volts 
Complete Kit TD-i $5-95 



Car Clock 

The UN'KIT, only 5 solder connections 



Siren Kit 

Produces upward and downward 

wail characteristic of a police 

siren, 5 W peak audio output, runs 

on 3-15 volts, uses 3-45 ohm 

speaker 

Complete kit, SM-3 $2.95 



SO Hi Time Bate 
Runs or 5- I & JOC Law f-.ufrfrfit \2 ^fri^t 1 
mnvmomri jecu'fjfcpjf 1°1 K t fS.SO 

rp ? A^y t? as 



Hore s a super looking, rugged ar>o accurate as.no clock whrcb 15 a snap to putld and 
<nsiaii Clock movcfnetn is cpfnptswly assembled ■■ you o^iy sower a wnes anri ? 
switches takes about T5 minutes' Display = 5 brigiht green wilfi automalnr brightness 
control photocell assures yuu of a hughiy readable display day Or rug hi Comes <n a 
satin finish anodized aluminum casewhicti ca^beaUactiecf&difFerenrwiiy^LJsangJs'ded 
lap* Cripi'ci of siker blacfc or gold case (specify! 



DC -3 kit 12 hour lormal 
DC-3 wired and tested 



S22.&5 
$29.95 



Calendar Alarm Clock 

The clock that's got it all &- 5" LEDs 
17'24 hour, snooze 24 hour aJarm. 4 
year calendar battery backup and 
tots more The super 700 1 chip is 
used Sire 5x4x2, nches Complete 
kit. less case (not availablel 
DC-9 $34.95 



Under Dash Car Clock 

12- 24 hOur clock ir« 3 b*t9Vl\lw\ptH*lnzt$ZVt*4ti.>r'-x 
6 fiimbc RED LEDS hig»i accur&cy lOTI^l «jtsy 
3 wire hcKJfcu-p display blip's u,nh 19ml iof> if>d 

frUjSJM ■■<:■.••■■: llfiftl f.3|.!li.:.iii.il .H-nn., (truCMTHiiL^Hv 

sdjosts cinpMir rp »mbt*r*f ii^m \*&ti 

OC ii doCtf * rr r-i rrr hr^:-i>'i tl 7. frS I. M 
CM 1 .-i.mmer idaprs-r fi.Sfl 

*nd SiOOn Atsy ana Ts&i 



PARTS PARADE 



Video Terminal 

--. -mfHgiei* self. corirair^pO sia^c aJOnp vidfu- lemnna? c*rcl Requ-rffsoniy art ASCII hfjyti&atilanrr'V 
■iet to DPcc-me a cappl-?re1ermrna' un:1 F^-ari.rp-s s'p iirKiip^V a^ppJt 3TAl co'r*rfoHed sync a^Etb^ut) 
■ ■■■ ■-. h: Rf-nn f i.\-'i pl#i* C-Ortnpurn.'- ftnti fc«fybO*'fl <unlr.j. :il < .i">i:i Plainly Prryr ;:i?nirOi ^fiJ lliSplat 
Acctpls ar>c? generajes spfiai ftf^f n phis pa^alipl hievboa'd rrpiM T" 11 %* '* is&i tf-nr iiy;ifi kities ■ 
^r Til 1 1^ li »pper anrt >nwr c^hf lO0(n?ft#K #riEj has RS ?3? Ar^it ?&&* Uww inW*ii*l fifl f">*i r iT H 
include &ocker& and corr-plete documeniaincHi 

RE 64i6 tfrr^Hti* I wo hit 1 M4 S60 00 *<H* wwd unn 1 JUS 35 

Lc*p> Case auhon Il3s6 

Po#J>r SupptV 314 J5 

RF Windi.-lr»ro 17 95 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



301 

324 

3*0 

555 

556 

565 

566 

56? 

741 

145S 

3900 

3914 

&03S 



<* 



S-35 
*1« 
H.SO 

% 45 
(1.00 
tl 00 
SI, 00 
St 25 
10 S 2 00 
S SO 
S .SO 
S29S 
$2,95 



TTL 



74S0O 

7447 

7475 

7490 

74196 



S .40 

£ 65 

£.50 

$ .50 

St 35 



SPECIAL 



4011 
4013 
4o4£ 
4049 
*059 
4511 
4516 
5639 



CMOS 



fllffll 



.50 

.50 

B1.85 

.50 
$9.00 
$2,00 
$1.35 

SI. 75 



REAPOUTS 

FND3S9 < CC tt.00 

FND WStQ 5"C A 100 

MAN ?2/HP?T30 il'C * 1.00 

HP 7S5i «"C A 1.00 



11C90 

10116 
7208 

7207 A 

7216D 

7107C 

5314 

5375AB/G 

7001 



$15,00 
$ 1.25 
$17.50 
S 5,50 
$21.00 
$12.50 
S 2.95 
$ 2.95 
$ 6.50 



Resistor Ass I 
Assorrment of Pop u far values - % 
wan Cut lead" lor PC mounting '' 
csntRr /: ■ leads, bag of 300 or 
more 

St. 50 



Switches 

Mini toggle SPOT S1.Q0 

Red Pushbuttons N.O-. 3/S1.0Q 



Earphones 

3" leads d Ohrn good For srnarJ lone 
speakers alarm clack? etc 
5for$1,0Q 



Mini B ohm Speaker 
Apprcix 2 '■' di^"> Round 
Eypf! For raflifls mike file 
3 for S3. 00 



Crystals 

3579545 MHZ H-50 

10.00000 MHZ 15.00 

5. 243000 MHZ J 5.00 



AC Ada pie r* 

Good lor cJocks mead 
crictrgerrjjHll HfJ VAC plug 
□ ne end 

a 5 ^dc C& 20 mA SI .00 

16 vac Iffi 160rnA S3. 50 

l? tfac fq> 250 mA S3 .00 



Solid Stite Buzzeri 

smalf bujzer 450 Hz. 86 dB sound 
ourpul on 5-12 iicJC il 10-30 mA TTL 
compatible II 50 



Slug Tuned Coils 

Small 3-'l&" hex Slugs turned corl 
3lurns 10 for $1.00 



AC Outlet 

Panel Mount wdh Leads 

4/51 00 



Audio 
Pre scaler 

Make high resoiutron audio 
measurmenls. grea! for musical 
instrument tunirrg, PL tones etc. 
Multiplies audio UP in frequency, 
selectable *10 or xl00. gives .01 
HZ resolution with 1 sec gate 
rime 1 High sensitivity of 25 mv 1 
meg input 7 and built-in filtering 
gives great performance Runs 
on 9V battery, all CMOS 
PS-2 kit $29.95 

PS-2 wired $39.95 



600 MHz 
PRESCALER »™ 










Extend the range of your 

counter to 600 MHz Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity, specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired, tested. PS-IB $59,95 
Kit. PS-IB S44.9S 



FERRITE BEADS 

Wifn tnfo ar.0 tpecs 15.''ti.M 
( Hole Baii^n Beads S/|1.rj0 



TRANSISTORS 

a-Nr-aatH npn c»f is/*i.» 

2tJ39TO PNP C-F 15^11 M 

2N4403 PNP C^F ts/l 1 ,« 

?n a* mNPNe«F i a.'i i .«? 

?N«16FETC'F */t1.00 

?«J5.4Dl PN« : C-* S.-tl.OQ 

?W«02e C*F 4'tl.OO 

7NJ771 MPN SUHStfP HSd 

2NS179 UMFNPN 3/I2.W 

Pljw 6i T t L> NPN 4DW 1/| 1 DO 

Pl>*bt Tad PNP +0W 3/1.00 

MPF 10a.'BN5*84 t.50 

NPN 3904 TfPfl T"R SA/tl.SO 

P*IP 390« Typ# T+R SO/U.» 

2N30SS S.W 

2ish»4£ ujt i/ia.ao 



Sockets 

8 Pin 10/&2.00 

14 Pin 10/52.00 

16 Pin 10/S2.00 

24 Pin 4/S2.0G 

28 Pin 4/$2.00 

40 Pin 3/S2.00 



Diodes 

5 1 V Zener 20/S1.00 

1N9U Type 50/S1.OO 

1KV 2Amp B/$1.00 

100V 1Amp 1S/S1.00 



CAPACITORS 

TANTALUM 

Dipped EpQjty 

1.5uF25V3/$1.O0 
1.8 uF 25V 3/S1.00 
,22uF25V3/$1.00 



ALUMINUM 

Ehecirolylic 

1000 uF 16V fladjal 1.50 

M0 uF 2QV A^iai 1.50 

150 uF 16V Axial S-ll M 

10 UF 'SVPatfia' la.'IT Oft 



OlSK CfflAMlC 

01 1fiV 3is> ?p.J1 00 
1 1£>V 15'ilQD 

fXli 16V M/fl.00 

100 pf M/J1 .00 

047 1fJV ap'ti.» 



DC-DC Converter 

•5 vdc input prod -9 vdc @ 30r«na 
■ 9 vdc prod uc es - 1 5 vdc (S> 35 ma f 1 . 25 



2&K 20 Turn Trim Pot SLO0 
IK 20 Turn Trrrn Pft\ \ .Sd 



J. 



Ceramic IF FNlers 

Mini ceramic filters 7 rtH^ 

B.W 455 KHz S1 50 ea 



It 



Trimmer Cup! 

Sprague - 3-40 pf 

Stable Polypropyfene 

,50 f4, 



30 Walt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple CJass C power amp features 8 times power gain 1 W in 
for 8 out, 2 W In for 15 out, 4Win for 30 out Max output of 35 W, 
incredible value, complete with all parts, less case and T-R refay 
PA-1, 30 W pwr amp kit $22.95 

TR-1, RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.95 



MRF-238 iransistor as used in PA-1 
a-lOdh gam ISO mhz $11.95 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(1W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 

TRT Kit $6.95 



Power Supply Kil 

Complete mpte regulated power 
supply provider variable 6lo 18voilsat 
200 ma and i-5 at l Amp Excellent load 
regulation good filtering ana) small 
size Less transformers rEquiresOSV 
s1 A and 24 VCT 
Complele kit. PS-3LT 16.95 



Crystal Microphone 

Small I" diameter *&■' Ihick 
crys-ta I mike cartridge S.75 



25 AMP 

100V Bridge 

$1.50 each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



Coax Connector 

Chassis mount 
BNC type 11.00 



Mini RG-174 Coax 
10 It. for $100 



9 Von B*ll*fy Clips 

Mic& quality clips 5 tor f l.OO 

%" Rubbef Grornmeis 10 far 11.00 



OPAMP Special 

Bl^FET LF 13741 - Direct pin for pin 741 compatible, bu! 500.000 MEG 

input z. super low 50 pa inpiit curfent. Jow power drain. 

50 lor only $3 00 10 for 12- 00 



Pi'ii Bag 
Aiat of cuiokfrj true c^p& i&f» r*4i»ro*J 
ii.;-i5.,4if?rs dtfiiiei MfCA caps eic 
s- bag I lQQ pel 1 1.40 g Dag (300 pel 12.54 



Con nation 
6 pin type ^qiCl contacts- tijr 
ttiA-10D3 C&r Clock module 
price 75 va 



Ledi - your choice, pfease spectty 

Mini Fed, Jumbo Red. Hrgh Intensity Fled, Illuminator Red ft/$1 

Mini Yeltow. Jumbo Yellow, Jumbo Green 6/$1 



Varaetfrn 
MotarQln MV 350S 30 PF NOrnmal Cap ZQ-EH) PF - Tunable range 

5ft **ch or 3/tl.OO 



7&MG 

7&MG 

723 

3Q9K 

7B05 



$125 

$1.25 

$.50 

$1.15 

$1.00 



R«gul aitcra 



7812 

7fil5 
7905 
7912 
7915 



$1.00 
$1 00 
$1.25 
$125 
$1.25 



Shrink Tubing Nubt 

Nice pre<u[ pCes tjf sfiriflk %\Z& 1" x '* " 
shnnk to '■i" Greal for sprrc&s 50/tl.OO 



Mini TO-92 ^teal Sinks 
ThermaJlpi/ gr$nd 5 tor 11. M 

I •) ?20Heat SifthS 3 lor SI. M 



Opto isolators - 4N26 type 

Opto Reflectors - Photo diode t LED 



H 



$30 ea. 
$1.00 ea. 



Molax Pint 
M<ii-l?j< alre&dy procujt in length ol 7 Perfect 
tor 14 pin socket 2f> ttrlpt for $1.00 



CDS Phploc^ll 

Res^SlFjnre varies, wrtfi IhgFit ?50 ohms lo 
over 3 meg 3 lor (1.00 



^See U$t of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine * April, 19S2 169 



CALL TOLL FREE 



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-Power Switch 

- M S" Meter indicates str*ngth 
of received signals. 

-Digital Display indicates 
frequency of received signal. 

-Mode Switch selects operat- 
ing modes AM (wide) for 
broadband AM reception such 
as from AM broadcast band. 
AM (narrow) for AM voice 
reception, wrth maximum 
rejection of interfering signals 
USB for SSB (USB) reception 
LSB/CW for SSB ( LSB) or 
CW reception. 

-Band switch selects frequency 
band in MHz, from to 29 in 
1 MHi steps, 

-Main Tuning Knob Use to select 
frequency within each band. 



Hf ATT Switch allows 20 dB 

input signal attenuation. 
-Tone Control allows adjustment 

of audio frequency response 

to minimize effect Of 

interference. 
■NB Switch noise blanker. 

minimizes effect of ignition 

and other pulse- type 

interference, 
*AF Gain Control allows 

adjustment of speaker out- 
put volume. 
-Speaker 
-RECORD Jack permits use of 

tape recorder to record 

signals being received* 
-PHONES Jack allows use of 

headphones for private 

listening. 



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SWR & POWER METER 



The cross- needle meter indicates both forward power and 
reflected power on one meter and SWR is raed directly at 
the point where the needles intersect- Both power and 
SWR can be checked instantly without time-consuming 
sensitivity adjustments— even when using SSB. 



Our Most Popular Scanner 
the JIL SX 100 



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NAV $399.00 



16 Channels 30-54 MHz, 140-180 
MHz. 410-514 MHz Digital Clock 
Dale Display 1 10 V AC or 12- 
16 V DC 

Seek Rale Fasl lOch/sec 
Slow 5c h/ sec 
Bnghi Green 9 D*gii Frequency Dig 
play Exl Antenna Jack Ext 
Speaker Jack Large Ton Mount mg 
Bracket Scan Rare Fast Scft/sec 

Sk>w 4ch. sec 
Stan Delay Time Variable 0-4 sec 

UNBELIEVABLY PRICED 
AT A LOW $19995 



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MIRAGE B-108 Two Meter Amplifier 

Features 10W in- BOW Qui or 2 Walls 
In 50 Wans oulput tor Handie-Talkies 
Bullion Receive Preamp, Adjustable 
Delay for SSB Automatic Internal or 
External Relay SwHcning, Frequency 
Range 144 to 146 MHi Works lor SS8. 
CW or FM Modes Receive Preamp 
Provides lOdb Gam Mm 5 YEAR 
WARRANTY 




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OUR PRICE *1 59.95 



2 Meter Avanti Mobile Antenna 




Mounts on glass — no nodes' Receives and 
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enetftve using new 0uo-6ona methiorj wn»cn 
ccsm&nes quid* drive dway witfi ruggmt 
durability No holes to drill, no magnet to 
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coaxial cable 

SPECIAL $29.95 



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170 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



LINKS • REPEATERS • TRANSMITTERS 
RECEIVERS • PREAMPS • CONVERTERS 
TRANSCEIVERS • POWER SUPPLIES • PA'! 



t»«n S m,S QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 



AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 




FM-5 PC Board Kit - ON LY $1 59.95 
complete with controls, heatsink. etc. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 

1 watts, 5 Channels, for 6M. 2M, or 220 



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HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 
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• R76 VHF FM RECEIVER for 10M P 6M, 
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• R450 UH F FM RECEIVERfor3B0-520 MHz 
bands. Kits in select fvf ty options from $94.95 

• R1 10 VHF AM RECEIVER KlUorvhf aircraft 
band or ham bands- Only $84,95, 



COR KITS With audio mixer and speaker 
amplifier Only $29,95, 

CWID KITS 158 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio. Only $59.95. 

A1 6 RF TIGHT BOX Deep d rawn alum, case 
with tight cover and no seams, 7x8x2 inches. 
Only $18.00. 

SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 
1 35-1 44 P 240-270, 400*420, or 806-894 MHz 
bands on any scann er. Wi red/tested Only $799 5. 



T51 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M T 6M, 2M. 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous. Kits only $54.95. 

T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent. Kits only $64.95. 

VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 
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Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Kits from $69,95. 






VHF & UHF RECEIVER 
PREAMPS. Low noise. 



VHF & UHF TRANSMITTING CONVERTERS VHF & UHF RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



For SSB, CW, ATV, FM, etc Available for 6M T 2M. 
220,440 with many IF input ranges. Converter board 
kit only at S79.95 (VHF) or $99.95 (UHR or kits 
complete with PA and cabinet as shown. 



20 Models cover every practical rf and if range to 
listen to SSB, FM. ATV, eta on 6M 2M, 220, 440. and 
1 10 aircraft band. Even convert weather down to 2M! 
Kits from $39-95 and wired units. 



VHF Kits from 27 to 300 MHz. UHF 
Kits from 300 to 650 MH2. Broadband 
Kits: 20*650 MHz. Prices start at 
$14.95 (VHF) and Si 8.95 (UHF). All 
preamps and converters have noise 
figure 2dB or less. 






Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1.00 or 4 IRC's for overseas MAILING) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



amironics, inc. 

65-RMOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 *>& 



Mamtronics* is a resist ered trademark 



ramsa^j the first name in Counters ! 




L" T W -rrl I urn itfFHn 
' I fc a. >#Q Ji> <■» • 

'■int 

V | AC idutftr 
MP 1 N iluI pith. ■ M 
A4t|^Fr * "turpi* 
i IV I ^iliLrn pii»r> Uvcn 
umh t<1lf 

I ilril'J Umf HV rlljlul 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz 



The CT-90 it the moil versatile, feature packed counter available for lest 
than $300 00! Ad vanced design features include three selectable gate time v 
rune digit a, gate indicator snJ a unique display hold function which hoi dt the 
displayed count ulicr the input signal 1 5 removed! Also, alGmHiTCXOtime 
base is ta&ed which enables easy zero beat calibration checks against WWV 
Optionally; sin internal nicad battery pack, external time base input and Micro- 
power high lability crystal oven time base are available, The CT-90, 
performance you can count on! 



$129^ 

^ ^^ WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range 
Sensitivity 

Resolution 



Display: 
Time base 

Power 



20 Hi to 600 MHi 

Let* than 10 MV to 1 50 MHi 

Less than 50 MV to 500 MH* 

0.1 Hi (10 MHz range* 

1.0 Hi {AG MHz range! 

10J5 HmGOO MHi range) 

9 digits 0.4" LED 

Standard-] 000 mHi, 1.0 ppm 20 40 C. 

Optional M iero- power ovenO.l ppm 20-40 'C 

845 VACtft 250 ma 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 



WIRED 




SPECIFICATIONS; 



Range. 
Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 



hivplav 
Time base; 
Power 



20 Hi to 525 MHi 

lew than 50 MV to 1 50 MHt 

Less than 1 50 MV to 500 MHr 

10 H/i* MHi ran^J 

100 HnSO MHi range i 

100 Km 500 MHi range* 

7 digiti0 4" LED 

1.0 ppmTCXO 20-40 C 

12 VAC" 250 ma 



The CT-70 break s the price bamei on lab quality frequency counters. 
De lu se feature* such ax three frequency ranges each with pre- amphikauon, 
dual selectable gale timet, and gate activity indication make measurements i 
snap. The wide frequency range enables you to accurately measure signals 
from audio thru UHF wiih I pptn accuracy - that** 0001%? The CT 70 is 
the answer to all your measurement needs, in the field labor ham shack. 



PRICES: 

CT 70 wired 1 year warranty 

CT-70 Ka 90 day parti mu- 

tanty 

AC- 1 AC adapter 

BP-l Nicadpack * AC 

adapter charter 



$*995 




DIGITS 500 MHz 



$79ss 

WIRED 



PtttCESc 

MINI 100 wired. I year 

warranty 

AC Z Ac adapter tot M IN I 

100 

BP 2 Nicid pack and AC 

adapter charger 



$79 95 

J 95 

12 ^5 



Here's a handy, general purpose counter that provides most counter 
functions at an unbelievable price The MINI- 100 doesn't have the full 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higher price units, but 
for basic RF signal measurements it can't be beac Accurate measurements 
can be made from I MHi all the way up to 5 00 MH* with eicellem sensitivity 
thtuughoul the range and the two gate umes Let you select the resolution 
desired Add the mead pack option and the MINI 100 makes Mn ideal addition 
IP your toot boa for in the- field frequency checks and repairs. 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range 
Sens m vny 
Re solution 

Display 
Time base 



1 MHz to 500 MHi 
Less than 25 MV 
100 Hi \ slow gait« 
1.0 K Hi Hast gate! 
7 dtgjts.0 4 LED 

2 ppm 2Q-*ti*C 
5 VDC * 200 ma 



DIGITS 600 MHz $1591 






&$■ 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Range; 20 Hi to 600 MH? 

Scnsitixin Less than 2? mv to 150 MH2 

Less than ISO mv to 600 MH/ 
Resolution: J. Hi (60 MH/ range} 

10.0 Hi (600 MHi range) 
Display I digits 4 LED 

Time baser 2.0 ppm SO 40 C 
Power HO VAC or 12 VDC 



The C T- 5 is a v ersai i le I ab be nc h counte r thai w II I m easu re up to 600 M H z. 
with 8 digit precisioiL And one of its best features is ihe Receive Frequency 
Adapter, which turns the CT-50 into a digital readout for any receiver The 
adapter is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connection to ihe 
receiver* s VFQ is all that is required for use, Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way limits (he operation of the CT-50. the adapter can be conveniently 
Oft or off The CT-50. a counter that can work double duly* 




PRICES: 



CT-50 wired. I year warranty SI 39,95 
CT 50 Km 90 day parti 

warranty 1 1 9.95 

RA-1. receiver adapter kit 14,95 
RAr| wired and preprogram- 
med t send copy of receiver 

schematic! 29. 95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99 



in"!: 



95 
WIRED 



PRICES: 




DM 700 wired, I year warranty 


$99 95 


DM 700 Kit 90 day parts 




warranty 


79.9? 


AC 1, AC adaptor 


3,95 


BP-3. Nicadpack *-AC 




adapter, charger 


fW 


MP- 1, Probe kil 


2.95 



The DM -700 afters protection j I quditv performance at ■ hubhv iai pnee- 
Feamre* include: 2t> dirtrfrni i.mmi ind 5 functions, jII jrrjfijjed in i 
convenient, easy to use formal Measurements are dlspJiticd Oil a litRe 3 1 ': 
digit,. '-'. inch LED readout with autornatk decimal plan-meni* automatic 
I -. • i ir 1 rv . 1: iv crran^e indication iind overload prorecnon up to 12 50 voir win „li 
rimno, nmkinR it vkrtiinllv gonl-pr<:ioil The DM-7CS0 tuuks ureal. 1 hnml^orm*,, 
■ 1 black, ruigjrd AoS case wLih convenient retractable tilt hail make* it jn 
iJr.il i.Uinnn tO :itu shoj 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

IX AC vollt IOOuV to I KV, 5 ranges 

DC/ AC 

0. 1 uA to 2,0 Amp*. 5 ranges 

0.1 ohms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 



Current 

Resistance. 

Input 

impedance 

Accuracy: 

Power 



10 Megohms, DC/ AC volts 
3% basic DC vol is 
4 C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high resolution audio measurements multiplies 
LP m frequency 

* Great for PL tones 

■ Multiplies by E0 o* 100 

• 0.0 1 Hi resolutioff 

S29.M K11 S39-W Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna BNC plue 

High impedance probe, light loading 
Low pass probe, for audio measurements 
Direct probe, general purpose usage 
Tift bail for CT 70, 90. MINI- SOO 
Color burst calibration unit* calibrates counter 
agamsl color TV signal 



S 795 

1595 
15,95 
12-95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuring; extremely weak iiassals rrorn 10 10 I AV 
M H : S rftaJ I *ce. powered hv pJuf framtormef -mduded. 

• Flat 25 db gain 

• BNC Connectors 

• Great for sniffing RF with pick up loop 

S*4 95 Kit S44 95 Wired 



VISA 



ramsey electronic's, inc. 1 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield, NY 14526 " M 



PHONE ORDE K^ 
CALL 716-5^395(1 



jl RMS Sotnloom" gworttvtd Hfl»in* I'o* ^0 dors *' "fl 1 pt»o«il 
tmtutn in vicinal Iwm to* i«fyn4 Add 5*» to* (hipfHng 
4niU'an{« fo D mopimym of $1 Ov*n*at aA4 I i*M COO odd 

12 Ofdari ixtid*r i 1 add 1 1 SO Nt ^atidanis odd 7"\ las 



172 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



i 



TOP QUALITY PARTS FOR LESS 



M.O.H.O. 



(Sensational New Hold Device For Your Phone) 

A Digital Research Exclusive, This handy item allows 
your home phone the HOLD option, formerly available only 
to the businessman. Enjoy the convenience of placing calling party 
on hold without monthly charges! 



• Activates using the " *" button on your phone. 
• Pleasant "Tone" to remind caller he is on hold, 
• Unique 4 minute cutoff if calling party is forgotten. 
• Can be used to provide music for the calling party. 
• FCC Approved. 



*::: 



k .* » H 



$37.50 

Assembled & Tested 



MOHO is accessible from any phone in your home 



Kit $29.95 



Complete 



(For rotary dial add 51 50 per phone) 



POWER SUPPLY 
TRIPLE OUTPUT 

25 Volts @ 18A 

5 Volts @ .8A 

15 Volts @ 1.25A 

Isolated independent 
outputs 

Positive or negative 
operation 

Constant Voltage Regu- 
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25 Volt tine adjustable 
with 10 turn pot from 
23.5 V to 28 Volts, 120 
Volt - 60 Hz input Fused - 
H=3 / W=5V D^4" 

95 



SOCKETS 

Low Profile Solder Tail 

8 pin 15 100 20 pm 7 1.00 

14 pin 10 1 00 24 pin 6 l 00 

15 pin 6 1,00 28 pin 6 1.00 

16 pin 8/1.00 40 pin 5 1 00 

Buy $10 Get $1.00 
FREE CHOICE 



Precision Hybrid 
Oscillator Module 

Has both 1 MHZ and 2 MHZ 
TTL - outputs —Hermeti- 
cally sealed — Ultra high 
stability over wide temp 
range —originally cost over 
S40.00 each — we made a 
super purchase from a 
major computer manufac- 
turer — 5 Volt operation - 
fits standard 24 pin socket - 
Manufactured by Motorola 
oscillator division. 

MC6871A 



MC0B71A 

en* it At e*c 

1 QWm 



3/20 



w/data 



NEO 2137 by NEC 

• Microwave R F trans- 
istor (N.PN.) 

• Micromold Package 
#37 

• Dual Emitter leads 

• FT to 4.5 GHZ 

• VCEO 10V-CC 20 
MA. HFE 40-200 

• Gain 10V-20MA- 
1GHZ = 14DB Typical 

• Very low noise - High 
gain 1 5 DB @500 
MHZ 

• Cleared for high reli- 
ability space appli- 
cations 

COMPARE I 50 



2N6058 

12 AMP Darlington NPN 

VCEO - 80 VDC 

IC - 12 ADC 

HFE-3500 (TypJ (o)5,0ADC 

TO-3 Case 

1.35 ea. 3/3-50 



Variable 
Inductors 

30-40 uh 
9uh 1.2 uh 
Huh to 20 uh ■•' 
.25urV.35uh 
85 uh- .95 uh 



EIAJ#1SS98 

NEC#4981-7E 

Microwave - Schottky 

barrier diode 



HP-Ho1 Carrier diodes 
5082-2835 



• It 



c or 6/5 00 



UNIVERSAL 
TIMER KIT 

* Adjustable from 1 sec 
to 1 hr. 

* Control up to 1 amp 
"Turn Things On Or Oft' 
Kit includes alt parts 
necessary to build this 
exciting kit Uses Children's 
T v programs - Darkroom 
exposures - Amateur 10 mm 

I D er - Egg Timer - Inter- 
mittent Windshield Wiper 
Absolutely endless uses. 
Complete kit including 
power supply, p c board 
DPDT relay, and all parts to 
make timer operational 

Sg95 



ORDER YOUR 



TERMS: Add $1 postage, we pay balance. Orders under 
$15 add 75t handling. No C,Q,D. We accept Visa, 
MasterCard and American Express cards, Tex. Res. add 
S% Tax. Foreign orders (Canada 10%) add 20% P k H. 



VISA* MASTERCARD • AMERtCAN EXPRESS * 



7982 CATALOG TODAY! 

Digital Research: Parts 

P.O. Box 401247 • Garland, Ttxai 75040 



(214) 271-2461 



?3Magazine • April, 1982 173 



52 SPECIALISTS ■ CUSHCRAFT - DftAKC • HRM K€V * HUSTUfl • HV-GftIN • ICOM • KflNTRONICS ■ 



O 

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SONY 
ICF2001 



DIGITAL 
DIRECT ACCESS 
SHORT WAVE RECEIVER 



150KHZ 30 MHz +■ FM BROADCAST 

PLL SYNTHESIZED WITH SCANNING & MEMORY 

AC ADAPTOR INCLUDED 

1 YEAR SONY USA FACTORY LIMITED 

WARRANTY 

AM/CW/SSB 

SURPRISINGLY AFFORDABLE 

CALL AND ORDER YOURS TODAY 






OUR BEST-SELLING MULTI-BAND! 



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(Conn U .S.A.J 




• One hall (he length of con veronal halt- wave di poles 

• Mulli-band. Mulll-'requency 

• Maximum ^Miejenty — rio traps, loading cons or studs 

■ Fully assembled and pre-turied — no measuring no cutting 

■ Alt wealhe* raied — \ KW AM, ? 5 KW CW or PEP SS9 

• Proven performance — more man 10.000 nave been delivered 

• Permit use of the full capafrlihcs ol today s 5 band «cvts 

• One reetilme for operation on an oanos 

80-40HD/A 80/40 Mtr bands (69). . . . 99-00 
75/40HDfA 75/40 Mtr bands (66). . . . 94,50 
75-10HDJA 75/40/20/15/10 Mtr (66), .126,95 
80-10HD/A 80/40/20/15/10 Mtr (69), . 132.00 



X-ft 
& 

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>:.- 




< p 



ftp 

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59 



95 



plui S3. 00 

shipping 
(Conn U.S.) 



4ii irtB *orids snoftwaw* broadcas) bands *r* 
vou'a i#-(h the Eavesdropp&r All-Band antenna 
individual! t tuned traps m#fcn the Eavesdropper 
*oa i At seven separate *niennas each tuned lo 
a diilff^eni miemaifonail broaocasi band Also 
town 11 and 60M bandi « w*n Ms 100 toot 72 



Eavesdropper 

SHORT WAVE BROADCAST 
RECEIVING ANTENNA 

• AUTOMATIC BANDSWTTCHING* 

• COMPLETELY (WEATHERPROOF! 

• COMPLETE, NO ASSEMBLY NEEDfO! 

■ GQ r 49. 41, 3t, 25, 19. 16, 13 & 11M BANDS? 



ohm balanced leedltne provides an e*ad rnaith lo 
the anlenna on ovary band Gomirs cornpieiely 
assembled, and raady to install with 50 M. of 450 
lb tesl nvion foot Overall length- 4? 10* Wim 
• 1 1 copper clad sraal Bands *iir_run.g Automate 
impedance to tcvr 50 75 ohms balanced 

On*y***»$ 



-5S 

SB 

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1-i 









AMECO ALL-BAND PREAMP! 

Our Most Popular Preamplifier 

MODEL PLF-2 



s 



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52 

plus S3.00 shipping 




: ^Z35$& 



MODEL PLF-2„ J m proves weak signals as much 
as image and spurious rejection of most receivers. 
Direct switching to rec. or preamp. Includes pwr. 

supp. 1 17 VAC wired & tested $52,95 

MODEL PLF-2E...240 VAC 50-60 Hz operation 

£57 Q5 

MODEL PT*2...For transceiver use. Continuously 
tunable from 6 to 160 meters. Features dual -gate 
FET transistor amplifier for improved receiver sen- 
sitivity and low noise figure. Requires no 
transceiver modifications and can handle up to 
250W transceiver output, 1 1 7 VAC 60 H2. . . 179.95 
MODEL PT-2E.„240 VAC 50-dO Hz opera UonSU.95 



TRANSCOM 

PROGRAMMABLE SUB AUDIBLE TONE 
ENCODER FOR ICOM HANDHELDS. 





$ 



29 



95 



ICOM WE'VE SOLD FM GEAR FOR 14 YEARS 

& IN OUR OPINION ICOM IS... 
"SIMPLY THE BEST" 

I 



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Pigs $2.00 

shtpping and 

handling 

• ONLY 1.1" X55"X.2" 

• PRESET OUTPUT LEVEL FOR IC2A 

• LOW TONE DISTORTION LESS THAN 1% 
THD 

• TONE STABILITY ± .2% Hz FROM -20C 
TO +70C 

• 1 YEAR LIMITED FACTORY WARRANTY 

• 5VDC POWERED 



■M 



9- 
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IC2A, IC2AT 

OUR MOST 

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HELD &THE BEST 
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IC3AT (220 MHz) 
IC4AT (440 MHz) 



COMPACT 

QUALITY CONSTRUCTION 
VERSATILE 
AFFORDABLE 
WIDE RANGE OF ACCES- 
SORIES AVAILABLE 



'Si 




IC25A 



A LITTLE PACKAGE WITH A 
LOT OF BIG FEATURES... 



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ENCODING MIC -SCANNING 



CALL FOR PRICE & AVAILABILITY 



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T^v Annpn CALL 0R WR,T ^ MASTER CARD, VtSA. MONEY ORDERS, PERSONAL CHECKS TAKE 3 WEEKS 
I O URDtK: TO CLEAR, ACCEPTED. INTERNATIONAL ORDERS WELCOME, PLEASE REQUEST PRO FORMA 

INVOICE. 

HOURS: MON. THRU WED. 9:30-6:00, THURS-FRL 9:30-8:00, SAT 9:30-3:00 

STOP BY AND VISIT WHEN IN THE CHiCAGOLAND AREA!! 



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H 

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174 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



o 

i 




utjc 
MINI STEREO 
FM RECEIVER 

WITH HEADPHONES 

trot Joggers, Cyclists, 
and Skaterst 



FEATURES: Lightweight headphones. Left; right 
balance control; Full Fidelity stereo sound. Addi- 
tional black soft carrying case & shoulder strap, Belt 
clip (hands free). Operates on 3 A A cell batteries (not 
Incl.). Compact size: 3V * 4%'' x 1". Wt. 6 oz. 

Model 1810 List Price $89.95 $29.95 



MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 




SPEAKERS 



1 3-6 

p art #A0201 1.25 .99 

Round — 8 Ohm 
.25 Watt (4 M Leads) 
Size: 2%" * %*' 



2%' 




1 2-fi 

Parr* SF 25016 1.39 1.25 
2V*' 1 Square — 16 Ohm 

25 Watt (4 mount, holes) 

Large Ceramic Magnet 

Stee; 2%" x 2%" * %" 




& National Semiconductor 

RAM SALE 



INSSQBOA 

DPS214 

'- V H. 

[}Pt5* 

■rs.r-S 
■ .'•:.!■: 

INS4W 

UNSazM 
d,pbb] 
OPMH 
D P42» 

opi»j 

QPfi2T5 
DPtMTJ 
r;PEia: 
DfiUM 

! ■.'Y.li'r. 

Dizain 
rvstm 



STATIC HAMS 

MM2114N-24K{20ONSl . $2.49 each 

<H £AtH $iG.9&tDt| (100 EACH 3195.95/10(5 

MM2114N-2L 4 K [200 NS) Low Power , . , $2.95 each 

in €ACH El9.*.not| (lQQ EACH 322&.00i I m 

MM2147N 4K (70NSJ , ,$4.96 each 

-;k EACH 53*.9£,'EaU rlDQ EACH 1^19,65/1015 

MM611flP'4 16K{200NS> 

(SEACH t9B.9&flot| (1 DO EACH 5 1 1 9SJWnol] 

DYNAMIC RAMS 
MM41S4N-20 64K(20QNS) 

ifi EACH W9.9&IOtj (1O0 EACH t1195.QCluo&) 

MM5290N-2 16K(15QNS} 4116 

ft EACH *i9.9&IOl) (1TO EACH «!5.«Woti. 

MM52flON-4 16K{250NS)4116 

ft EACH $14.85/1 d11 Hffl each Jf75.0W|-ot] 



514.95 each 



.Si 4.95 each 

. .$2,95 each 
. .$1.95 each 



EPROM Erasing Lamp 




is.: 



• E raws 2708, 2716, 1702 A, 5203Q, 5204Q, ate. 

• Erases up to 4 chips within 20 minutes. 

* Maintains constant exposure distance of one inch, 

* Special Donductivotoam liner fliiminates stat k build-up. 

* Built-in safaty Lock to prevent UV exposure, 

• Compact - only 7-5/9" * 2-7/9" x 2" 

» Complete with holding trev tor 4 chips. 
UVS-11EL Rep I ace in ant Bulb S16.95 



U VS-11 E 



$79.95 



JOYSTICKS 



J5-5K 





VC-40 



JS-5K 5K Linear Taper Pots *-:* * 5-5.25 

JS-1Q0K 100K Linear Taper Pots , £4.95 

JVC-40 40K \2\ Video Controller in case . . . $4.95 




MUFFIN® FAN 

Ih£ dependable. lo* ciwt, Urg«l telling 
■in lor commercial woIIpej application?. 

+ lOScfm free air delivery 

• J.fiS" hcj. k 1.50" depth. Weight- 17 to. 
■ acoustical rall-ig as tow aa NC-3B 

* -iTora than IP yra. cent. (July at i0"C 

* Impedance prcracted 

• far amblenta lo 70 *C 

♦ UL yelioweard re-cognized A 
ClSA approved 1 

1W, SQfflOHir, H Walts, 1Q5crm - 
UMra&tHiicaity cleaned £ tested. 

MU2A1 . . . .$9\95ea. 



k.k 




JE215 Adjustable 
Dual Power Supply 

Genera) Description: The JE215 is a Dual Power 
Supply with irdependentadjustableposrtiiVBind nega- 
tive output vol la yes.. A separate adjustment fur each 
of the supplies provides the user unlimited applications 
for IC current woltaga requirements. The supply can 
also be used as a general all-purpose variable power 

SWPfly- FEATURES: 

• Adjustable reguiaied power jupplles, 

pas, and tnag. 1.2VDC tP 15VDC, 
- * Pov^er Ontpyt (e«h supply): 

5VDC^ 500mA, 10V DC # 750mA, 
I2VDC@ 500mA, ano 
15VDCE> 175mA. 
■ Two, 3-tarm|nol adj. IC regulators 
with: in arm a I overload protection. 

• Heat sink regulator cooling 

• LED "on" indicator 

• Printed Board Construction 

• 120VAC Jnpui 

• Sit*. 3-1/r'w * &.1/l*S"L * r j H 

JE2ta Adj. Dual Power Supply Kit (95 shown J . . $24.95 




1 Pic iu re not shown but similar in construction to a own} 
JE200Rag. Power SuppJy Kit <5VOC r 1 amp} - - $14-95 
JE 205 Adapter Brd. (to JE200) iS^9 & ±12V. $12.95 
J£ 2 1 V&. P wt . Sply. K it. 5 1 5V DC r to 1 . 5amp , S> 1 9.95 



BORQA/flOBOA SUPPORT DEVICES - 

fltS.I H-.|.iLl|^Ou|P,l| 

Prlo'lLv InltfTupl Control 
Bl-pirccltnn^l Bits OrkAr 
C|rjc»i Lj*nrr*[iiir/Df \v*r 
Dili nrlvijr 
System Ct>n(ro Hnr/Bui Urlv^r 

I/O EKpjitde-r 1cir 43- Series 
rtivncnrun'i-ou* toflim. EknrtM 
Ptd*. Comm. I/O 4USAHT] 
Pfflfl. Il*rtr>*< Tirajj 
Ptd». PerlorUTa! I/O (J>PlJ 
Prog. DMA C-(?n<rol 

Pico*. rAUrrupl eeiMntf 

Proa. Cfi"T ControHer 
Prnq- KcyDOjr<]/pi-fp]9y lnt*rf]ct 
Ey<:cm Tintlngi Element 
l-0« BI-priM<l*n#l RtqtiYff 
A-filt BI-Dlr*t1lon4l R«ctlvir 
J flit HI Oirtdiunjl RecElvsf 
Octal L. a- cned Per iphcil ."I. iy(ir 
Ctii 1 Latched *»riciM!'fli Orivar 

6BOO/6R00 SUPPORT DEVICES — 

MPU wlln Cloc* *nq: HAM 
]2£kH Static RAM 
F>ripn C T3h inter. Aflaot |IWtHM|t 
Pviorl^y !r,i;#:rTuot Contrnlhir 
icam-a t ROM Huig«a»-8) 

AlvrKhTDTIPU'L Comrp. Aa#pl«l' 

Syn^hrcinoM^ S*rl#l O^td Adiftler 

Matefri CHflJUl MODEM 

34X4 pi \1 s^Ju into r 

Qu4d j--5titt Bui. Tra nx. 1 r^ClT!fi> 

-MICROPROCESSOR CHIPS 

ZVHWK\ CPU fMK3HBr*i ftMHlk 

^0* j f»>3 > CPU I MK4H0P+-J] (JMHi h 

CPP^O? CPU 

THfl MPU 

a D MZ=H] ADC CPU- *- BH il Ice <C am. T* rtifr, r*m*> 

UCMiafi MPU ^^CSech (OK f>yl*i MBmn(¥|i 

NSM3SN* MPU-4-fi(l [*MHIJ 

iMSMSM-* CPU— 59l-Chl*S-Btt HZEU-iftasH AMI 

iMSiUdM-i CPU rSf e>'!«i HAM) 

• NSMTCN CP'.^— H Bytes RAM 

IN-56JTIN. CPU wyfiai*C Were lritan»ra(*r 

PMR CPU 

Tf.-'EIBOOJL MPU— ll-Blt 



4,56 
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-DATA ACQUISITION ^CONTINUED) 

ADDMOKCN JJ-BH A/DConv«rt«r fl-Ch. Wuill.k i-B 

ADDOnll'CCN sail A/DConvoftflr [lb-en. Mufll.) L6.» 

P ACJDWLCN 30-BH 0/ A CO n*- MffN, C0rv,fr. 40JG%|l Jl» 

ftCJDDB LC N 34-01 1 Of A Coav. M l*r u, C omo jC.2D^-|- H.9i 

OAC1IB0UCN JB-BUCWA Coiw«tw<g.DW Lin.) I-« 

GACI022CCN la-BHU/A LrjiiuerL?i (O.^T* Lin.j 5.* 

OACIKHtCN ]JEiltD,."A CQii verter (D.31T, I ir..j 9.W 

CU«5]N a-th4ii«i*l MulLtp»>«i l.tl 

AVS.jaU XK -BAUD U ART fi.« 

RAM '5 

IUJI 254*1 Sink 1.** 

MOO ia?4nJ Oynimlc .fl 

JJOL TBIDl) S«344-»<ti|<: *.» 

?ll» JoMxl fttitte [.73 

tlUH ICMni suite lis 

sqiHUtll} S»irtSi4HJ(. toM 

2JL£ 256K* EJtjrHll MOS 4.« 

31 U 1004x4 :-. ; *i I :. 4E£ :■ s .■• 7S 

23t4L loei*4 SMI l£ J.I4M. Ijow Ptiwor 2M 

L J Jli=^ ]0?4k4 Static LHJns. Z.4H 

JlLtL-2 Jfl?4>:4 5.1»tlC JMr.t l*w P(jw(ir .Vil 

T4KJW 2*k1 5-tati c fi k W 

4Jts^4(uPD«]fij WK Dynamic zaons (mms9HM-4|i L.'B 

4Imn-J S4K D/namic JDOrti ]am 

MM2W7N 40%* I FMt Tftrt 4,95 

5«0] ft* .4 -ji ., ; . i i i9 j 

MM5HI jOHirL D/hamk r u |iy De-coced ^ 

MMMS? fKul Dym-nlc 4} 

MMiSD^3»] 409Gxt Cynimk <.,ab 

MMS^QN^(4]1E] ]fiK Oynamic L»ni ruPD*5BC"H i!s% 

MMS3S4J-JA BK Oyn. Mfcnt (!a«flr4 dTMMSOTQJ] p,-ft 

H^lDU^-« tfiK r.2K*HJ Static 200ns. L4,S 

0SS19 SI fin ft aw U(*flOti Lis 

uPD4M/MK-*aa.r IK Dynamic JA-Pln 4.ft 

TM&ttlMlrtL. 4^ Stitlc ^.« 

TMS4W5 KB4K4; StttiC 9.45 

P ROMS/EP R OMS 



SHIFT REGISTERS 

MMSCQH pui(»-Blt Pyrujmkc .H 

MMS«I-I U-b. U-EPll DyMintc 50 

MM9QGH D^ll SDOBlt Sta-tlC .SO 

MMitDH DulSfiVBIt AtturT.p.ljl--,. JO 

MMLoHN 2M-QI1 Dynmfcc 2.9E 

MMSd!3M JCJ4-Bit D-jni!7ilc^£C'jmuHto' 1.95 

MMW16H HWrtlJ-aU Dyr*Ti,t 1,95 

MM4DUM Dct*l Ifl-Btt H.BS. 

HUMHN OctJ: )I!-E3!t 9,95 

HOtV^HHA] 30M-B1C Dynamic J.5S 

Z5LBN M1K3Z-BII EtallL 2,95 

24»V DUI I IH-BIt Stlths i.H 

zsa*v Sdz-eU Oynamlc .■» 

2535V .WEI! •Jya-riic 2.95 

K37V Dual SfeBM 5tiilc 2.B5 

sav dun -aw- sit si UK *■» 

2S»V DU4I 240-Bll SllllC - I-' 

Z532N Duad 4fl- Bit Stalls tH 

rjAWC. FifP [Dual OS!- i.95- 

DATA ACQUISITION 

A-^lK-lCN Unhtftrflt Acilvi Fllt*ir f.511 S.95 

AFJ2MCJ TQ^fh Tnnft t,r.'« D+rtd FlUiir ia.% 

AFJJZ'LCJ Tnuch Ton* High Band Fjltir 19.95 

:_rvi3dGCH 5>JP*» 0»1r Ol> Amp ].li 

U.M1MZ Conitml Cur*-n<it Ssurce l.jn 

LMBSZ T»ini4»»T*ttjfB Yrinilduoir J.,4fl 

LFaljl , * jflt i*p«t op Ame Lm 

LF1HN Simple t Hctld Amp-IITI«ri 154 

LMJ»H TW1P. Comp. Pr*;. R«1 . 4 .Sppm/C] SflU 

ADC-DhHLCn l-BII AfO CWIVtrMr (1 LSBJ 4.45 

□ACOHKLGN i-B-ll tvA CanwflrtHi- (O.Jim tln r ] £,2S 



IWA 2K UV Lraubla PflOIV. 5.9S 

?7<i ek eprom 29S 

TMSSM IS* EPROM <«5V, 4|.v. *1TJ\ *-« 

ET)bln.tBl[ZlinTI M*^ EPHDM (S.HIUH *JV] 4.M 

27SriHl«!ll SZKEPAOM It,?* 

2JSt tK. HPROM 1454)niL (Slngli -5V] 7 .19 

27E4D B4K £PRDM(llllBt^i HN4K. h .-i: *iJ¥5 

5KJ 3W. PBOW ]4,95 

K$7J{7t5H«] ?^li^PRqM rOp«n qolLBcfcor} XA# 

Kiilti ICffi fi:POl+r OfflOt-' ]4 r 95 

B25j;jC'4^;Ea;. 12t( Trl-StatB gipclir (»ADM 195 

nSIC SH PROM MM 
— Ov*f » Mart PAOMS t. : 1tBff In Oiff Ca-Ulf a — 

^ROM r S 



KHIfWdJ C^irKlfrOtntrtilCr 1Upp4r Ciiel 

S5jJ-;e?I'i C Jii'actfir SBh»r*tor tLpwar Cj.5*] 

NiVTOS REAO ONLV MEMORIES^- 

MC MMTlfln L»^9K 7 ASC 1 1 S*i I r:ed w/G mm k 

MCMitUOP ian9x7 Mi-in Symppi 4. Plciuns 

MCMfiBTSQP iastjK7 AlpM, C*n,|r(?| CM*^, Otn. 

MICROPROCESSOR MANUALS — 



?3i 

9.55 



1. >. 



M-ZH UH>r Msnual 1SH 

-'i-ca-jac-2 Uui Minuil 7,59 

M 3H8. Uwt '/IjiiMH '..•?: 

SPECIAL FUNCTION 

D5IKB5CM Dual MOS Cu:k Orl¥BT (5UZ1 3,50 

DSonJICN Dual MDB Ctnck SMvBjr BMZ] ].M 

iNij^TfciY-i. Flippy L5IK C«nirt>iiif 2l.« 

iNSWStru Coi^nnialialtfin cnl£ ;■ s 

WMMifiTN Mic metro cejiDr Rail TinMi ClQ-Sk Jv?i 

MMSfilKN 1 MKcrpprocmpr CompillDJ* Cl&tft ILK 

CDP*terj Mfccrucc,ritrE,|ltr*Uiii*-Dl9-lt A AM (.« 

if^fl Oir*cl LCO Drlva 

COPWiVIN VlicrDCDn1rall»r wtM 64-DlgU HAV TjH 

ft Dlrtict LEO Of-Ivb w/N Bubs. Int. 

CQP47QPt K-Sari.VACFIujjr, prlw»r (2fl.fl|n Pka.l J.2S 



TELEPHONE/KE VBOARD CHIPS 

A-f-i-9]00 pyin Butlnn T iBpP>niw DLKar |4,95 

A , -'-t-9?D0 H4p«rt4rv Dl4l*r UM 

AY-SfSQQ CMOS C'atk Gqn D -ratpr 4.JS 

AV-S-zlN KeyfrQird Enxddiir <J| k*yn Ll.M 

HDOIBS'5 Kwvonr} EMMi*T i|!* t.«yH LW 

74CW5 fctyB-Gird CncafllBT (kfi Jrfyf] J.« 

JiCWs Hayocafd £iiuM«f (29 Htyi] *.1S 

MMS299QN PuiA Button Pulbs CiPalBf 7.iS 

■4MSV499N */]i4-Toy Serial XeytJPlfd E(isow»f 495 




. :i:..;; 



P05 Conliniirjllon 



EECO BocKer DIP Switch — "Mini-DlprhT 2400 Series 

THE WOST UNIQUE DIP SWITCH AVAILABLE! 

MlNl'DIP Is uE£ig.<iEu to rslre-ir.! iiior tinnot of'Xp smilches IMiuiib tb'#hn^ inclndn locking 
rtc doslnn lo pro^enl Kcide'i'al aduBlioii ^nd gold seti-wiping contact. Urs-piece- hoqainn and 
pn«.-5-li[ lErminiits prevent coRJaminHiDr,. 3-1D slallon Form 'A" a<nd t-5 EtaJIprc Form "C ' 
• TfBrmlnatt dr .iMi .3(h) (S.S+ n 7.4^^ canters. * Kft or dip BacKflt mcjinati't' * Positive 
cleaiwniJ/'Viliilnfl BcMnn wflh gotd coiUkI * Tolal aoal and Peltom s*il 

Se*kei r- i Pari Ho. fas. ZGntiguralwn S&tka: Frloa 



24M-2 
2<M-3 
S4H-4 

24UQ-SC 



12 

1?D 
1234 
ABCD 
£5U2i 



S |ii :i 

s pin 

.! |i;- 

S pin 

14 :■■ 



78 ■ 19/ fl95 


?4«).i 


e 


HI - 10/ T.9B 


?4na 7 


7 


.9* < 1IJ'' 9 95 


24-naa 





39 ■ 10/ a 95 


S4Q0-9 


9 


l.fli - 107 9.95 


34Q0-10 


10 



123456 
t?MW7 

1?345g7fl» 

012345671? y 



14 pin 
14. pin 

15 pm 
1B pin 
20 pit 



1.0B 
1,19 
1.29 
1,19 
1.-49 



10/ 9 95 

10/10 95 
10/11.95 
HK1Z.95 
10/11.95 



GRAB BAG 
SPECIALS 




GfllBU i Pictured Above) 



Cflsnn 
c*io: 
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CAPACITORS - 

Sncrphofi 

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■HI-MT- Mi-lw 



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40 toe* TtnQWurA HuL'jI.i 4 J«v(dl 

4tl BB^ dhnd V4C11 IlLJnMLHJJcl- ti-ltll KJQVI 

I NTtfiH ftTED CIRCUITS 

r4iB WwTTLSkt!. +^i« .. 1JX 

17400, 74fDX, T4l2J r 4Uj 
UBT09 3ij««* _inui - -wrxn 4J(0 

l.r.UDl. 307. J41 33P, iicl 

■:^!!^20, I1I0.41JIJ.jt; I 

uBIK 1 WtK* Sun 6(*1IM - »<(ii r | i.OQ 

rasio.ssia, isii 3na,m i 

UfllSJ UKhtTLSim-TitU .. BjOB 

Hill |4J V Ptl Paiiii.i VrJ-*^ 1 fV^jlii.iii !TT>a $mm,- * 7Xi 

ITVfTt. 06. 1 1. I 6. T*. 21. wc I Lniv -irtrn 

GB14B *ii4k r+iril"- 1 ? V4-lij+P*i*i«*nfr(>a*«*tl , 4 00 

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SBin ifl pa. Mm *™,ll« Van .rtit ■ - D 4 ™ ■ ... 1-00 

irimao. i. ir. ii. m. i«.»i". I u*tn niiMe 

UEDS- LAMPS- READOUTS— 

' in pfdi Atrariiri l,iPi fadon A imI 
lltCGW. K Wlfl. *K.I 
40 4M*. rii 7 M»n t f b*- utripi 

■X ii MlJ-ilJi FhnOnuli crh -j -inn ilfcki, 
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■■JS'S" 34 aocA 3.B 1 ' euhf iwDlilum RC Vi>jiiI j (.O 

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■"JHIJ^ ^4 HHdi JIB" i^tiiip i*npta.|iiin Pd .Waunc I L<: 

V.iiikiwJ - 'K in H«r m»-h»> 

OBIM 24. *«h JIB" PiuItC' k'HHl'luin PC Mow Iflfl 

■iihlirli-J - l 00i lx/ 5 U»ii 'ArHd 

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GB-I-*' 330 n*h V^Hhjij «f« ^otcrn '.i,^ir. iin iF^cnl JjOT 

^&'+; B» Cl»trt *!1v'" , -i>( i«-1 livbTf K4 HBI|l|7 2.00 

Ga.l4d 3904Mh BWotC luft knalia EjQO 

iJBl'S lW*KiiLj(iu! r.-.ny B |. liupT-iwiKlnll 2.00 

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■'•nipn infl,T< :.* m ifl(K*rt.f.».viiMi thru 134"' J TO 

iini^l liyirfrL n^f r v.Tlw»* *Tj> §aaia_ahmir,, ^4i«^f. n-^?" 'VBH 

rtBCELLANfiOUS 

&B123 i0**tSitfi"-ii"hi iBihW^oS .. IJ.W 

■.Di:+ £ iKhauHHilCBCUullm.rppi t*thtm:tk .. i.05 

UfllTt; VI j%M-^ ('Saiu IbjUiiuii ■ IL1 i*i li lumiT^adl 1.D0 

r-ni77 100 H^n TnwHrtion - ivUhjgic Kid pa«a« ! 1^' 

■&B13B 00 ■#»(* Tjjf^fl ftVH- - hD*. (nH H4B +DO 

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'•■Bi3l! 1 lich l**f th^v* - bV Atom.* pr-1h tld ■-•■*■.- SB 

rw >f<nJ mil t cuiiHi Inin hci «*HJW|* - 

uCUl ]Du-:- U" rrnh tubing, m^.UM ndmhn 4. W 

-39S3J SJJ ■■afi Oinkffl, mm ind IraAKRHi . . .' -< 

ln.-.Li>l'™.. ^l^.|unAl 

<JBiaS i«r*-Sp*ik*n. i!:-L". Sit-m. :.i+H,i!r |M 

ffajIB^ JDP Bflch >ii]Hd rMiiEon. c#paoivrc J LU 

>!*«*. Hr-lJaMI.. Cl**"W 

'jffitrj Pi.iiuH Cniuil Bvi'O ^ "■" 

QHilam. 5& Vb cun-uv-pili M McN EnwU 

GBI^I .Wi* KMtpii l*»r hSanrtim-iainiil . .. 4jO> 

•iBI73 HOi'pyh '" fhi.i.L -lilr.'i, uii rjli-iiodrni LLlif 



BOOKS 

National Samlconductor Intenil - Intel 

30001 NiltQIiial CMOS Dttla cTDQk *5.S6 

15*3 wjyfis) 74C, CD40DU, and A.'D Ctnvcn*ira 

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I7(H iJfltjtial DP.. D5BQ0U, DS3600, DS75O0O. att. 

30003 Nat'Onul Lit«sar Dfila Booh.. 58.86 

1 1376 pB,»tiS.| LM, LF, ADC, DAC r Ltt StW*S 

90004 Natinrial Sat ies BO - Board Laval Camputar 1224 p*j6n I 14.96 

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1 *S? ' With Universal Plug a ni 

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1^3 irwh line tr-on« sdeptar to tratlery 

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AC 250 117W60HZ l2VACaL.UmA $3.=15 

AC 500 ri7Vji6QHz 12VAC SMrnA $JJ5 

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DV9200 117V.'60HJ 9VDC300mA E3 25 

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QBZ55 D-Subrrtln(Btur« Socket S3.50 

D20418-2 Screw Lock hfdwr. (2) DB25S/P 2,- , S.9^ 

D&51226 Cover for DB25P/S . Si, 75 

22/44S€ P.C. Edge (22/44 Pin I S2.95 

UG88/U BNCPIufl Sl.79 

UG89/U BMC Jack S379 

UG175/U UHF Adapter . . , . S -49 

SG239 UHFPaoef Recp Si Z9 

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PL259 UHF PJufl Sl.60 

LG260/U BNC P(u 8 4 Si, 79 

UG1094/U BNCBojkhe*d Recp - SI. 29 

TRS-80 
16K Conversion Kit 

Expand your 4K TRS-80 System Id 16K 
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1 





Micro Switch 69 Key Keyboard 

Uses AMI SW20350K Chip. Size. Ift-i'B'L x 5 1 /4 , 'uV k 1-^&"'H Metal 
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SVDC, 12VDCsnd24VDC 




SlO.Ofl Minimum Orde+ — U.S, Funds Only 
California Re &J dents Add 8% Salfls Tax 
Postage — Add 5% plus $1.50 Insurance 
Send S.A r S.E r tor Monihty Sale Firet! 



Spec Sheets — 25c 
Send 88-s Postage for your 
FREE 1 982 J AMECO CATALOG 
Prices Subject te Change 



-^ NEW 
CATALOG 




Mail Order Electronic;!; ■ Waridivide 



10 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



v* 38 



4/62 



1355 SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT. CA 94002 
PHONE ORDERS WELCOME — (4151 592-8Q97 



J.U t . l jJ K j M.^. B L. I MJ Ml Ujm Pl M 



FEATURESi VoHages.*; SVDC ■?£ SSamps, 12VDC ijf JJimipt, * 24VDC * 
Ajimps. P.i*d. Load: +SV cul *1%, 1 13 * 24V 0ul ±5% (20-100% 
lapdlj. OVtrtfOlt. 4: qrDS^cerr, ptOlKlipA, 11E QJ 230 VAC IflpJL Wt. 4 H)3- 
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'Total avaia^e output shall not exceed EiJD watla. 

General DflBcriptron: Ths ' Boschert ' PowBr Supply was originally 
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— MA fit OTHERS AVAtLABLE * WRITE FOR INFORMATION — 




JE600 

Hexadecimal 

Encoder Kit 

FULL B-BIT 
IATCHED OUTPUT 
19-KEV KEYSOARD 



Trie JES.UO. Encadgr Kevoa-aro Kit provide* Two sepurttt 

h l: x ;i ri t; - i rnai rli^itu iirdtlutiid from sequential key entries 
to at low direct progrjrnnir.g tor B bit microprocessor 
or B-bit m*mory clrcuitti. Trt<&e addltiortsl keys are pro- 
vided for user ops-ratio ni with One having a blltal?!^ 
ouiipjui avajtabln, Thv outrun art IfliehecS and monitored 
with 9 LED readouts. Also included ii ahoy entry ttrobe. 
Features; Full £-uit tetched oiitpui -for microprocessor 
use. Three user-dufirte keys with one b4lng bit-tapEe 
operation. Dabounca circuit pravtdad for all 19 fe?YS. 
fl LED readout* to verify etHfies. e*i¥ I n rerf a c i n q \^ith 
standard 16-pin LC connector. Only +5VDC required 
for operation Siza. 3>i"h M »»"W a 6^' r D 

JE 600/DTE^HK ^S^^S^ $99.95 



it-m.fxf\ \f± 19-Key HBKadec, Kayi&O'ir-j. d»t=Q Qr 

JEbOO Kit PCBoard tCmpnU. (no ta*e>. -*3y.y0 

K 19 1^-Kay Kejrboaro [Ktryboard aniyj .... Si 4,95 

DTE-HK (caw omy -3ift ,H Hx*^"WKa^"Dj $44.95_- 



See list of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1982 175 



m 



Why use their flexible discs: 

Athana. BASF, Control Data, Dysan, IBM, Maxell, Nashua, 
Scotch, Shugart, Syncom, 3M, Verbatim or Wabash 

when you could be using 




high quality error free discs? 



Product Description 

8" SSSD IBM Compatible (128 B/S r 26 Sectors) 

8" SSSD Shugart Compatible, 32 Hard Sector 

8" SSDD IBM Compatible (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 

8" DSDD Soft Sector (Unformatted) 

8" DSDD Soft Sector (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 

8" DSDD Soft Sector (1024 B/S, 8 Sectors) 

8" DSDD Burroughs Br80 Comp, 32 Hard Sector 

5%" SSSD Soft Sector (Unformatted) 

5W SSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 

5 1 /4" SSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5 1 /4" SSDD 16 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5W DSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 

5 1 /4" DSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

5W DSDD 16 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 

SSSD = Single Sided Singh Density: SSDD = Single Sided Double Density 
DSDD = Double Sided Double Density 

Memo rex Flexible Discs. ..The Ultimate in Memory Excellence 



Quality 

Memorex means quality products thai you can depend 
on Qua lily control at Memorex means a lading with I he 
besl materia Is avail able. Continual surveillance through- 
out ihe entice manufacturing process. The benefit of 
Memof ex's years ol experience in magnetic media pro- 
duction, resulting, for instance, in proprietary coating 
formulations. The most sophisticated testing proce- 
dures you'll find anywhere m the business. 

100 Percent Error Free 

Each and every Memorex Flexible Disc n certified to be 
1 00 percent error free. Each track of each flexible disc 
ts tested, indrvkjually. to Memore k"s stringent standards 
of excellence They test signal amplitude, resolution, 
fovrpass modulation, overwrite, missing pulse error 
and extra putse error They are torque-tested, and 
compehtiveiy tested on drives available from almost 
every major drive manufacturer in the industry includ- 
ing drives thai Memorex manufacturers. Rigid Quality 
audits are OuHt into every step of the manmanutactunng 
process and stringent testing result in a standard of 
excellence that assures you, our customer, of a quality 
product designed for increased data reliability and 
consistent top performance. 

Customer-Oriented Packaging 
Memorex'5 commitment to excellent does not slop 
with a quality product. They are proud of their flexible 
discs and they package them with pride. Both their 
packaging and Iheir labeling have been designed with 
your ease of identification and use in mind. The desk- 
top box containing ten discs is convenient for filing and 
storage, Both box labels and jacket labels provide full 
information on compatibility, density, sectoring, and 
record length. Envelopes with mull i language care and 
handling instruct ions and and color-coded removable 
labels are included. Awrite-proteci feature Is available 
to provide data security. 

Full One Year Warranty— You r Assurance of Quality 
Memo rex Flexible Discs will be replaced free ol charge 
by Memorex if they are found to be defective In materials 
or workmanship within one year ol the date of purchase. 
Other than replacement, Memorex will not be respon- 
sible for any damages or losses (including consequential 
damages! caused by the use ol Memorex Flexible 
Discs 



Quantity Discounts Available 
Memorex Flexible Discs are packed 10 discs to a 
canon and 10 cartons to a case. Please order only in 
increments of 100 units for quantity 100 pricing. We 
are also willing to accommodate your smaller orders. 
Quantities less than 100 units are available in incre- 
ments of 10 units at a 10% surcharge, Quantity 
discounts are also available Order 500 or more discs 
at the same time and deduct 1%; 1,000 or more saves 
you ?%; 2,000 or more saves you 3%; 5 f 0OG or more 
saves you 4%; 1 0.000 or more saves you 5%; 2 5 000 or 
more saves you €%: 50.000 or more saves you 7% and 
1 00,000 or more discs earns you an &% discount off our 
Super low quantity 100 price- Almost all Memorex 
Flexible Discs are immediately available from CE Our 
warehouse facilities are equipped to help us get you 
the quality product you need, when you need it. If you 
need further assistance to find the flexible disc that's 
right for you. call the Memorex compatibility hotline. 
Dial SOG-538-aoSQ and ask for the flexible disc hotline 
extension 0997 In California dial 800-672-352 5 ex- 
tension 0997. Outside the USA dial 406-987-0997 

Buy with Confidence 

To get the tastes! delivery tram CE of your Memorex Flexible 
Discs, send or phone your order cfeeclfy to our Computer 
Products Division Be sure i o calculate your price using rhe C E 
prices in this ad. Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax 
Wrirten purchase orders am Accepted Iforn approved govern- 
ment agencies and molt well rated firms at a 30% surcharge 
for net 30 billing,. All sates arc subject to avaiia nil iiy. acceptance 
and verification. All solos are final. Prices, terms and speci- 
fications are subject to change without notice. Out of stock 
items will be placed on bac Ik order automatically unless CE is 
instructed differently Minimum order $50.00. International 
orde rs are invited w 1 1 h a £20.00 surcho rge. t or speci a I h a nd I i n i;i 
in addition lo shipping charges. All shipments are F.O B Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. No GGD'tt plague NO ^certified and Foreign 
checks require hank clearance 

Mail ciders to Communications Electronics. Box 1002. 
Ann Arbor. Michigan 4EHQ& USA Add S3. 00 per case or 
partial-case of 100 8-lncti discs or S&.00 par case or partial 
case of 1 00 S % -inch m in<- disc« lor J P S . y round art ippj n g a n d 
handling! nine continent Hi US, A. It you have a MasterCard pr 
Visa card, you may call anytime and place a credit card order 
Order toll-free in ih« US Call anytime 800-521-4-114 II you 
It you are outside the US or m Michigan dial 313-99>4-4444 
Order your hjgt» quality, error tiee Memote* discs today 

Copyright ' 19&2 Communication* Electronics - 



Part# 

3062 
3015 
3090 
3102 
3115 
3104 
3092 
3401 
3481 
3483 
3485 



3493 
3495 



CE quant. 

100 price 
per disc ($) 

2.09 
2.09 
2.74 
3.14 
3.34 
3.34 
3.34 
1.94 
2.34 
2.34 
2.34 
3.09 
3.09 
3.09 



High Quality 
Error Free 



■ Mil 




Order Toll-I 

(800)521-4414 

In Michigan J3T3) 994^4444 




For Data Reliability — Memorex Flexible Discs 




tw 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 



^377 



Computer Products Division 

S54 PhoeniK 3 Bon 1 002 □ Ann Arbor. Michigan 48 1 06 U S A 
Call TOLL FREE (BOO) 521 4414 or outiida U.S.A. (313, 904 4444 



176 73 Magazine • April, 1982 



PROPAGATION 



J. H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr 
Whittng NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO 



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WESTERN UNITED STATES TO 




First letter = day waves Second - night waves 
A = Next higher frequency may also be useful 
B = Difficult circuit this period F = Fair G - Good 
P = Poor * = Chance of solar flares; ft - of aurora 



^^^™ 



DIRECTORY 



Phoenix AZ 



Somerset NJ 






The Southwell's i in w) j tnipnssive commurucu- New t^ncy^s anly factory- mil lit triified IGOM 
tiom comnanv Uhh^Jul: Kki^hkJ, 1mm, iiiid VAKSU distributor. [jirj3ji*iiiwiil*jTjr'rtFnfiw 
Yuesu, MFJ T BicW , .Vtmn. I-araen. Gushcraft, &n<\ uxxl s\veciak. Most nijijur brkiucl. in slwfc. 
Hy-Gain, BciiTicat, arid mure. Would like to Compkli mrvtce and f«t'illrif\, Bsdios 
sunv m.hj! Powrr Communications Corp.. 1640 UnUmilt^ 1T60 Easton Avoiuav P.O. Bon M~ r 
Wc&t'Camdhvk Hd-. ?bwmx AZ 850 15. Somrnrt NJ 08873: 46MS8S. 
241-Uatt. 



Philadelphia PA 
Camoen \J 



Culver C% CA 

jun\ Ekrtronki, 39 1 9 Srpuhcdi Blvd. , Cuhw Wa%^£uk^ & Coarisl Micnm -m*v Components 
rJnCA9Q2^ 1 3y^W03,Tr*dB46^I886S«i& Equi(M™nt. Lahotrnto^ Cr^t Tert In- 
Lhefjo. Call usKxi km quote. vtruments. Power Supplier, &u> . Sdl Ac Trade 

all popular makis— HP. CB, FXfl. ESI. Sonen- 

sen Si&HV, <tc. Lertrtmie fu^iardi Lab*, 1423 
Fcm Am, Camden NJ 06104, 541-1200. 






Fontana CA 

Complete lines ICOM, DKiTrrm, Ten-Tec, 
Vfir^ge. Ciihtc. I.unar 4 ivver 4000 electronic 
products for hobbyist. Irchnician. open- 
menter. Alsu CB ractki, laiulmnbile. F on tana 
Electronics. SS2h Sierra Ave., Fontana CA 
92335, S22-7710. 



San Diego CA 



Amsterdam NY 

UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kanwuntf, LCQAA, OnJm pluf pg otfaa 
Sun-%, Amateur Dealer for over 35 yearx, Adiron- 
dack Radifi SujipK'. Inc. , 185 \\\?*l Main Street. 
Amsterdam S\ I20lO y $42-8350. 






We buy and st?ll Surplus Army Na\y Eltsc- 

tronic* alsn Ternjiitnlcd Miiterial, What do you 

ujjtil to sell? Write I i ratalngue. Electronic- J, S3P n ^ 

knvTi, Inc., 440-71}! Avema-, PC B<jx 2048, San ' JJ ' «\Swm, DcnTrcm, Ajph N Nobol. MFJ, 



Syracuse- Rome- Utiea NY 

Kenwood. Vaseu, [CUM. Dralte, 



Dfego CA 021 12, 232-0370. 






San Jose CA 
SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 



Tempo, Astron, KLM, Hy Gain h Mosley, l^ar- 
*en, Cushcraftp Hastier, Mind Products. You 
WOCi'l It disappuifitvd wjih efpiipmenfiovicc. 
Hjtdio World, Oneida Counts Airpurl'Termi- 
n*I ftnMin& Oriskany NT 134^4, 33741203, 






Columbus OH 



Hamebrewen' lui\tm, tons of new and used 

Hanf Computer «ar and components. Serving 

Haras since 19^. We specialize in ICOM, The H&ot and be?* Hani Steer in the midV^t 

KLM. Mirw, Cornp*rwui. We ship worid^ (catunni: quality Kenwood products with 

wide. Tele-Com Elect ronicit, 15460 Union uoHdng displays We sell only the beaL 



A%enue. San J« CA 9S124, 377-4475. 



San Jose CA 

Bay area's newst Amateur Bacbu store. New Ac 
used Amateur Hadio tales & ten ice. We feature 
Kenwood, ICOM, Azden, Yaesu, Ten-Tec, 



Authorized Kenwood Service. L'nivenal 
Amateur Radio Inc., 12§0 Aida Dr., Rc^TwIcb- 
b«rf iC:(»litrnbu>! OH 



SaMllte T\ 



Bend OR 

Knoun brands 



t jill tudav for 



Santw & . ihaver Hadio. Inc., 137S mu « ^""ggffiSiJSS?^ *l™ ^ %££ r 

So. BascomAw., San h>»c CA ^125. 998-1 103, P«>tfr*ni- WESPtitCOM, P.O. Boi 722b, 
^ «.* yrm^.iHiiiji.Pc^^wiio,!!^^!!^ fcnd OR 1)7708. 35WW96. 






Smyrna GA Scranton PA 

For j-our Kenwood Yac*u r ICOM, DraJce and r C OM, bird, CushCrflft, Bwkmun. 



other amateur need*., come to see us. Brilf,* 
Two-Wav Radio, 250b N, Atlanta Rd., Smvrna 
CA300W, 432-MNHi 



Fluke, 

Artruli, 







Preston ID 

Ross WTJ7BYZ, has the Lar^st Stock of Ama- 
teur Cear in the Intrrmountain West and the 
Best Prices. Call me for all your ham needs. 
H«»v^ Di>trihutmc If Vi Mj!f-, PhAB! ll> 



Terre Haute IN 

Vour ham headquarteii located in the heart of 
the mi d w a it . Hoarier Electronics Inc., #9 
Meadows Center. P.O. Box 3300, Terre Haute 
l\47S0a3.23?M456, 



Lliim'il, Mustier, Ajnleimii Si^t'liilisK 
Avunii. Mden. W2AL 1 'W2VS. CDE, AEA, 
Vlbroi-ilra, Ham-Kev r CES. Ani|jh<.'»ol. Son v. 
ha ni mv Courier, B&W. Ameco, Shun.' ijiRue 
Electronics, I1L2 Craiuhiew Sl„ Scnuilun PA 
J§500, 343-2121. 



San Antonio TX 

Amateur, Commercial 2-iay. SeUircg Antenna 
' ists, A^'anti, Azden, Bird, H\ c^in, Stan- 
dard. Vihropkx. Vfidland. Henrx. CijihCralt 
DieJectnc. Hustkr, 1CONC Mr7, \ye, Sbure, 
Cubic, Tempo. Ten-Tec and irthm Appliance 
A: rxjuipment Co.. Inc. 2317 Vanw Jackson 
Road, San .Antonio TX 78213. 93S-3350. 



Littleton MA 



Vienna VA 

The Waslnneton metiopolitan nrva\ ttsdrag 
supplier of the latest in Amateur lladim and Test 
Ken- Etiuipment. On your iivxt trip to the Nation * 



Hi 



Tfie liain store of N.E, vou can ntlv on 

wood, ICOM, Wilson, V.if n. Dent ron, KLM Capital, *tu£ by and see^ : Elix-lmnic Eipjip- 

aiujw. liicW switches fie wutt meters. Whistler 

radiar detectors, Beuruut, Reujcncv 1 , antenna 1 ! hv 

Urbcn p Wilson, Hustler, CAM. TEL-COM 

Inc. Communications fit Electronics. 675 Great 

Hd., Ru 119. LitlleUin VIA Ul4b0, 4&6-3040. 



tl 12 13 14 15 

F/F F/F G/G G/G G/G 



Ann Arbor MI 

See us for products like Ten- Tec, R. L. Drake, 
Dentron and manv niorr. Open Monday 
thifmgh Saturday, 0630 to 1730 WBftVCR. 
WBSCXO, WTJfiOKV and WftRP behind thr 
counter. Purchase Radio Supplv, 327 E. Hoover 
Ave.. Ann Arhoi Ml 45104. t&M*696. 



18 19 20 21 22 

GAG G/G G/G F/F F/P 



25 26 27 

G/G F/F* F/F* 



Hudson NH 

Vrw EngUncft Distributor «nd AothcmzedSeT' 
>icr Ctnter for all Major Amateur Lines, Tufb J v ( 

^ d >M0^^!9S& 6J L " WeU "^ "^ ^ XH 03458. ATTS Sancy 

' * _L Ciampa. 



ol Kunk, Incl, 516 Mill St. N.E,, Vientia V'A 
22taU 03S-3350. 

DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
ran contain up to 25 words for as lit- 
tle as $150 yearly (prepaid) ^ or $15 
per month (prepaid quarterly )\ a\ 7 o 
mention of mail-order business or 
area code permitted. Directory text 
and payment must reach us 60 days 
in advance of ptihtication. For ex- 
ample, advertising for the June *S2 
issue must be in our hands by April 
Mail to 73 Magazhw. Peter- 



73 Magazine * April, 1982 177 









The FT-ONE is the culmination of an all-out design project by Yaesu's top 
engineering team. Working without the usual cost constraints, Yaesu's 
design group is proud to unveil the instrument they "always wanted to 
design/' a revolutionary blend of computer and RF technology. 



GENERAL COVERAGE, ALL SOLID STATE 

• * 

The FT-ONE is a full*coverage all-mode transceiver, equipped for 
reception on any frequency between 150 kHz and 29,99 MHz, with 
transmit coverage on all nine present and proposed amateur bands. In 
countries where permitted, the FT-ONE may be programmed to trans- 
mit throughout the 1.8-29.99 MHz range, 

KEYBOARD FREQUENCY ENTRY 

Fully digitally synthesized , the FT-ONE uses a front panel keyboard for 
initial frequency entry. Frequency change is then accomplished ma the 
main tuning dial or the pushbutton scanner, with tuning in either 10 Hz 
or 100 Hz steps possible. Truly the contester s dream, the FT-ONE 
permits extremely fine tuning and instantaneous band change with 
equal facility 

DUAL VFO SYSTEM 

Ten digital VFO's with memory are provided, in conjunction with an 
A-B selection scheme that allows instant recall of any transmit, 
receive, or transceive frequency desired, For split-frequency 
operation, such as on 7 MHz SSB, the operator may select TX on 
VFO-A and RX on VFO-B, automatically storing the calling and 
listening frequencies for each pile-up. For net operations, a non- 
volatile memory board is available as an option, to eliminate the 
possibility of dumping memory. 

FULL CW BREAK-IN 

Recent advances in solid-state technology have finally made full CW 
break-in reliable enough to be incorporated into a Yaesu product. Now 
you can select traditional semi-break-in (for use with amplifiers not 
equipped for full break-in) or full high-speed break-in. When using 
amplifiers so equipped, the keyer output lead may be interrupted via a 
rear panel jack and routed to the break-in sequencing input on your 
amplifier, 

SWITCHING REGULATOR POWER SUPPLY 

Extremely compact and light in weight, the switching regulator power 
supply reduces substantially the space required to produce the 
operating voltages used in the FT-ONE. Highly efficient and uniquely 
stable, the switching regulator supply provides superb reliability in a 
field of design long neglected by amateur manufacturers, 

ELITE CLASS PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

In addition to the full break-in and superb receiver filters. Yaesu s 
design team packed the FT-ONE with subtle virtues that others might 
have overlooked, Rear panel jacks allow the use of both an external 
receiver and an independent receive antenna, such as a 160 meter 
Beverage. While scanning, automatic halting on a received signal may 
be programmed. . , perfect for watching a band for openings. If you re 
a DX-pedJtJoner an optional Curtis 8044 keyer board is available, so 
you won't need an external keyer that only wastes suitcase space. And 
it your amplifier fan i$ louder than it should be, there's even a micro- 
phone squelch (AMGC) to reduce background noise pickup between 
words and sentences! 



ONE YEAR FACTORY WARRANTY 

Because of the level of attention to design detail, parts selection, and 
factory quality control, your FT-QNE is backed by a one-year factory 
warranty tor the original purchaser at retail Prompt and meticulous 
attention to your warranty needs will be provided by our Ohio And 
California Service Centers. In addition, all units sold in the United 
States will be inspected and tested after clearing Customs, and wilt 
include a Service Manual in the puchase price. 

GAIN/INTERCEPT OPTIMIZED RECEIVER 
FRONT END 

Utilizing up-conversion with a first IF of 73 MHz, the FT-ONE RF 
amplifier stage uses push-pull power transistors configured to pro- 
duce a typical output intercept of +40 dBm, The first mixer utilizes a 
diode ring module followed by a low noise post amp, for optimum 
noise figure consistent with modem day intercept requirements The 
result is a receiver with a typical two-tone dynamic range well in 
excess of 95 dB {14 MHz, CW bandwidth). Additional gain tailoring is 
provided via a PIN diode attenuator controlled from the front panel. 

FILTERS READY FOR COMPETITION 

Three filter bandwidths are available for CW operation (two for FSKI), 
using optional 600 Hz or 300 Hz crystal filters. Filter insertion losses 
are equalized for constant IF gain. Both IF Shift and Variable Band- 
width are provided, and two CW filters may be cascaded- for 
competition-grade selectivity. For SSB work, the Variable Bandwidth 
feature eliminates the need for costly 1 .5 kHz or 1 .8 kHz filters, as any 
intermediate bandwidth may easily be programmed using the 
standard, cascaded SSB filters. To top it alt off, a high-performance 
audio peak and notch filter is standard equipment. 

EXPANDED OPERATING DISPLAYS 

Digital displays for the VFO Frequency, memory channel, and RtT 
offset are provided for quick frequency identification. The large front 
panel meter provides easy viewing of transceiver operating para- 
meters, including final tfansistor collector current input DC voltage. 
FM discriminator center tuning, speech processor compression level, 
and forward/reflected relative power, 



NOT AVAILABLE AS OPTIONS 

It's hard to believe that other manufacturers still insist on making such 
essential items as a noise blanker or speech processor extra-cost 
options. We find that these are less expensive to incorporate and more 
reliable in operation when installed on our assembly line. No AC power 
supply is available as an option for the FT-ONE, either, tfs equipped 
tor operation from 100/1 10/1 1 7/200/220/234 vote AC.or 13.5 volts 
DC. And it goes without saying that there will not be an external VFO 
offered for the FT-ONE — we 1 re confident that ten VFO's are quite 
enough ! 



Experience the FT-ONE in your Authorized Yaesu Dealer's showroom today. 
This may be the last Amateur transceiver you will ever own. ^ 



Warranty policy available upon request. SASE, please. 



Specifications subject to change without notice or obligation 



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Processor, IF shift, N/W switch, affordable 




An incredibly compact, full -featured, 
reasonably priced, ail solid-state HF 
SSB/CW transceiver for both mobile and 
fixed operation. It covers 3.5 to 29.7 MHz 
(including the three new Amateur bands) 
and features digital display, IF shift, 
speech processor, and narrow/ wide Miter 
selection on both SSB and CW, 

TS 130SB FEATURES: 

80*10 meters, including three new bands 

Covers all Amateur bands from 3*5 to 29.7 
MHz. including the new 10, 18, and 24-MHz 
bands Receives WWV on 10 MHz. VFO 
covers more than 50 kHz above and below 
each 500 -kHz band. 
Two power versions,., easy operation 
TS-130SE runs 200 W PEP/160 W DC on 
80-15 meters, and 160 W PEP" 140 W DC on 
12 and 10 meters. TS-130V runs 25 W 
PEP/20 W DC input on all bands. Solid- 
state, wideband final amplifier eliminates 
transmitter tuning; receiver wideband RF 
amplifiers eliminate preselector peaking. 

* Digital display built-in 

Six-digit green fluorescent tube display 
indicates operating frequency to 100 Hz. 
external VFO or fixed-channel frequency, 
R1T shift* and CW transm it-receive shifts. 
Analog subdial back-up. 

• Built-in Speech Processor 
Increases audio punch and average SSB 
output power. 



■ IF shift circuit 
Very effective in eliminating interfering 
signals, by placing them outside the IF 

passband. 

CW narrow/wide selection 

*N-W* switch allows selection of wide 
or narrow bandwidths. Wide CW and SSB 
. bandwidths are the same. Optional YK-88C 
(500 Hz) or YK-88CN (270 Hz) Biter may be 
Installed for narrow CW. 

SSB narrow selection 
"N-W switch allows selection of narrow 
SSB bandwidth to eliminate QRM. when 
optional YK-88SN (1.8 kHz) filter Is installed. 
(CW filter may still be selected in CW mode.) 

* Sideband mode selected automatically 

LSB on 40 meters and below; USB on 30 
meters and above, SSB REVERSE position 
on MODE switch. 

RF Attenuator, built-in 

Allows optimum rejection of IM distortion. 

Single conversion PLL system 

Provides improved stability and spurious 
characte rtsties * 

Protection circuit for final amplifier, 

For maximum reliability, the final amplifier 
Is protected bv circuitry that monitors 
VSWR and temperature, JTS-130V, VSWR 
only.) Output power is reduced when 
abnormal operating conditions occur. If 
especially severe operation is anticipated, 
optional cooling fan, model FA-4, may be 
added. Model TS-130S, with FA^l 
installed, is also available. 



* Effective noise 

Eliminates pulse-type noise. 

Compact and lightweight 

Only 3-3 4 H x 912 W x 11-9/16 D (Inches!; 

weight 12.3 lbs. 

Other important features Include: 

VOX for SSB. CW semi break-In with 

sidetone. one fixed channel, and 25 kHz 

marker* 




Optional DFC-230 Digital Frequency 
Controller 

Allows frequency control in 20-Hz steps 
with UP/DOWN microphone (supplied 
with DFC-230). Includes four memories 
(handy for split-frequency operation) 
and digital display. Covers 100 kHz 
above and below'each 5004tHz band. 
Very compact, 



More information on the TS-130 Series is 
available from all authorized dealers of 

Trio-Kenwood Communications 
11U West Walnut Street 
Compton, California 90220. 



KENWOOD 



Matching accessories for 
PS- 30 base station power * 

supply iremotelv swttchablc ' 

ON or OFF wUhTS-130SE « 

power switch]. 

Other accessaries 
FA-4 fan unit forTS-130SE 
YK-88C (500 Hal and 
YK-88CN (270 HzJ CW filters * 

YK-83SN (1.8 kHzl narrow SSB filter * 
AT-130 compact antenna tuner {60-10 * 
meters, including 3 new bands) 
MBiOO mobile mounting brackets * 
KPS-21 base station power supply * 
(also for TS-130SEI t 

TL-922A linear amplifier 



station operation: 
SP-120 external speaker 
VFO-120 remote VFO 
MC-50 50kG/500Q desk 
microphone 

not shown: 

PS-20 base-station power 
supply for TS-130V 
PC-1 phone patch 
HC-10 world digital clock 
MC-305 and MC-35S noise 
cancelling hand microphones 
MC-60 deluxe desk microphone 
SP-40 compact mobile speaker 
HS-4. HS 5, and HS-6 
headphones 



in amateur radio 




Specifications and prices are stibtect to change without notice or obligation